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He is the man behind Gray Matter Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark McFarlane: My name is Mark McFarlane, and I am a filmmaker, designer and artist based in Ayrshire, Scotland.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Mark McFarlane: I always loved films growing up, and I have an especially vivid memory of watching ‘The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly‘ with my grandfather. Bizarrely, considering the types of films I love and make now, I was a very timid child and couldn’t watch horror films! Later, I worked in a variety of jobs, from security guard right up to being a graphic designer for a major UK retailer, but I was never satisfied with any of them. So at a crucial point I decided to pursue my long-standing dream of making films, and from the very first moment of sitting down for a production meeting I knew that making films was what I needed to do.

SKSM: Why Gray Matter was cancelled? Is it possible for Stephen King fans to see it in a future?

Mark McFarlane: Gray Matter was cancelled for a variety of reasons, cast and crew availability, location and equipment issues, but I think the main reason is the same for aspiring filmmakers everywhere – a lack of money! At that time crowdfunding platforms were still quite a new thing, so I although sites such as Kickstarter could have been a fantastic source of production budget for us, our relative inexperience with that type of funding led to us halting production. Fortunately we were able to move on with other projects such as my short film ‘Mara‘, which was created for the BBC3 series ‘The Fear‘ here in the UK, and also performed well at Dragon Con in Atlanta.

However, I am still passionate about telling the story of ‘Gray Matter‘, and  I’m happy to announce that we are once again moving forward with the project. We are working on some exciting things right now, and we hope to make a bigger announcement in the very near future.

SKSM: Who would be involved into this project?

Mark McFarlane: As well as myself, my long-term writing collaborator and editor Jimmi Johnson, who edited the ‘Cabal Cut’ of ‘Clive Barker’s Night Breed‘, will be editing the film. It is being produced by two incredibly talented and enthusiastic people – Holly Madew and Danny Sullivan. Thay have been instrumental in resurrecting the project and ushering it to the stage we re currently at. We are currently looking at casting and filling other key roles, but we are firmly at the discussion stage regarding those.

SKSM: How come you picked Gray Matter to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mark McFarlane: I picked ‘Gray Matter‘ because I find the characters so compelling, which I think is a universal trait amongst all of King’s stories. When I first read it, everyone was so vivid and clear in my mind. The best thing for me (and my adaptation) was that although the story is set in Maine, I could easily relate the charcters to people I knew growing up in my small hometown in Scotland. I loved the story, but I also fell in love with the idea of setting the story in Scotland yet changing almost nothing about the core story and characters, almost to prove that these characters are so wonderful an real that they work literaly anywhere in the world.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Mark McFarlane: I did know that it had already been filmed. Unfortunately I’ve only been able to see the trailers for these adaptations. I’m a big fan of the Dollar Baby program and love that all these other filmmakers have been able to give their own unique take on such wonderful source material.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Mark McFarlane: I am a massive Stephen King fan! I love the ‘Dark Tower‘ series and was obsessed with it for years, but my all-time favourite story of his is ‘The Mist‘, and I absolutely adore Frank Darabont’s adaptation. I think it’s about as perfect an adaptation of a story as you can get. I also love the book ‘From A Buick 8‘, which I know is a bit of a divisive one, but I’d love to take a crack at adapting it for film one day!

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Mark McFarlane: I became aware of the Dollar Baby scheme after watching a documentary about Frank Darabont which briefly mentioned it. I did some research and once I found out how to go about it, I made it my goal to adapt a Stephen King story. It’s taken a lot longer than I’d hoped!

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Mark McFarlane: I’ve been suffering some long term health issues which have forced me to ease my workload with regards to filmmaking, which has allowed me to re-embrace my art and design skills. I’ve recently completed several paintings, including one for ‘The Walking Dead UK‘ and a large piece featuring some charactrs from ‘Twin Peaks‘. I also created a map of Mid-World from the ‘Dark Tower‘ series which has been well received on my RedBubble store. I like to stay creative whenever I can, and my partners and I still have a variety of film scripts ready for future development.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Mark McFarlane: I don’t know! I think maybe people will be surprised that I’m still around, still trying to make ‘Gray Matter‘, and haven’t given up after all these years!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Mark McFarlane: I’d like to thank your readers for their continued interest and support of all us Dollar Baby filmmmakers. It’s your passion for these stories that makes us want to make the very best adaptations we possibly can.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else to this interview?

