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He is the Cinematographer of Dan SellersUncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Zack Fox: Hello, I am Zack Fox, Winston-Salem, NC based photographer and cinematographer. I served as the cinematographer on Wreak Havoc Productions ‘Uncle Otto’s Truck’ and many other projects with them.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a cinematographer?

Zack Fox: I’ve grew up shooting on my family’s old film camera. It’s aways just been my thing.

SKSM: How do you communicate with a director to design a visual strategy for a film?

Zack Fox: I’ve been the DP for the team behind Wreak Havoc Productions (Dan Sellers and Sammie Cassell) several times now. We all work great together.

Dan and I have developed a nice on set short hand and trust. He lets me take nice creative liberties.

SKSM: You worked with Dan Sellers on this film, what do you think the relationship between a director and a dp should be?

Zack Fox: I pitched an idea of using a weird mixture of Tilt Shift and Wide Angle lenses for the film, shooting on the Canon R. Dan and Sammie completely supported it. I think everyone was very please with how it came out.

SKSM: You worked in a Dollar Baby based on a Stephen King short story. It was your most challenging film?

Zack Fox: The most challenging aspect of the film we were 15 plus miles from any electrical, running water, and zero cell service.  The house we shot in had no power. Everything had to be powered by batteries or generators. A single light would attract every bug for 10 miles. But no one complained, everyone had a great time and got the job done. 

SKSM: When you’re going to shoot, what are your favorite lenses? formats?

Zack Fox: When shooting for films, my go to favorite camera is the RED Gemini (Although, rarely is it budget friendly) It’s small, mighty, and the dual sensitivity is both the beauty and the beast.

For photography, I have always have in my go bag a Fuji X100F, Canon 5D Mark iii, 24-70mm canon micro, and 70-200mm canon f2.8.

I also modified a kit of 35mm anamorphic film projector lenses into camera lenses, but needless to say – focusing isn’t easy.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Zack Fox: As for special moment… I think the obvious answer is Mike Burke and Devlin Burke – father and son actors playing Otto. I’ve worked with Mike several times and he’s a leading caliber actor. I can definitely say Devlin will be too. For the early parts of the film we have Devlin playing young Otto, later in the film we have his father, Mike. There’s a great scene in the film where you see young Otto change to old Otto, it’s fun to watch the actors change in a blink and see the striking resemblance. It’s nearly seamless. No special events or make up needed to make the audience understand it’s the same character. It’s just father and son. Dan made a great choice when casting both of them.

SKSM: Who are some of your influences (favorite dps/films)?

Zack Fox: My influences for DPs would have to start with Thomas Del Ruth and his extraordinary work on ‘The West Wing’. Some of my core memories of love of filmmaking/cinematography began with this show. Two Cathedrals, Noel and Arctic Radar are among my favorite episodes by him. Another core memory of influence would be when watching 1998’s ‘Meet Joe Black’.  Emmanuel Lubezki work on that film still holds up to one of my all time favorites, it inspires me every single time. As for more recent/current work, Greig Fraser has to be my favorite. For one, his cinematography in Rouge One is outstanding and by far, far (away) my favorite work on any Star Wars.

His color palettes, subtle camera movement and lens choices are always flawless. I can get lost in his technique.  I can’t wait to see what he does on Disney + for The Mandalorian.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Zack Fox: I’ve honestly never have read the story Uncle Otto’s Truck Story before filming the movie. When Dan first pitched the dollar baby to me I thought it was some kind of evil ‘Tow Mater’ from Disney’s Cars story. After the project was green lit, I read the story. I’ve read many of Kings novels, although my person favorite novel of his is is his memoir, ‘On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft’. I really love King’s own story and where he comes from. You learn a lot about him and from him. That’s an excellent book for anyone wanting to get into the ‘arts’ of any kind. I personally used that memoir as more source material and story mind set more than the Skeleton Crew collection.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Zack Fox: I’m finishing up post-production on my new short film that I wrote and directed, Sea Salt Wind. The film is a drama about mistakes, love, flawed people and self-penance. I co-produced the film with Wreak Havoc Productions. We’re planning on shopping this short film around at festivals as a trailer to help find funding for a full feature film version. Uncle Otto’s Truck and Sea Salt Wind’s principal photography were only weeks apart. Michael Burke, Tom Gore, Jennie Stencel all have small cameo roles in this too.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Zack Fox: I’m a co-owner of a movie theater.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Zack Fox: Thank you for taking the time to read this and I hope you enjoyed the film! You can find more on this film and my other work on Instagram @charmfoxphotowsnc.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Zack Fox: Thanks again!

