Social

   

Archives

  • 60
  • 523
  • 4,511
  • 22,363
  • 1,007,228

She played in Juan Reinoso’s Dollar Baby Flowers For Norma as Norma.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Katie Honaker: I am an actress, teacher, wife and mother living in Brooklyn, New York. I teach speech at The Atlantic Acting School for first year NYU Tisch ​students.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Katie Honaker: I think it had something to do with making people laugh. It’s still one of the best feelings in the world. It probably first happened in school as a child and being the class clown.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Flowers for Norma Dollar Baby film?

Katie Honaker: Juan Reinoso and I had worked on another short film together (and a few other projects) and he asked me to do it and I said yes, because Juan is awesome.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Katie Honaker: It’s a classic tragic love story with a twist. People love a good surprise!

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Katie Honaker: I didn’t audition but I don’t think it was written directly for me. Juan just asked me. Very lucky for me!

SKSM: You worked with Juan Reinoso on this film, how was that?

Katie Honaker: Juan is so great! He has great vision and knows how to talk to actors because he is one too. He has a great sense of humor and really cares about everyone on set. It’s always a fantastic experience working with Juan!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Katie Honaker: I met a wonderful actress Catherine Mueller-Melwani (she plays the blonde gal at the end) while working on this film and we are still friends today!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Katie Honaker: I’m still in contact with Juan and Catherine.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Katie Honaker: These days I am working a lot in commercial voice overs and am actively pursuing theater, film, and tv roles. And I am still teaching at Atlantic.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Katie Honaker: I have never read any Stephen King because I am not a fan of horror but I know people who love his work so I’m sure it’s brilliant.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Katie Honaker: I’m not sure if there is anything terribly surprising about me! Maybe that I’m an excellent swimmer and I was pre-med for a while in college. 🙂

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Katie Honaker: Hope lots of people get to see the film!

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Katie Honaker: Thanks for inviting me to interview!

 

She played in Mike Johnston’s Dollar Baby Here There Be Tygers as Miss Bird.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Wynn Siu: I am a middle aged Chinese female. I do some acting for interest. I played Miss Bird in Here There Be Tygers.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Wynn Siu: I did not have any interest in acting and never thought I would act. I only discovered acting a few years ago by accident.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Here there be tygers Dollar Baby film?

Wynn Siu: I saw the casting notice for Tygers on line. I loved the character of Miss Bird. I submitted and auditioned. I was very happy when I was offered the role.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Wynn Siu: I remember the feeling of coldness, uncertainties and fear when going to the school bathroom alone as a little kid. So, I think most people can relate to this story. Of course, most of us had the experience of having a mean teacher like Miss Bird.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Wynn Siu: I definitely had to audition for it.

SKSM: You worked with Mike Johnston on this film, how was that?

Wynn Siu: He was very easy to work with. He was very patient. He was a big teddy bear!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Wynn Siu: It was a little more than a year ago now. What I remember most was how dedicated the crew members were. It was snowing and freezing cold outside & they were still out there organizing and moving the equipments. We had an unusually cold and snowy December last year.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Wynn Siu: I received updates about the film from Mike from time to time. I also ran into a few students who were crew members last year, but now directing their own project this year.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Wynn Siu: Yes, but sometimes the suspense or horror was so intense that I had to put the book down. One time, I had to turn off the TV and switch on all the lights.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Wynn Siu: I don’t have any training in acting and I was not even in a school play before.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Wynn Siu: Thank you for reading!

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Wynn Siu: Miss Bird is my most favourite character so far. It is probably because I never get to be so mean and evil in real life. I am very fortunate to be cast in the role

 

He is the man behind Mute Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Michael Carvaines: I am a writer, director, and producer with a passion for feature narrative films. I am now pursuing a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Film Production at the Savannah College of Art and Design. Prior to that I lived in Los Angeles, where I worked for such companies as DreamWorks and New Line Cinema creating marketing and advertising campaigns for nearly 100 feature films.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Michael Carvaines: I have chased the dream for nearly 20 years. It became an obsession after I wrote my first screenplay and produced my first independent film. The entire process is a joy that remains a thrill no matter the size or scope of the production.