Mark McFarlane: I’d like to personally thank you Óscar, for the work you do keeping everyone informed about Dollar Babies, and your kind, gracious attitude towards us. It’s been a pleasure talking to you!

 

He is the Producer in Walter Perez‘s Into The Night Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers?

Marc Mora: Hello, I am Marc Mora and I once gave Freddy Kruger a nightmare.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a producer?

Marc Mora: The movie industry has always been the candle to my moth. Every aspect of it. Writing, directing, acting, producing, etc. I love helping tell visual stories.

SKSM: How did you become involved in ‘Into the Night‘ Dollar Baby film?

Marc Mora: I have worked with Walter in the past and when he told me he was working on a King project I had to get involved. King is one of my favorite authors.

SKSM: Can you tell us about your work in the film?

Marc Mora: I did a little of everything. I helped with lighting, assisted the set designers, procured equipment, and at one point was even the night. (Human tripod a black sheet). I just floated amongst everything and tried to help whenever i could.

SKSM: What was it like to work with Walter Perez on this film?

Marc Mora: It was a great experience. I can honestly say I picked up some tricks of the trade.

SKSM: Was there any funny things that happened while filming (Bloopers, etc)?

Marc Mora: Let’s see… honestly, I cannot think of a thing. I am sure we had some laughs but nothing stands out.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Marc Mora: Jumped the gun on this earlier. Yeah, a huge fan. I’m a horror savant.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Something you’d like to tell our readers?

Marc Mora: Watch this film when we release it. Or else… well you never know what might be waiting for you in the night.

 

She worked in Production Coordinator and Wardrobe in Walter Perez‘s Into The Night Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers?

Christijana Mora: Hi! My name is Christijana Mora, I led the Wardrobe dept, Snow, and am one of the Production Coordinators on the film ‘Into The Night’.

SKSM: How did you become involved in ‘Into the Night‘ Dollar Baby film?

Christijana Mora: I became involved in ‘Into The Night’ when I met Walter through my husband, Marc Mora (one of the producers). Learning that they needed help on the film and seeing this as an exciting experience, I couldn’t say no!

SKSM: In this production, you worked as a Production Coordinator and Wardrobe – What was that like? Is this something you want to venture further into the industry?

Christijana Mora: Working with multiple Production Coordinators was a relief in this film. As a coordinator, your skills for multi-tasking are always challenged. But with help, the load of the work was made more fun than stressful.

Now on wardrobe, we had to come up with some creative ways to tell the genre without losing the essence of the horror and I think we were able to grasp that.

Since working on this film, it definitely has me wanting to venture even more into period pieces and to fine tune my creative eye for more ideas on set design and wardrobe in the future.

SKSM: Can you tell us more about your work in the film?

Christijana Mora: I also took on the role as “Snowmaster” during the filming of ‘Into the Night’.  With my experience with fake and the real thing, I was able to recreate the look and effects of this harsh element. Working with hot and cold temperatures is always a risk, but our cast and crew were troopers and pulled through.

A big thanks to SNOW BUSINESS HOLLYWOOD for all their help.

SKSM: What was it like to work with Walter Perez on this film?

Christijana Mora: Working with Walt was really easy.

In easy, I mean lots and lots of meetings, driving to loads of locations, and late hours with a splash of Starbucks coffee. Haha

But it was all worth it, he really pulled through to making this script become the real deal. Walter was always there, whenever I needed a second opinion and great for the catch up talks. I think we all walked away with something learned. Also, I couldn’t thank him enough for giving me the opportunity, so I’ll be always grateful for that. 🙂 Looking forward to the next one Walt!

SKSM: Was there any funny things that happened while filming (Bloopers, etc)?

Christijana Mora: For funny things while shooting? Well, there’s always the occasional background sounds we pick up, when we were on locations that were out of our control.