 

He is the man behind The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark Hensley: I have worked in the audio post industry for 25 years as a re-recording mixer. In 2018 I recieved an Emmy for my work on Genius Picasso.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Mark Hensley: I honestly never thought about becoming a film maker until last year. After working in the film and TV industry for so long, I think I had a pretty good idea of what good content looks like.

SKSM: When did you make The man who loved flowers? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mark Hensley: We filmed The Man Who Loved Flower two weeks ago. The cost was pretty minimal, about $1000. We did a two day shoot, pulling a lot of favors from friends and film group cohorts.

SKSM: How come you picked The man who loved flowers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mark Hensley: The reason I picked this particular story is the minimal cast and the lack of special effects requirements. Also the story has a lot of room for interpretation. The original story works really well in print, but I think that critical story points gets lost when translated literally to film. I asked my wife Peggy, who is a writer to work on it, and she wrote an excellent adaptation.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Mark Hensley: I had read about this a few years ago and it stuck in my mind. When I got a bit more confident as a director I made the decision to pursue it.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mark Hensley: My wife laying in the alley as the dead body.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Mark Hensley: I hope all his fans get the chance to see it. We will be entering it festivals around the world. Hopefully Stephen King will create a depository for the dollar baby movies that everyone can access.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Mark Hensley: No reviews yet. It hasn’t been released yet.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Mark Hensley: Really any festival we can get into.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Mark Hensley: Yes, I am a big fan. I loved Carrie and Christine as well as The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile and of course Misery.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Mark Hensley: No personal contact. He hasn’t seen it yet, but I will certainly let you know when he does

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mark Hensley: We have no plans right now, but I would love to make Mile 81. I just really like the story. I think it is really creepy

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Mark Hensley: Right now I am producing a play and I am planning to start shooting the feature film version this winter.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Mark Hensley: I directed my first short last year after never having set foot on a set before. This one was my third.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mark Hensley: To all the fans out there, if you get the chance to see the film, I hope you enjoy it

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Mark Hensley: Anyone who wants to make a film, but thinks they can’t. Just do it.

She played in Dan Sellers’ Dollar Baby Uncle Otto’s Truck as The Narrator.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jenny Stencel: I’m a comedian and a mom.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Jenny Stencel: Since I was maybe 7 I knew I wanted to perform.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby film?

Jenny Stencel: Dan and Sammie approaches me about the movie and I had never read this particular story.

They send it over and I was like “Yes! When do we start?!”

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Jenny Stencel: The film was a lot of fun to make. The cast and crew are so talented and easy going. Lot of really wonderful teamwork.

Filming in a quasi abandoned house in the middle of summer was tough. It Was Hot!!!

SKSM: You worked with Dan Sellers on this film, how was that?

Jenny Stencel: I’d make another movie with this crew anytime!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jenny Stencel: I’ve been mostly running my comedy club, The Idiot Box since filming and performing standup.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jenny Stencel: Hm… I dunno if people are surprised about anything about me.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jenny Stencel: People are really fascinated with this film. Everyone wants to see it.

 

He is the man behind Rest Stop Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark Zimmerman: My name is Mark Zimmerman and I am from Sydney, Australia. I am a factory worker as my day job but in my spare time I write script’s and Direct and dabble in a bit of acting as well.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Mark Zimmerman: Well I’ve always been a writer for as long as I can as I can remember, I was 10 when I wrote my first short story and it developed from there onwards and at the age of 16 I wanted to become an actor. But it was at the age of 19 when I first saw 2001 a space odyssey that this was the path I wanted to take. So I started writing screenplays and studied film making by watching many different type of films and even doing short courses in Australia and New York.

SKSM: When did you make Rest stop? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mark Zimmerman: Rest Stop was produced over a space of 2 months in April and May 2019. We shot it on weekends when cast and crew were available, so I was working around that and council permits where we shot at the actual Rest Stop area. The budget was very low around the $2,500 dollar mark, I wish I had more but we made do with what we had and made a solid 18 min short.