SKSM: When did you make Mute? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Michael Carvaines: Mute was produced in the Fall of 2016 with editing completed in the Spring of 2017. It was a class assignment for my production course, where the class of 15 Graduate Students all participated in every crew position. Each student contributed $120.00, giving us a total budget of $1,800. The production lasted 4 days, with a couple extra reshoot dates.

SKSM: How come you picked Mute to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Michael Carvaines: Mute was chosen out of nearly 50 short stories written by Stephen King. As a class assignment, each student read 3 stories and presented them to the class. We then voted on the best story to produce. Mute had the best balance of suspense and mystery, yet also feasible for a class to shoot on a limited budget. Personally, I was drawn to the unreliable narrator and potential to mislead the audience in a suspenseful story.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Michael Carvaines: Our Professor knew from the first day, and based the whole course around this deal. His intent was to give us a quality story already established in order for us to focus on developing our production technique.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Michael Carvaines: In adapting the story into a film, I added several sequences that are not in King’s text. One in particular involved showing Monette’s state of mind by illustrating a fantasy flashback. This is the hotel room scene showing his wife and Cowboy Bob where it rains down lottery tickets and women’s underwear. Not only did we have to buy many bras and panties, we then had to figure out a way to effectively make them “rain.” Needless to say this scene required more takes than any other.

Also, for the church scenes we built a large wooden confessional. I ended up keeping this confessional at my house for nearly a year. .  . just in case we ever needed to shoot additional scenes. It’s the obsessive/fearful nature of filmmaking.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Michael Carvaines: I actually don’t know the extent that audiences can view the movie. I’m not familiar with the legal fine print restricting our deal.

 

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Michael Carvaines: I am now in the process of submitting the movie to various festivals across the United States and awaiting to be accepted for the American premiere.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Michael Carvaines: Yes, I’ve read his work throughout my whole life. It’s amazing, he’s the writer that never goes away. He was popular in my youth, and now is having a resurgence. I’ve read such works as The Shining, Doctor Sleep, Needful Things, The Green Mile, and Mr. Mercedes. And of course I’ve seen many movies. I highly recommend reading The Shining while staying in a hotel.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Michael Carvaines: I have had no contact with Mr. King. I am very curious to know if he’s seen it.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Michael Carvaines: I would love to develop Mute into a feature. The characters are rich and the narrative threads can all be developed further. Building the suspense, keeping the audience guessing, and testing the narrator’s reliability. It can truly be a modern Hitchcockian experience.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Michael Carvaines: I am in pre-production on my Graduate Thesis Film entitled Magnolia Kane, which is a short suspense thriller in the style of Alfred Hitchcock, David Fincher, and yes Stephen King. I wrote the screenplay and will be Directing. We start filming in mid-January.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Michael Carvaines: If I wasn’t a filmmaker I would be a winemaker.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Michael Carvaines: I appreciate your support and hope you will continue to spread the word. Please keep an eye out for my future films and follow me on Instagram (@spectacleandtruth) and Twitter (@MicarPro). Thanks!

Title: Rest area (2018) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: ?
Director: Sean A. Skinner
Script: Dena Pech
Cast: Emily Frandemburgh, Brandon Van Vliet, Ryan Kiser, Edward Linder, Sean A. Skinner, Kurt Peterson, Jimmy Keebs, Laura Mahler, John Zdechlik, Adam Carter, Margie Zdechlik, Ericka Lauder, John Lauritsen.
Trailer
Web imdb Facebook Twitter Crowdfunding

 

He is the man behind I Am The Doorway Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Simon Pearce: My name is Simon Pearce and I’m a director based in the UK. I work pre-dominantly as a freelance editor right now and alongside that direct my own shorts and features. My latest film is a 20 minute adaptation of the short story “I Am the Doorway”, by Stephen King.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Simon Pearce: It was from quite an early age, both my parents are in the industry which I think gave me a natural interest, and certainly by the time I was 10 or 11 I knew directing is what I wanted to do. I started shooting a short film one day with a friend, just with the family video camera, simply because we were bored – and instantly fell in love with the whole process.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of I am the doorway or some updates?