But I think the funniest was the one day when the whole cast and crew all went to Big Bear for final shots, everyone hauled into carpools. After the 2 ½ hr drive, we arrive to find there was not enough snow to work with. Our jaws dropped,we couldn’t believe how much had melted away, it was reported to snow heavily the days before. So we drove back to L.A and that was the end of the day. Hahaha #LA sun is Fierce

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Christijana Mora: So I actually missed out on reading his books when I was little, the Goosebumps books from R.L. Stine were more my level of spooky back then.

More or less Stephen King was something that I realized I watched on tv and didn’t know it was until later. He definitely has that real Adult scare factor down. My husbands more of a super fan, so I’ve actually gotten to grow more into King’s art lately (and loving it!).

It would be pretty cool to see a mashup of Stine and King… that would be super freaky fun!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there something you’d like to tell our readers?

Christijana Mora: Of course, it was my pleasure. Thanks for the interview! 🙂

I’ll leave off with, for all those in film, who love film for the sake of film and if your a fan of King; you’re willing to see everything. Even with this being a short, give into your S.K. fandom and watch this. It’s a really good piece that continues from a classic tale we all know from Stephen King stories.

 

 

He played in Stephen Baxter‘s Dollar Baby Rest Stop as Boris.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Christopher B. MacCabe: I am a Canadian Actor of Irish and Scottish descent. I started off as a Sailor working on cargo ships when I was 18 years old, which I still periodically do to this day, I am at sea at the moment.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Christopher B. MacCabe: I was 20 years old, an introvert and I went to see a play, Nothing To Lose, by Canadian playwright, David Fennario. I was hooked. I harnessed my will and dove right in and joined a theatre company at 21 years old and my first role was a Sailor in the shipwreck scene of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night and also as Second Officer. I spent seven years doing amateur theatre and then went on to study at the prestigious Banff Centre, School of Fine Arts for three years. Later I was honoured to join the World Renowned Warren Robertson Atelier in Montreal for several years.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Rest Stop Dollar Baby film?

Christopher B. MacCabe: I saw a casting post for Rest Stop on Facebook and seeing it was based on a Stephen King story immediately sparked my interest. When I read the character breakdowns, I submitted myself for the auditions.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Christopher B. MacCabe: I think many people dream of living another life, living in someone else’s shoes; creating change in our world to better it; making a difference. The path of a hero can fulfill that dream. Storytellers, I believe are the guiding lights for humanity. Amy Halloran’s clever adaptation along with Stephen Baxter’’s gifted direction, Wyler Diome-Montour’s captivating cinematography and Eric Davis‘s outstanding performance elevates the audience’s experience.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Christopher B. MacCabe: Stephen Baxter, the director contacted me by phone, after I sent him my resume and reel. I informed him I was very interested in the project. Being a dialect coach as well, I mentioned that I could do several accents. He asked to hear my Russian accent. I did several  versions from authentic to stereotypical. He later contacted me and offered me the Role of Boris. I quess I auditioned by phone. I was very happy.

SKSM: You worked with Stephen Baxter on this film, how was that?

Christopher B. MacCabe: Stephen Baxter is an actors’ director. He has worn both hats. He understands actors and has a way that makes you relax and create and trust. He was well prepared and organized. I wouldn’t hestitate to work with him again.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Christopher B. MacCabe: The (awesome) Blood Brothers who did special effects when I got shot and my mouth was full of fake blood, I was always fighting not to swallow it because it tasted so good and it always made me want to smile, like you do with ice cream.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Christopher B. MacCabe: I still stay in contact with Stephen Baxter and longtime colleague, Andrew Campbell from Cold Blue Rentals Regd, one of our country’s best Weapons Masters and Armourers. Having worked with him in the past on huge to small projects, hearing he was onboard was a delight, a safe professional, a must with shootouts and I got to act with him as well! I also keep in touch with the Multi-talented Ashleigh Faith Williams, it was her first film role and definitely an Actress to keep your eye on!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Christopher B. MacCabe: I am working on a web-series about a handler of undercover agents and a Shakespeare podcast of his famous scenes and monologues.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Christopher B. MacCabe: Yes, definitely, The Shawshank Redemption and Dolores Claiborne are two of my favourite films and books. Countless other films and series.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Christopher B. MacCabe: Well, that I steer large ships.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Christopher B. MacCabe: I want to thank them for enjoying and supporting Stephen Baxter the Director and Amy Halloran’s adaptation of Stephen King’s Rest Stop. A lot of hard work and love was put into this project and the fans support makes it all worthwhile! There are storytellers in all of us!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Christopher B. MacCabe: I hope I am privileged to work with Stephen Baxter and his team again. Shout out to the whole crew and cast that brought this project to fruition! Claudie-Ann Landrie our stylist and Liliana Saavedra; thumbs up!