SKSM: How come you picked Rest stop to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mark Zimmerman: I picked Rest Stop cause it was about a man who was pulled out of his comfort zone and confronted with a situation, which of course he couldn’t face but his alter ego and that was something that stood out to me. It also had a bit of “DARK HALF” elements about it which is one of my favorite King book and Film adaptation.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Mark Zimmerman: Funny enough I stumbled across the dollar babies via facebook on a Stephen King fan page and I did a bid of research on it and thought I’d give it a shot not expecting anything and 3 days after I sent the request I received the contract, I was blown away. I never thought I’d have an opportunity to adapt a Stephen King story, especially for $1, but here we are.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mark Zimmerman: Well it was funny now, but at the time it wasn’t. The first night of shooting which was April we had a massive cold front coming in and gail force winds and the night was freezing. We managed to get most of the car scenes and the fight scenes done, then we went to lunch and during lunch the council decided to turn the lights off and that was the beginning of multiple phone calls and more freezing conditions. After 30 min’s I decided to pull the plug and reschedule, which of course the cast and crew where happy with. These things happen and you can not control the weather and the council were a pain, but we battled on and get the film made.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Mark Zimmerman: It’s a little disappointing, but I hop and this is an idea and I hope the right person is reading this, we can do a 3 volume DVD/bluray collection of the dollar baby films produced, they can be sold and proceeds can go to a charity of Stephen King’s choice. That way the world and his fans can see everyone’s talent. At the end of the day were not here to make money but just getting the opportunity to adapt a King story is a massive achievement in itself.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Mark Zimmerman: So far only a handful of people have gotten back to me saying the film is strong and passes the message through well. I’ve had a few say it is well shot, written and acted and a nice thriller. No negatives yet, but if there is any I can take it on the chin, nobody is perfect.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Mark Zimmerman: I’m on film freeway which most of my pervious films have been entered in many festivals on that site, so I am searching of the right ones and also the next Dollar babies festivals in the U.S of course when ever that may be.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Mark Zimmerman: I am a huge Stephen King fan, his earlier works are masterpieces, Pet Sematary, IT, The Stand, Dark Half, Misery, Carrie, The Shining, Salems Lot. My Favorite book is Dark Half and the film adaptation is my favorite that and The Shining. It’s hard to pinpoint just one.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Mark Zimmerman: I haven’t had person contact with Stephen King yet, would love to one day, I’ve sent him the DVD of the film still waiting his thought’s. Fingers crossed.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mark Zimmerman: I would love to do another Stephen King adaptation, I would chose one of his novels and the one I would pick would be ROSE MADDER, cause it centers around escaping violent situation only to be dragged into a world of mythology and magic and more blood shed. It doesn’t matter how far you can escape the past will catch up with you unless you make a stand. It’s is his least popular works, but I enjoyed it.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Mark Zimmerman: I am working on a feature script at the moment, a psychological horror story. Can’t say too much now as it is in it’s early stages but I’m looking forward to when it is brought to life.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Mark Zimmerman: Well, there isn’t really anything surprising about me, I live the normal everyday life, I’m just waiting for my big break whenever that may be.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mark Zimmerman: Yeah, keep reading, writing and making fantastic film’s and don’t give up on your dreams. Remember King lived in poverty for year’s and did give up, but thank god for Tabitha for fishing Carrie out of the trash basket, cause we would have no KING.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Mark Zimmerman: I hope I get to see the other Dollar baby film’s. The one thing I love about the facebook page is that everyone is supportive of one another and do not judge, and that is amazing, two thumbs up everyone hope to meet you all one day. Take care.

 

He played in Dan Sellers’ Dollar Baby Uncle Otto’s Truck as The Barber.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Sammie Cassell: My name is Sammie Cassell,  I’m 49 years old (cool fact, I was born 2 hours after Jimi Hendrix was pronounced dead), I’m vice-President of Wreak Havoc Productions, a local NC actor, an actor at the Original Hollywood Horror Show haunted house and a comic book enthusiast

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor? 

Sammie Cassell: There was a casting call on a local haunt page looking for volunteers to play zombies in a short film (Dan’s Hank vs the Undead). It was our 13th wedding anniversary so my wife, our college age daughter, one of her friends and I went. I met Dan briefly there. He cast me in a speaking part as “The Hobo” and we became fast friends and production partners and I was hooked on acting and producing from there on out.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby film?