Simon Pearce: Sure. So we shot the film in Scotland in March 2017, and have been working on the post production ever since. The film was picture locked by the end of summer, and since then we’ve been focusing on the film’s visual effects, sound design and music. We estimate it will be completed by the end of January 2018.

We have some amazing people working with us on this project, from the cast; Simon Merrells (Knightfall, Spartacus: War of the Damned) and Grant Masters (Silent Witness, Rome), to the incredible people behind the scenes such as our director of photography Phil Méheux (Casino Royale, The Mask of Zorro) and my producing partner Wolfram Parge. All of them have been incredibly supportive of the project despite this being a short and the budget limitations that come with that!

SKSM: How come you picked I am the doorway to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Simon Pearce: The story was actually first brought to my attention by one of the three screenwriters who adapted it, Jeffrey Stackhouse. He contacted me having acquired the rights for the dollar baby, and asked if I’d be interested in directing. He saw my horror feature film “Judas Ghost” at a festival in Los Angeles, where we both met, and that’s what led him to me for this project. After we spoke I went out and read the book which I loved. Obviously King’s writing is superb, but also the story felt so different compared to other stories I’d seen/read in that genre, plus the fact that it was this actually quite large scale science fiction story, distilled down to two people on a beach. The idea that it is in fact us that are the monsters from the point of view of these (potentially) alien visitors, and indeed the interpretation that this might all be in the head of our protagonist – there was a lot going on beneath the surface that I knew would be fun to explore and I loved the adapted script that Jeffrey and his two writing partners Wendy and Richard had written.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Simon Pearce: That again was down to Jeffrey, I had never heard of it before I must confess, but I think it’s a great scheme that Stephen King has set-up and offers a great opportunity to aspiring film-makers.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there won’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Simon Pearce: Well I certainly hope that they can! That is one drawback of the dollar baby in that it’s potential exposure, certainly initially, is limited to festivals – but I know there’s been incidences in the past where a limited online screening for a short period has been allowed, so fingers crossed that’s something we can obtain. We certainly plan to try! Our hope is that King himself sees it and something can be worked out (provided he likes our take!). As for festivals we of course plan to take it to as many places and countries around the world as we can. The horror/independent film community is one I’ve found to be incredibly supportive in the past, and I’d certainly love to show it to as many people as possible. We’re still completing the film but are very proud of what we have.

SKSM: I guess it’s very soon to asking this question but… where the premiere will be? Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Simon Pearce: We’ll be setting up premieres in London and the US for sure and will be submitting to a variety of festivals, so again this will hopefully offer lots of people the opportunity to see the finished article. The best way to keep up to date is via our social media, @doorway2017 or facebook.com/iamthedoorway2016.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Simon Pearce: I am although shamefully I must admit that’s down more to the movie adaptations I’ve seen more than books I’ve read, simply because I haven’t read that many. I am currently reading ‘IT’ which I’m really enjoying (if you can use that word about a horror novel!) and it’s the story that has probably resonated most with me. I did really enjoy the latest adaptation of that too. The original TV movie with Tim Curry terrified me when I first saw it! I still have the odd dream about that damn clown now!

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories in the future? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Simon Pearce: I’d love to! It’s a great genre to play in and he’s the master! There’s no immediate plans but I’d actually love to do a feature adaptation of ‘Doorway’, I’m pretty sure our three writers are keen too…. so who knows, perhaps if it goes very well!!

SKSM: Are you working on another project besides this one?

Simon Pearce: I have a few things in development – an action/thriller entitled “Blood Valley” and another called “Burner”, one of which ideally I’ll be shooting next year. Action is another favourite genre of mine.

I’m also about to complete the second and final season of a science fiction web series called “Horizon”, which I worked on as director, writer and producer along with a close friend of mine and fellow director Paul Dudbridge. We released the first series online in 2015 and the next will be out around February of 2018. You can watch all the episodes so far at www.horizonwebseries.com.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Simon Pearce: Perhaps the fact that until I was in my early twenties the horror genre was one I completely ignored! Not out of any ill feelings toward it, simply because I was a bit of a wimp when I was younger and so tended to avoid them! This hopefully also explains my shocking Stephen King pedigree until recently! When I made a horror feature in 2012 I started watching a lot more of them as preparation and am now really into the genre! I hope horror fans will forgive me for being late to the party!