 

She played in Joana Lima Martin‘s Dollar Baby Ayana as Charlotte.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Sheila Collins: With pleasure. I am currently working solely as an actor, but I have previously done mental health counseling in a community health center. Prior to that, I worked in the Standards & Practices división of several televisión stations, mostly on game shows (to ensure fairness) and also on a couple of daytime talk shows.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Sheila Collins: I’d been interested in acting since early adulthood. But life intervened and I didn’t pursue acting until I entered middle age. During my first acting experience, I knew it was what I wanted to devote my life to.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Ayana Dollar Baby film?

Sheila Collins: While living in San Francisco, where I had finally decided to pursue acting as a profession, I auditioned for the film maker, who herself was pursuing a degree in film making at San Francisco State University. The role was for the mother of the main carácter, “Ayana.”

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Sheila Collins: Well, it has a number of compelling themes. It’s a story about overcoming adversity, it’s a love story, and it’s a story about family. Ayana is a young woman who is blind and wants to have an operation that will restore her sight. She’s a college student and listens to some of her required Reading on audiotape. Then one day she accidently meets the Young man whose voice she’s been listening to. They develop a friendship and blossoms into a romantic relationship.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Sheila Collins: Yes, I auditioned.

SKSM: You worked with Joana Lima Martins on this film, how was that?

Sheila Collins: Joana was very professional, encouraging and supportive of her cast and crew, and had a clear visión for how this story should unfold. She was a pleasure to work with.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Sheila Collins: I had a very emotional scene to do that required me to break down crying. I have always been able to cry on cue, shed real tears, get the red, runny nose, everything! Joana made sure this scene would be shot on a closed set, so as to respect the demands on my process. The scene had to be shot six times in all for one reason or another. Each time, tears freely fell down my face. Each time, that is, until the 6th time when my tears had completely dried up! It was so weird. We had to take a break to allow me time to recover and be able to produce more tears. We finally wrapped the scene, tears and all, on the 7th try!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Sheila Collins: Oddly enough, I have only maintained a friendship with the one cast member that I never had a scene with. Joana returned to be native Portugal after graduating, and my communications with the other actors diminished over time. I remain friends only with Arye Bender, the actor who played the father of the Young man in Ayana’s life.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Sheila Collins: I still audition for TV and film, and during 2018 I shot  an episode of S.W.A.T., a TV show that is now in its second season. I also appeared in fan film of the Deadpool charácter. It’s called “Deadpool the Musical 2.” In 2017, I appeared in an episode of Grey’s Anatomy, a show that is seen all over the world, apparently.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Sheila Collins: Yes, I am a long-time Stephen King fan. I’ve read several of his horror novels and really enjoyed his novel, Joyland, that latest one I’ve read.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Sheila Collins: That I whistle really well!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Sheila Collins: Just that if you’re Reading this interview, you are probably a writer, an actor, a film maker or all three. Keep pursuing your dreams.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Sheila Collins: Thank you, Óscar, for including me in your interview series.

 

She played in Stephen Baxter‘s Dollar Baby Rest Stop as Ellen.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Lorraine Pellicone: I live in Montreal, Canada and have been acting for a few years now. I am the youngest child in my family (I have two older sisters) and my cultural background is Italian. On my spare time, I love exercising, discovering new recipes, and meditating. I am also a classically-trained ballerina.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Lorraine Pellicone: The earliest memory I have of this is being about 7 years old and telling my parents very dramatically (with the back of my hand over my forehead, very old Hollywood-style) that I was going to be an actress! Then I dropped out of it for quite a while until I rediscovered it 5 years ago.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Rest Stop Dollar Baby film?