Sammie Cassell: Dan and I were involved in a dollar baby that didn’t get off the ground a couple of years ago. I think that planted the seed for him. Unbeknownst to me, he started doing research and last year he came to me and said “let’s do a dollar baby”.  I asked which one and, he told me Uncle Otto’s Truck. I picked up my personal copy of Skeleton Crew (a 1st edition) and read it the next day.  I went back to Dan and said this is doable, but if it’s going to be in front of Stephen King it’s got to be done right.  So we started pre-production. A little later he told me that he needed someone over the top to play the barber and that fit me to a tee.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Sammie Cassell: Stephen King haha, it’s a tried and true King story. He’s got a thing about cars. From Christine to Hearts in Atlantis to From a Buick 8 to Maximum Overdrive, whatever his deal is with cars, it’s fueled his writing. To all our benefit. I’m not a huge car guy but Kings stories resonate with me. Christine is one of my favorite books and movies of all time. He’s just an amazing storyteller and Otto is a good one. Plus, it’s the only dollar baby set in Castle Rock. And that’s huge right now.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Sammie Cassell: Haha I hope not. I get a role in every film we do. Although sometimes I have to lobby for it. This one, Dan had me in mind for.

SKSM: You worked with Dan Sellers on this film, how was that?

Sammie Cassell: Dan and I have become best friends.  We collaborate on almost everything. He writes and directs, I produce and act. I’ve found I have a knack for producing.  I found the house and the truck through people I know. We’ve since brought some very talented and diverse people into our circle that we like and trust. There’s a great little group now, and we enjoy making films. Dan and I don’t always agree, but we always know where each other stands, and that’s important in any relationship.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Sammie Cassell: We always try to keep a light and fun set. We pick and carry on until it’s time to work. Jeff Cochran (one of the other producers) and I were cleaning some brush off. We both had these big machetes, I always carry a pocket knife. Dan normally does too, along with Chad Hunt, another collaborator. Well, Jeff and I walk by a van to put our machetes up and sitting in the van is Jennie, our lead actress studying her lines. She’s a city girl, and we’re in the middle of the mountains. She’s cracks the window just a bit and says “Why does everyone have weapons?” Lol. I said, because we may see critters, to which she said “That many?” haha. There are snakes and bears and raccoons, and all sorts of things up there. We needed protection. Another fun aspect was Nelson Hill. His truck, Festus, is the real star.  Festus is legit creepy, and we treated him like a real person.  Nelson appreciated it I think and he stuck with us the entire time.  And was entertaining himself.  I’ve know Nelson almost all my life.  His daughter and I are the same age.  We had fun that weekend.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Sammie Cassell: Well, with social media it’s easier, but yea. Most everyone was a friend or someone we’ve worked with frequently. Jennie was really the only outsider, but we all stay in touch. North Carolina has a very close knit film community

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Sammie Cassell: I’ve been doing some background exttras stuff. I worked on the new Halloween movie, Halloween Kills.  I’ve worked on the untitled Walking Dead spin-off.  Next spring, I’ve got a role in one feature called Can You Smell the Flowers, another one called Dark Trepidation 3 (I had a role in 2), and a small role in Killer Babes and the Frightening Film Fiasco from Brett Mullen. Other than that, I’m on the festival circuit promoting Uncle Otto, a short drama from writer/director Zack Fox (cinematographer on Otto) called Sea, Salt, Wind that we produced, and films that I’ve acted in, It’s All Fun and Games and Silent Breath and debuting in 2020, the brilliant feature Kill Giggles from Jaysen Buterin. I try to stay busy. And this is my hobby haha

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Sammie Cassell: I love Stephen King. My first year in high school, I came home after the last day of school and went to my room. There was a note from my mom that said, “I know you’ve got a summer reading list from school, but I’m giving you one too. Under that note was King’s Pet Semetary. The next year it was Christine, then IT, and it took off from there.  I devoured every King book I could.  IT is my favorite novel ever! I also really like The Stand and Cujo. I also really like most of the films. Especially The Shawshank Redemption (look for an Easter egg in Otto), the new IT, and The Shining.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Sammie Cassell: I’m also known as Sammie the Comic Book Man. I go around to schools, libraries, senior centers, wherever and do presentations encouraging people to read, specifically comic books. Every kid leaves with two books, gender based. It’s basically a show and tell. I do a section on how a comic is made, real history in comics, women creators, and when comics were almost banned.  It’s a passion project for me, and Dan did a documentary about it a while back. That’s my heart up on a screen and I’m forever indebted to him for it.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Sammie Cassell: Please check out our stuff. It’s all on social media. Like, share, all that good stuff.  We also do a podcast about movies called the Wreak Havoc Film Buffs Podcast.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Sammie Cassell: Thank you so much for giving us this outlet to promote Otto. We’re really proud of it and it’s already won 3 awards. We hope we do Mr King proud.