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Simon Pearce: Mainly just to get out there and do it! The tools you need to do it are so much more accessible now and, no matter what you shoot, everything you make gives you invaluable experience looking back. I used to make shorts in my teens which were basically just myself and some friends running around the woods with BB guns, but it still teaches you a lot about shot placement, editing, orientation – how to improvise on set if what you’ve planned isn’t possible etc… It all helps to fine tune your intuition.

Don’t be afraid to help out on other peoples projects too – be it a music video, a commercial, another short, even filming your friends wedding! Again the experiences you gain will all help you down the line on your own shoots.

Finally I’d maybe say not to run before you can walk – what is happening now that its much easier to go out and shoot something, is people who’ve perhaps not done much in the past are diving right into features or other projects that are hugely ambitious – and you don’t want such a steep learning curve with so many variables if you’re fairly new to it. Make some smaller things first, make your mistakes – hone your craft, and then you can go to town!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Simon Pearce: Haha, well not sure how many people that would be aimed at in truth, simply thanks for reading and watching and if you want to see the film keep an eye on our social media channels for the latest! You can also follow me @cbaproductions if you really want to, I try to keep that pretty up to date with what I’m doing!

I wanted to make films because of the adrenaline and emotion I always experience watching films myself, to know someone, somewhere has seen and enjoyed my work will always be the most gratifying thing, so thanks to those audiences and people I’ve had the opportunity to speak with in the past, and to people like yourself for helping to push independent film!

SKSM: Would you like to add something?

Simon Pearce: Just a huge thanks to my amazing cast and crew for making this film possible! It would never have happened were it not for their support, and thanks to Jeffrey for first putting his faith in me to direct this adaptation.

Thanks so much again for the intervew and I hope you enjoy the movie when you see it!

 

 

She played in Ashley Good’s Dollar Baby In The Deathroom as Matilda Heinz.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jennifer Smythe: My name is Jen! I’m an actor as well as a Singer/Songwriter

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Jennifer Smythe: I knew at the age of 8. My father had put me into ballet when I was a little girl and turns out it wasn’t really my thing. I remember taking my first acting class and I’d never ever felt so alive before

SKSM: How did you become involved in In the deathroom Dollar Baby film?

Jennifer Smythe:  I worked with Ashley Good on a previous film called ‘Pity Party’ and she told me about this Project and I thought it sounded so cool.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Jennifer Smythe:  The cool thing about ‘In the Deathroom’ is Ashley Good totally put her own quirky twist on it. I would say what attracts people to it is the obvious suspense and creepiness of the story and plus people enjoy watching movies and getting creeped out!

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Jennifer Smythe:  No, I did not have to audition for the role.

SKSM: You worked with Ashley Good on this film, how was that?

Jennifer Smythe:  Awesome! Ashley is so down to earth and not to mention has a secret talent for make-up too, which you will see.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jenniffer Smythe:  I thought that the gory make-up and fake blood was pretty cool. Oh, and it was around Halloween when we shot the film and the theatre we were in was haunted, but no ghosts showed up. Maybe they were camera shy?

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Jennifer Smythe: Yes! Just saw a few of those people at a screening a few days ago! I hope we all get to work together again.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Jennifer Smythe: I’m working in the hospitality industry as well as focusing on acting, singing and writing music

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jennifer Smythe: Absolutely. I used to be obsessed with ‘Carrie’ when I was a little girl which my mom thought was really strange.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jennifer Smythe: I’m obsessed with cats.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jennifer Smythe: Thank you so much Reading this interview and I hope you enjoy our film ‘In The Deathroom’

 

He played in Christopher Birk‘s Dollar Baby Willa as Phil Palmer.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Theodore Bouloukos: I’m Theodore Bouloukos, and I’m an actor based in New York City.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Willa Dollar Baby film?