Lorraine Pellicone: I saw the casting call on Facebook in a Montreal casting group. There was a local film festival running at the time, so we had to submit self-taped auditions online. I filmed the audition after an acting class and Stephen and Amy offered me the role a few days later.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Lorraine Pellicone: This story focuses a lot on image; how a person sees themselves vs how they want other people to see them. This sort of image management is a universal struggle and I think the viewers can relate to Dykstra’s confusion between what he thinks is his “real” self (the timid college professor) and what he thinks is a made-up character to sell product (Hardin). Both personalities are a part of Dykstra though and I think watching him discover this is very interesting.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Lorraine Pellicone: I auditioned for the role.

SKSM: You worked with Stephen Baxter on this film, how was that?

Lorraine Pellicone: Brilliant. This was one of the most organized and talented crews I’ve worked with. Stephen was considerate and patient, and a great leader. The cast and crew all worked so well together and part of that can definitely be attributed to Stephen’s steady directing. I loved the finished product. Stephen has great vision.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Lorraine Pellicone: It was actually my birthday the day we filmed Ellen’s scenes. During the lunch break, in-between takes of Adam and I fighting in the bathroom, the cast and crew sang me happy birthday! It was a pleasant break from the very bleak scenes we were shooting.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Lorraine Pellicone: Yes I do. The Montreal acting scene is close-knit, so I see many of the cast and crew at local events. I see Adam most often as we have many mutual friends and have known each other since high school.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Lorraine Pellicone: I will be working on some other local short films. Looking forward to what 2019 will bring!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Lorraine Pellicone: I’ve seen several Stephen King films throughout the years (Carrie, Pet Sematary, The Shining, and Dolores Claiborne). Truthfully, I’m too afraid of horror films to watch them very often. I’m still afraid of scenes from Carrie and Pet Sematary and it’s been probably 15 years since I’ve watched the movies!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Lorraine Pellicone: I have many interests and skills outside of acting. I have a Bachelor of Arts degree from McGill University in Montreal in History, with a double-minor in Political Science and Religious Studies. At one point, I had strongly considered going into International Law.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Lorraine Pellicone: Thank you so much for your interest in the film! It was a great experience and I’m so happy to share this work with everyone.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Lorraine Pellicone: A shout out to my friends and family for supporting me throughout this fun, busy journey!

 

He played in J.P. Scott‘s Dollar Baby Everything’s Eventual as Skipper.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Shane Dean: Hello! This is Shane Dean aka Shark. Actor, director, singer, songwriter, producer and fighter.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Shane Dean: I am more than just an actor. I have a very broad spectrum of of talents that I began utilizing during my child hood and have been working my career as an entertainment business man since child hood. Feel free to see my website shanedeanakashark.com

SKSM: How did you become involved in Everything’s Eventual Dollar Baby film?

Shane Dean: I became involved with the Everything’s Eventual project after having a successful series of auditions with Director JP Scott and an excellent chemistry with Lead Actor Michael Flores.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Shane Dean: I think people are attracted to the story because everything that Mr. King writes is golden and always creates wonderful, thought provoking, and interesting tales.

SKSM: You worked with J.P. Scott on this film, how was that?

Shane Dean: Working with JP was an excellent experience. He is indeed an actor’s director. A real pro and a pleasure to work with.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Shane Dean: Probably my most fun or interesting moment in the film was when I had the opportunity to beat up Dinky Earshaw (Lead actor Flores) on camera as I choreographed the fight with Michael upon our meeting during the audition process … Which ultimately helped us land our roles and develop the chemistry we had during filming.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Shane Dean: I haven’t really had much contact with the cast and crew lately.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Shane Dean: I am currently in the marketing phase of my latest feature films DUSTWUN and Coyotaje. One of wich is already sold to a major distributor and the other is in the Berlin Film Festival. I am also currently in pre production for several projects with UNIVERSAL and a few other choice projects.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Shane Dean: Of course I am a fan of Mr. King! I have read several of his works and seen most if not all his films.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Shane Dean: I think people would be very surprised to know that. Despite often playing the very aggressive character in cinema I am a very compassionate, sensitive, and gentle person. Unless there is a need to defend others especially women and children who have been abused. As you can see in this award winning project SlaveS which you can view on my website as listed above in the FRONT PAGE section of the site. And to learn more of our campaign go to slavesmovie.com