 

He is the man behind Mute Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Rob Darren: My name is Rob Darren  I’m a writer, producer and director. I was born a Navy brat in San Diego California. So I’ve lived in several places during my lifetime including: California, Virginia, Colorado, New York, Indiana, Nevada, and North Carolina.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Rob Darren: I have chased the dream for nearly ten years. It became an obsession after I wrote, produced, and directed my first independent film “White Paint: A Clown Story” The entire process  remains a thrill no matter the size or scope of the film production. I began working on the film sets of “Evan Almighty” and “John Adams” I was amazed watching Academy Award winning director Tom Hooper work his magic on “John Adams”. I was fortunate to be the AD (assistant director) on Ted V Mikels “Astro Zombies M3: Cloned”. Mikels was a filmmaker of 65 years and largely through him that I learned about the art of cinema.

SKSM: When did you make Mute? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Rob Darren: I started adapting the script in February 2018 and went into pre-production. We finished principle photography in June 2018. We put together an amazing crew and some very talented actors.. This was a team effort and everyone went above and beyond to make Mute a great film. We filmed over the course of 3 days and nights in Las Vegas Nevada in various locations with a budget of $6000.

SKSM: How come you picked Mute to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Rob Darren: The ending of this story is unexpected and the characters are special. The story keeps you guessing . Mute has a strong comedic tone despite it being a thriller. I wanted to bring both the comedy and suspense elements through the story. It was feasible to shoot on a limited budget.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Rob Darren: I found out accidentually on the internet.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Rob Darren: During the desert scene the camera was mounted to the hood of the car. My DP and I waited for the car to return. We thought it had fallen off, There was an issue and the actor put it in the car without us knowing at first. Scary frantic momento.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Rob Darren: I understand why Stephen King doesn’t want these films released for profit, The honor of being able to use a King story is worth it. In the future I hope everyone can watch “Mute”.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Rob Darren: They all have been very positive, especially the clever easter eggs dropped throughout the movie.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Rob Darren: We are planning on submitting to several festivals.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Rob Darren: Yes I am a fan. He has so many films based off his books. “The Shawshank Redemption”, “Salems Lot”, “It”, and my personal favorite “The Shining”.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Rob Darren: I’ve been dealing with his manager. He has not seen it due to my editor at Gazing Cat Productions polishing it up.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Rob Darren: I would love to shoot  “All that you Love will be Carried Away” Its a dark story similar to Mute and very character driven.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Rob Darren: I produced and directed my first feature “White Paint: A Clown Story”. Also was the assistant director of Ted V. Mikels “Astro Zombies M3: Cloned”. I also wrote a Laurel and Hardy feature that was accepted by Creative Artists Agency. I hope to film that someday. Also would like to create a series similar to the Twlight Zone and show works from independent students, guest directors and eventually Hollywood directors. I also to make documentaries on the presciption drug industry and Antartica, which are very personal to me.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Rob Darren: I was a dear friend of Hollywood icon Tony Curtis.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Rob Darren: Thank you for interviewing me. It has been a pleasure.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Rob Darren: I would love to develop Mute into a feature film. The characters are rich and the story can all be developed further. It can truly be a modern Hitchcock type film. I want to thank my amazing actors, great crew and everyone who helped make this posible.

He played in Paul Mortsolf‘s Dollar Baby Rest Stop as Extra.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Luis Delgado: Of course! My name is Luis Delgado and I have regular warehouse job like most. But I’m also a musician and a frontman for Southern California’s Premiere Pantera tribute Trendkill Revolution.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Luis Delgado: I’ve been in performing arts for as long as I can remember. Ever since I was a child I was in school plays or playing in a band. I was also in advanced drama classes all the way from middle school to high school. Just never “grew out” of it I guess.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Rest Stop Dollar Baby film?