Theodore Bouloukos: I was cast traditionally, through the audition process.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Theodore Bouloukos: The fact that a ghost story is really a love story, I suspect.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Theodore Bouloukos: I auditioned, yes, as I mentioned previously.

SKSM: You worked with Christopher Birk on this film, how was that?

Theodore Bouloukos: This was his first directorial effort, so he was very collaborative in his approach to developing each character, which was quite nice. He was very professional and solicitous. I enjoyed working with him.

 SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Theodore Bouloukos: Well, owing to budgetary reasons we were forced to shoot in two stretches, in June and then in August. But I had another role for which I had to shave my beard, so when we resumed shooting Willa in August our makeup lady had to find and fasten (with glue) a beard resembling mine; and its texture was so clearly not my own, I found it amusing to wear.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Theodore Bouloukos: I remain quite close to the cinematographer Nathaniel Kramer, who made Willa an absolute visual feast. We’ve since worked together on a TV pilot and another film. He’s really a buddy of mine. The actress, Susan Kirby, who played my wife remains connected to me through social media, as do Christopher and the assistant camera, Lewis Smithingham; actually, Lewis is another friend with whom I have fairly regular contact.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Theodore Bouloukos: I have numerous film projects in various states; others hitting the festival circuit; and my own participation in a documentary that a lovely British filmmaker, called Charlie Williams, is doing about me and my life as an actor. He was the editor of a film of mine, called Bag Boy Lover Boy, and he somehow found me worthy to pursue as a subject: that of struggling, working New York actor. I think my being one at age 55 intrigued him more so than the usual fodder that feeds this trope.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Theodore Bouloukos: I’m a fan of his critical writing and short stories, mainly; which I realize receive less import than his novels, especially those adapted to screen.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Theodore Bouloukos: No, I think you covered the waterfront, as they say. Thanks!

 

He played in Joseph T. Kramer’s Dollar Baby Role Play as Lee.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Daniel Dutot: My name is Daniel Dutot and I am an actor currently living in New York City. I was born and raised in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Daniel Dutot: I was lucky growing up to live in a town that supported the arts and that had a summer program for kids of all ages. I had started out in the technical side of things (lighting, set building, etc.) but I started getting involved in both comedic and dramatic acting and I realized that I have to be pursuing acting or else I’m not really living a life I want to live. Sounds dramatic, right?

SKSM: How did you become involved in Role play Dollar Baby film?

Daniel Dutot: I had worked on a MSUM student film called The Extramazing Extradventures of Extraman and Extragirl (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLTnk3D2cKg) that Patrick Thompson had also worked on and he asked me if I’d like to do his Dollar Baby project a few months later, which I graciously accepted.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Daniel Dutot: I think people always believe that deep down they’re a good person, a hero, but they rarely get the chance to prove that. Nick’s character, familiar with the ‘heroes call’ through roleplaying games, gets a chance to do the right thing (albeit in a slightly dark way).

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Daniel Dutot: Patrick offered me the part (I guess I have a natural unlikeability to me haha) so I like to think he had me in mind.

SKSM: You worked with Joseph T. Kramer on this film, how was that?

Daniel Dutot: Joey and I had also worked with on the The Extramazing Extradventures of Extraman and Extragirl, with him playing one of the henchman I fought. I choreographed our fight so I had a lot of respect for Joey and his work ethic. Nick (the hero of Role Play) also played a henchman in that project.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Daniel Dutot: A special moment was that I lived about an hour’s drive from where we shot so Patrick was so kind as to drive me to the shoot and back. I had just been cast in a production of Assassins as John Wilkes Booth so I offered to pay for Patrick and his girlfriend’s ticket to my show when they saw it. It was great to have them support me and to pay them back. Also, since my character was engaged to Cat’s character, we jokingly shot a fake engagement photo with our makeup still on.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Daniel Dutot: Cat is afraid of spiders, so occasionally I’ll send her an article about spiders to tease her (maybe I AM a jerk deep down haha) and we’re all connected on social media so I’m secretly stalking what they’re doing next.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Daniel Dutot: Most recently I was Ananias Dare in The Lost Colony which is America’s oldest symphonic drama. I had the opportunity to do some intense stage combat (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SC22JyWKNxM, I’m the one in red) and I’m currently studying to be an Actor Combatant with the Society of American Fight Directors.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Daniel Dutot: I am. I remember reading It  in high school and in college enjoying The Dark Tower series.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Daniel Dutot: I can handle cold weather extremely well.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Daniel Dutot: I would like to say ‘thankee sai’ to the Stephen King fanbase and to Óscar Garrido for the opportunity to talk about this project.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Daniel Dutot: Follow me on Instagram and Twitter @danieldutot