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Shane Dean: Lastly I want to thank Oscar for this interview opportunity. And a HUGE thanks for fans out there who appreciate my work. I am continuously  humbled by my blessings at times as I work feverishly hard at all that I do. And in conclusion please keep your eyes open for what may be the most important project in my life as I have invested my entire heart and soul into the project DUSTWUN. So please see our imdb page at DUSTWUN

As well as our DUSTWUN fan page on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/dustwunmovie/

I thank you and love you all. Happy Holidays around the world!

 

 

He played in Stephen Baxter‘s Dollar Baby Rest Stop as John Dykstra/Rick Hardin

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Eric Davis: I’m an actor based in Montreal. I’ve been working in the business for 20 odd years or so. I started out in theatre and eventually moved on to voice over, TV and film. These days I also do a lot of video game motion capture and voice.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Eric Davis: I had a chance to audition for the National Theatre School after high school. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to pursue my visual art background or jump off the deep end and try acting. I’d done one high school play and that’s it. I wasn’t even in drama. The auditions were being held in a rehearsal hall at the National Arts Center in Ottawa where they had a production of Phantom of the Opera playing on the main stage. I was so nervous I had to take a walk to try and get rid of my jitters. I stumbled upon the stage door and beyond, the main stage, filled with the set an props from Phantom. I spent the next half hour in awe, exploring that stage and the set pieces. I completely missed my audition but standing on that grand stage and looking out at the empty seats reaffirmed my desire to give the acting thing a real concerted effort. Thankfully, I didn’t miss my next audition.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Rest Stop Dollar Baby film?

Eric Davis: Stephen Baxter and I had worked together previously on a couple of projects and we got on very well. He contacted me directly about being involved in Rest Stop and I couldn’t say no. Both the chance to work with him again and be involved in bringing a Stephen King short to the screen was ample enticement!

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Eric Davis: I think it’s a pretty universal human dilemma to ponder our own duality – the pull of light and dark, right and wrong, good and evil, within us. What’s so great about Mr. King’s short story is how efficiently it presents that question. “What would you do in this situation?” It’s simple but profound and, I believe,  instantly relatable.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Eric Davis: I didn’t audition. Stephen Baxter contacted me directly and asked if I’d like to take on the role. It wasn’t written for me. Obviously we have Mr. King to thank for the character and story.

SKSM: You worked with Stephen Baxter on this film, how was that?

Eric Davis: It was fantastic! Working with Stephen is a joy and there’s an ease to the language of director/actor there that is special. I’d work with him again in a  heartbeat. We were also blessed with a great cast and crew which can make or break a production.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Eric Davis: There is a moment in the film when my character, John Dykstra, flees the titular rest stop in his car. It was 4 something in the AM and the light of dawn was imminent so we were scrambling to get our last shots done. With Wyler Diome-Montour, our cinematographer, wedged in the passenger seat with the camera, I peeled out of the parking lot. In a way, even though it’s only a couple of seconds in the final film, it was a cathartic moment for me both as an actor and as the character, running away, pedal to the metal, not just from the rest stop and what transpires there but from himself.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Eric Davis: I’m still in contact with Stephen Baxter and Amy Halloran fairly regularly as well as a few of the other actors. Montreal has a fairly small film community so it’s not uncommon to run into each other at auditions or on different projects.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Eric Davis: I just finished working on a big World War II movie directed by Roland Emmerich called Midway, due in November 2019. I’m also currently doing performance capture for a video game franchise that I’m not allowed to mention due to non disclosure agreements! I’m excited about it though. There are some fantastic and talented people involved.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Eric Davis: Absolutely. I grew up reading Stephen King as a teenager and while I don’t read him as much these days his works are intrinsically linked to some hugely formative moments in my life. My favourite would have to be his Dark Tower series  but I also love a lot of his short stories. It’s great that his stuff is being adapted so much these days. It speaks to how popular and prolific he is.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Eric Davis: I think it would probably be how much of an introvert I am personally. There’s a stigma to being an actor that people tend to assume that that person is gregarious and outgoing. That’s part of the fun, though, of inhabiting a character different from myself and living in a different skin, so to speak.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Eric Davis: I hope people enjoy the film, of course, but I also hope it inspires thoughts and discussions on the nature of being human – that duality we are confronted with daily. And how a split second choice can determine whether we rise to do good or fall to evil.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Eric Davis: That’s all! Thanks.