Luis Delgado: I’ve been friends with Joe, Clay and Chris for well over a decade at this point. Joe and I used to work retail together and always talked about making horror movies or playing metal music together. We never lost touch and fat forward to now and were finally making it happen.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Luis Delgado: I think people relate to things that are possible. Where is easy to put yourself in the shoes of the characters and almost live vicariously through them. Plus, we all like a good scare

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Luis Delgado: Since all I did acting wise for the film was be an extra, they just asked and I came down. No lines or rehearsing was needed. As for helping with the music, Joe asked me if I wanted to lend an idea or something to the film. Having my own band and also being best friends with Doc Coyle of Bad Wolves, I asked him and my guitar player Jason Chavez to help with some ideas. They ended up suing some of those for the film and the trailer.

SKSM: You worked with Paul Mortsolf on this film, how was that?

Luis Delgado: This was my first time meeting Paul. He’s a very nice guy. Alot of the same interests as Joe and Clay, so we got along great.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Luis Delgado: Meeting Amanda Wyss was a pretty big deal for me. I’ve been a fan of her since I was a kid. We all remember the first time we saw A Nightmare On Elm Street and her death scene is beyond iconic. She was so nice and letting my wife and I geek out for a bit talking horror was alot of fun.

Plus, all the old inside jokes Joe, Clay, Chris, my wife and I had just came flooding back. So lots of laughing and goofing off in between takes and stuff.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Luis Delgado: As I said before. Joe, Clay and Chris will always be in my life. They’re stuck with me. Ha! Paul and I have kept in contact through Facebook as well as their social media manager, Brooke.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Luis Delgado: Nothing really out of the ordinary. Just the basic day to day job and also playing shows with my band. We just completed a special show for the 25th Anniversary of Pantera’s Far Beyond Driven album. We played it in its entirety.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Luis Delgado: Oh yeah! I feel everyone really should be, but horror fans in general. Hes got some of my favorite stories growing up.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Luis Delgado: There isn’t much at all really. I’m pretty blunt, so what you see is what you get.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Luis Delgado: Nothing other than keep giving indie horror a chance. Some of the best stuff we got going on right now aren’t from the big studios.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Luis Delgado: If you’re a fan of Pantera please check out my tribute band on FB at https://facebook.com/thetrendisdead and also Doc Coyle and the rest of Bad Wolves new album N.A.T.I.O.N. which came out a couple of weeks ago. And of course anything from Seven Faces Films, I’m sure Paul and guys are going to come up and surprise people with some great stuff in the future.

 

He is the man behind One For The Road Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Noah Bunyan: My name is Noah Bunyan and I am a film major at the New York School of Visual Arts studying to become a movie director. I’m a longtime fan of Stephen King and Dollar Babies was a perfect chance to merge two of my interests.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Noah Bunyan: For as long as I can remember I’ve wanted to be a filmmaker and create art for people to view and enjoy.

SKSM: When did you make One for the Road? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Noah Bunyan: I worked on One for the Road from last November to last May. The production was only about five hundred dollars and I filmed it all in two days on a set. A majority of the time I worked went into writing, casting, and editing the film.

SKSM: How come you picked One for the Road to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Noah Bunyan: I love Salem’s Lot, I love vampires, I thought I could make a dynamic bottle film with the setting and characters, and I’ve always wanted to film something with a snowstorm setting. One for the Road as a story creates this great sense of desperation and isolation and I wanted to as much as I could capture that in my film.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Noah Bunyan: I discovered Dollar Babies through a friend, and was very excited to learn that for just $1 I could direct my own film taking from Stephen King’s stories and ideas.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Noah Bunyan: There was this hilarious moment when the whole set kind of broke down for about ten minutes. I had attempted to construct a machine that would shoot fake blood through a hose out of one of the actors by their neck for an effects scene and… it didn’t work. So, there’s about ten minutes of behind the scenes footage of me trying to use my own mouth to blow the fake blood out of the hose(also didn’t work). It was a lot thicker than I thought it would be and we ended up having to water it down and rework the scene on the spot. So, that’s just one of the surprises that can happen when you don’t test the effects beforehand.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Noah Bunyan: I’m saddened that I can’t show the film I worked on to a larger audience, and hope this will change in the future. An internet/ dvd release would honestly be awesome to see, with a variety of short films from lesser known creators who are still starting out.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Noah Bunyan: I’ve received mostly positive feedback, but there have been some bad reviews. We had some problems filming, mostly on account of the low budget. It was about 500 dollars to shoot so we had to find creative ways to cut corners with making the script feasible to shoot.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Noah Bunyan: Not currently, but I’ve been looking at options.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Noah Bunyan: I’m a longtime Stephen King fan, I have been since my first year of high school. My favorite books of his are The Shining, It, Cycle of The Werewolf, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, and Salem’s Lot. The original tv miniseries version of Salem’s Lot is where I got my inspiration for what spun into some pretty unique designs for the vampires in the film, and I do love the movie Silver Bullet, which is an adaption of Cycle of The Werewolf. It’s a movie where Gary Buddy builds a rocket powered wheelchair and fights a werewolf which is exactly what I want out of my cinema. The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon hasn’t yet gotten a film adaptation, but it has a pop up book which is pretty cool.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Noah Bunyan: I did not have much contact with King during the production of the film, but I read his original short story multiple times in preparation. I also read Salem’s Lot. I just sent it in to him to watch, and I’m waiting patiently and excitedly to hear what he has to say. Hopefully good things!