 

She played in Ashley Good’s Dollar Baby In The Deathroom as Lady Stien.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mariah Dupuy: I am an esthetician/stay at home Mom by trade, and hopeful actor on the side. My dream is to become a full on working actor one day, as it is definitely my passion.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Mariah Dupuy: I have always had a big interest in film and was involved in the drama club in high school, but wasn’t able to fully commit to learning the craft until recently. I take regular weekly acting classes and attend as many workshops as I can in order to improve my abilities as an actor. I love every minute of it!

SKSM: How did you become involved in In the deathroom Dollar Baby film?

Mariah Dupuy: I had done some background work on a previous film of director Ashley Good’s called Pity Party, and she felt I was right for the part of Lady Stien for In The Deathroom. When she invited me to be a part of it I jumped at the chance.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Mariah Dupuy: This is an unconventional telling of In The Deathroom, and when I read the script I was all in. I thought Ashley’s take on it was quirky and definitely outside the box, something that is really fun to be involved with as an actor. I think telling the story from a different perspective is what will draw people to this film.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Mariah Dupuy: While I didn’t have to audition for the part I don’t think it was so much written for me as I just fit the picture Ashley had in her head of the character.

SKSM: You worked with Ashley Good on this film, how was that?

Mariah Dupuy: Working with Ashley was awesome. She is such a nice person, everything was very low pressure, and she was fun so you can’t beat that!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mariah Dupuy: The theatre that we filmed in is rumored to be haunted. I kept hoping we would see or hear something (it would be fitting seeing as we were filming a Stephen King story), but alas, no ghosts showed their faces. 😉

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Mariah Dupuy: We are all in touch via social media, and hopefully will have the chance to work together again.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Mariah Dupuy: I am currently focused on my classes and submitting for roles, the actor’s life!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Mariah Dupuy: I am a fan of his work, and one of my very favourite books is 11.22.63, loved it!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Mariah Dupuy: One thing people might be surprised to know about me is that I am actually quite an introvert. It’s funny to think of an actor as being introverted but I really am, and acting really pushes me outside of my comfort zone, maybe that’s why I like it so much.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mariah Dupuy: Thank you for reading this interview and I hope you like our little rendition of In The Deathroom.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Mariah Dupuy: Thank you for taking the time to interview me, it was really fun!

 

He is the man behind Šedá Hmota Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Erik Richard  H: Hi, my name is Erik Richard and I’m a… video-maker. I’ve studied film, I teach film, I’ve screened films, wrote about films and I make films – or audiovisual works in general. As a writer, director, editor, production assistant – what ever is needed for a particular project.

SKSM: When did you make Šedá hmota? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Erik Richard H: Šedá hmota, a.k.a. Gray Matter, was my final Masters project and.. it’s still in post-production since early 2016. It had a complicated production, since I had new crew, new actors.. and I like to always try something new, set myself unique challenges. In this case I decided to make a horror film that would rely on lighting, physical special effects and would follow the script precisely. You know, before, I trained myself in shooting, I’d say, fluidly – using as few lighting sources as possible, taking just light equipment, improvising and using non-actors, often changing whole scenes on set. This filming itself took altogether a week, it cost around 50000 CZK, which is around 2000 dollars, I think and except for one major case the cast was all professional actors and setting a set often took two hours. But in the end I think we got a solid material – working well on the level of aesthetics, mood and enjoyable storytelling and now there are a few adjustments that need to be done on the opening, ending credits, music and a few visuals and finally, we will start submitting to film festivals. That should be by the end of December.