 

She played in Vanessa Ionta Wright‘s Dollar Baby Rainy Season as Laura Stanton.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jan Nelson: I’m a former college theatre professor and free-lance actress.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Jan Nelson: I used to sit and watch the Ted Mack Ameteur Hour when I was probably around 6 or 7 years old and dreamt of performing one day.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Rainy Season Dollar Baby film?

Jan Nelson: I saw an open audition notice and sent my headshot and reel to Vanessa. I then got asked to come and audition live.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Jan Nelson: I think Vanessa did a great job of creating suspense rather than gore. So many films today go for the sensationalism rather than building the story. Rainy Season is similar to a story by Shirley Jackson, called The Lottery, which I used to teach to high school students.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Jan Nelson: I auditioned.

SKSM: You worked with Vanessa Ionta Wright on this film, how was that?

Jan Nelson: Vanessa was very organized and used everyone’s time well.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jan Nelson: Sorry, I can’t really think of anything. I was only on the shoot one day.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Jan Nelson: Vanessa updates us all on FB regarding festivals she has entered with the film, etc.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jan Nelson: I just moved to the Tampa área and am working on getting connected in the film and commercial industries here.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jan Nelson: Sort of – I’m not a fan of gorey stuff, but his work always has interesting psychological aspects.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jan Nelson: While I attended grad school for my MFA in Acting, I worked part-time as a radio DJ. I also am a song writer (melody and lyrics) and have collaborated on 2 full-length musicals.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jan Nelson: Can’t think of anything.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Jan Nelson: I don’t have anything else to add that I can think of.

 

 

He played in Jon Ferrari‘s Dollar Baby In The Deathroom as Fletcher.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Marco Scapillato: I am an actor/singer out of buffalo, NY. Took a serious step back into acting 2yrs ago, and havent looked back.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Marco Scapillato: I knew I wanted to be an actor when I was 8 years old, no joke. I performed at an impromtu improv challenge at my local park/rec center. I had to pretend I was an old man, so I grabbed something to act as a cain, and channelled my grandpa. Everyone laughed. It worked. I got a reaction.

SKSM: How did you become involved in In the Deathroom Dollar Baby film?

Marco Scapillato: I became involved with In The Deathroom by knowing Jon actually. He cast me in a different film he was working on that wasn’t ready to start, so he called and asked if I’d play the journalist in Deathroom, and I said yes, the fact that it was a Stephen King story made it easy.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Marco Scapillato: The story attracts people because it’s a scenerio that we could all find ourselves in and not see it coming. And how it ends attracted me. Against all odds, how does this guy end up?

SKSM: You worked with Jon Ferrari on this film, how was that?

Marco Scapillato: Working with Jon was a great experience, no drama. I was able to let go and sink my teeth. I needed to have that and this was me getting on a set and acclamating myself.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Marco Scapillato: I lost it and broke into laughter when we were shooting. I had to get it out of my system. I ruined takes, but it was ok.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Marco Scapillato: I am still in contact with Jon. We became tight. I love the guy and I run into other cast mates here and there.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Marco Scapillato: Lately I have been busy with acting gigs, thankfully. I just shot three projects back to back. One in rochester, and one here. I also just got back from shooting a project in Atlanta. These are paid gigs with crews.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Marco Scapillato: I’m one of three in the world that has not read Stephen King. Im not a big reader but I fantasize about reading his library. I always wonder where to start. I often ask, but I havent begun.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Marco Scapillato: People would be surprised to know that I am a realtor.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Marco Scapillato:Thanks for listening. Go check out our little movie, In the Deathroom. And follow me on Instagram @marcoscapillato

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