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Noah Bunyan: I’m thinking about it, maybe one of the Dollar babies again? It was an amazing amount of fun doing my first dollar baby. I’ve got pitches for some of his larger or more well known stories if I ever get big in the movie industry. I have pitches for days. Salem’s Lot remake, a dark, Midsommer inspired Children of The Corn movie, a six to eight episode tv show interpretation of The Shining that could really do the book justice. Maybe I’d cut the hedge animals, but everything else from The Shining book is gold. I’d try to keep some of Kubrick’s set design and cinematography, but the book has a lot of untapped potential. There was a lot that didn’t make it into the movie.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Noah Bunyan: I’m working on another short film. It’s a dark comedy based around the seedy underbelly of Times Square Street Performers. I’ll probably put it up on YouTube when it’s done so you can look forward to that. I’ve also got a silent short film in the early stages. Bigfoot is in it.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Noah Bunyan: I’m a screenwriter and a director, I’m a big movie and book guy, but I have other interests. I love to draw, for example.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Noah Bunyan: Stephen King’s Dollar Babies are great, and it allows anyone to make a Stephen King movie. I 100% recommend anyone with an interest in Stephen King and filmmaking take the opportunity and hopefully someday we can get more of a release of these great films made by creators who haven’t yet made a name for themselves.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Noah Bunyan: I would like to thank the amazing cast and crew that helped me along the way making my film. I would have crashed and burned without these amazing people helping me every step of the way: Bill Kozy, Jose Sanchez, Adam Files, Chelsea Logan, Sophie Larin, Matt Yturralde, Jacob Gardner, Sharon Bar Lev, Isabella Granada, Brendan Letitzia, Ethan Hoffman, and Christopher Elzy.

She played in Will Patrick Roberts‘ Dollar Baby Morning Deliveries as Mrs. Driscoll.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Lorna Hughes: My name’s Lorna Hughes. I live on an old sheep farm in the North Wales countryside with my husband, 2 daughters, 2 dogs and a cat. There’s never a quiet moment in our house!! We’re directors in a few businesses including a brewery, pizza restaurant and wine bar so are never stuck for somewhere nice to eat and drink!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Lorna Hughes: Acting has been a big part of my life since I was at school and discovered the drama group. I was a shy child but acting really brought me out of myself and enabled me to become different people who did things I never would, which did wonders for my self confidence. That’s the thing I love most about acting.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Morning Deliveries Dollar Baby film?

Lorna Hughes: I was told by my friend and fellow actor, Landon Sweeney, that the director of the film was looking for someone to play a small role and that he’d suggested me as he knew I was a massive Stephen King fan. Naturally I jumped at the chance!

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Lorna Hughes: Everyone loves a psychopath! You certainly wouldn’t expect it to be your seemingly innocent, local neighbourhood milkman who delivers your milk on a daily basis but that’s what makes it so unexpected and terrifying!!

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Lorna Hughes: As I said above, I was suggested for the part by Landon who plays Spike the Milkman in the film and then was contacted by Will, the director.

SKSM: You worked with Will Patrick Roberts on this film, how was that?