SKSM: How come you picked Gray matter to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Erik Richard H: Well, I’ve always definitely wanted to make a King adaptation, The Monkey, especially. And when it was the last year of my studies, I decided to enjoy it and so I asked my brother, Jakub Sivan, with whom I work on films, whether he’d be interested in making a King movie. Him, as also a huge fan of King’s works, agreed and then we agreed on adapting Gray Matter. It felt like the most convenient pick, on one hand considering the limits of student filmmaking and on the other it was what we loved – a physical creepy tale from the countryside with all the trashy moments and weird characters.. you know, we both grew up mainly in the countryside – plus it, the story, we felt had a perfectly actual message: a violent power that comes from the countryside, its people and its beer, to spread destruction all over – just like the movement of white power is strenghtening again across the countries, not just Czech republic and Europe.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Erik Richard H: I think it must’ve been mentioned in some King’s introduction to one of his books. I just knew it from my childhood and already at high school I googled the Dollar Babies webpages, looking at the forms and requirements.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Erik Richard H: From my experience, shooting a film is always about memorable moments and this was no different. What was shocking and sad, for example, was how pretty much all the locations disappeared after the film was shot – two houses that served as the main antagonist’s house changed, one – which was in fact our house – changed the owner and the other went through reconstruction so you can’t see the places anymore. The saddest was the case of one of two pubs, that stood in for the pub from the story – after the shoot, the place was robbed entirely. The owner had to close the spot then, as it was just a place for a few last loyal customers, without enough money and profit to buy all the things again. The least we could do, the film is dedicated to him.

But from the bright side – during the time we were making our adaptation, the other one, the first Czech King adaptation by Robin Kasparik was being finished and so our crew, we took it sort of as a challenge. We were monitoring all the news from their side and told each other unofficial news that somebody got from different sets, as people meet and the nerd gossip spreads around. And all of that challenged us to do the best we could. The story ends with a funny coincidence – I’ve met the director and the cinematographer of I Am the Doorway, the other King film, when they wanted to test the film before its premiere at Prague Shorts – you know, at the time I worked as a projectionist at a cinema and so it was a great coincidence, that I got the chance to see the challenging film and also to chat with the director abou making dollar babies, alternative horrors.. and it was also great push to get serious with the post-production, as I got some pretty good tips and – I Am the Doorway was stunning.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Erik Richard H: I don’t know now. Of course I’d be happy to share the film with broader audience through internet for example. But I don’t know what are the options now. After a proper festival tour I will definitely request the option – and we’ll see.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Erik Richard H: Yet just a preview was screened at my Masters screening, at the academy. There the reactions were completely mixed. Some hated the film for its non-traditional narrative, framing and mixture of genres, but some praised it for being atmospheric and highly popcultural fun ride.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Erik Richard H: I will just see, what’s up. Horror film festivals interest me the most though, for their dedicated audience.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Erik Richard H: Definitely yes. I grew up reading all his short stories and the Shining and It.. lots of memories connected to that. However the most I admire his book On Writing and all the introductions, notes – where he just writes personally, sharing his insights and jokes.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Erik Richard H: No contact so far. All the contact I had was with the agency – though I’d obviously be interested in King’s feedback. Maybe he’d get a chance to see the film. Who knows?

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Erik Richard H: As I said earlier, I would love to adapt the Monkey one day…

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Erik Richard H: There’s maybe too much going on now with me. I just finished my last shows for a Czech television called Tuty and started working as a Junior Producer for a post-production company. Outside of that I also do freelance directing and editing of music videos and TV shows plus I’m gathering material for a feature lenght documentary and finishing script for a feature lenght fiction film, a contemporary teenage body horror.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Erik Richard H: Hm.. I think not many people know that originally I wanted to be a scientist – Dr. Brown from Back to the Future being my role model thorought my childhood.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Erik Richard H: Are there really my fans? (haha) No, seriously, really big thanks to every one, who supports me, as well as other emerging creative people – every comment, message, view, etc. means a lot!

 

 

1 2 3 56

Magazine