Lorna Hughes: Will’s great, very friendly and helpful. He gave good direction and had very clear ideas of how he wanted the film to look and feel.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Lorna Hughes: Will had the idea that he wanted the film to look like it was shot in the Eighties so we had to run around the kitchen where my scene was filmed making sure there were no ítems such as Apple watches or laptops or any other anachronisms in view!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Lorna Hughes: Absolutely – I work with Landon Sweeney (Spike) and Lara Crawford (Mother) quite often on stage.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Lorna Hughes: I’m currently rehearsing the role of Laura Lyons in the Hound of the Baskervilles which will be on at Theatr Colwyn in Colwyn Bay at the end of January 2020.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Lorna Hughes: I’m a massive fan!!! I’ve read nearly all of his novels, excluding the Dark Tower series, and consider him my favourite author of all time. I’m really looking forward to seeing the film adaptation of Doctor Sleep, the sequel to The Shining, which comes out this week.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Lorna Hughes: A few years ago, I appeared on the BBC One quiz show, Pointless, with my then boss. We got through to the final but didn’t know anything about Iris Murdoch’s novels so didn’t win the money but I do have a coveted Pointless trophy!!!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Lorna Hughes: Thank you for reading and I hope you enjoy the film!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Lorna Hughes: I loved every minute of being in this film and would like to thank you for asking to speak with me.

He played in Ali Cocks’ Dollar Baby Vinton’s Lot as Tim Grunwald.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Sam Christie: I work as a documentary filmmaker, generally making socially engaged films. I’ve recently returned from Kosovo where I was making a doc and spent time in Iraqi Kurdistan in 2016 making a couple of films over there. Prior to that I worked for the environmental organisation the Centre for Alternative Technology in Machynlleth. Basically my world is generally non fiction and the last thing I thought I’d do is act in a film. My website is here if you want to know more: https://www.drsamchristie.com/

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Sam Christie: I have acting in the family, but as far as I was concerned I wanted to play music and make films. I was attracted to non-fiction. So in answer to this, I never thought I’d act really

SKSM: How did you become involved in Vinton’s Lot Dollar Baby film?

Sam Christie: Jamie Dearden, a friend of mine, secured the Dollar Baby shortly after I moved back to Wales. He thought I would make a good Tim. I wasn’t so sure, but I admire people who get things done, especially against the odds, so I agreed to be a part of it.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Sam Christie: This story is no easy story to tell filmically. Even as a fiction film virgin I could see this one would be hard to make. The story, however, like much of Stephen King’s stuff is multi-layered. He’s got some serious stuff going on in this. One of the things that I think attracted Jamie was the fact that he could show off the wonderful landscape we have here in Wales in the film. I also think that he was attracted to the intelligence of the dialogue. I mean, to adapt a script, you need something to get your teeth into.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Sam Christie: I have a horrible feeling that Jamie had me in mind all along. I still don’t know why, haha. I didn’t have to audition though as he seemed clear he could see me as an evil property shyster.

SKSM: You worked with Ali Cocks on this film, how was that?

Sam Christie: Ali is great. Now I’m not just being sycophantic here. She organised so much, made something happen with next to no money and then, when I couldn’t imagine we’d reach the finish line, collated and edited the footage. What she managed to do was find a film in what we had shot. For much of the production phase I wasn’t sure we even had a film. I’m seriously grateful to her and will work with her again in a shot.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Sam Christie: Well when we were shooting the nasty scene where I’m yelling and pointing a gun at her after every take I’d be apologising and then straight back into character to do it again. It’s weird playing a part like this. I’d say I wasn’t a psychopath but you can never know for sure. I’m pretty sure Jamie was convinced I was – after filming he might have changed his mind J

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Sam Christie: Yes. I see Ali and Jamie a lot and as for the rest of them, yes they’re a great bunch of people and I’d like to do something with them again. To be honest I’d like to see what this crew could do with a budget.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Sam Christie: I’m working on a film about Coleg Harlech, a second chance higher education college in Wales that is being sold off cheaply. It’s a complex documentary that’s been really tough to make, but I’m trying to point out that we need, more than ever, to have education and culture at the core of our societies across the world. If you want to know more, have a look at an article I wrote about the film here   https://www.planetmagazine.org.uk/planet-extra/requiem-coleg-harlech

And more importantly, if you want to make the world a better place (and you’re rich), buy the place and turn it back to what it once was

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Sam Christie: Big time. He’s a legend. What I like about Stephen King is the subtext. He’s a genius at telling an engaging story that lightly conceals a wider meaning. My love of The Shining endures and the book is so different from the film. In SK’s book the difference from the film comes out most noticably in the crazy boiler scene in my opinion. Reading his words I was in the boiler room.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Sam Christie: I wear my heart on my sleeve. I think that people know more or less all there is to know and what they don’t will stay there thanks very much.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Sam Christie: It a great idea to do this. So basically anyone, from the expereinced to the poor enthusiast can have a go at adapting this iconic writer’s work.

 

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