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She is the Producer of Hendrik HarmsAll That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers?

Chloe Brown: Hi, I’m Chloe Brown and I’m a producer proudly from the Midlands, UK.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a producer?

Chloe Brown: I actually come from a background in art department. I’ve wanted to work in film since I was a young teenager, so I went to Bournemouth Film School at 18 and ended up training primarily in production design, with some roles in production. When I graduated I worked on several indie films and a television series in various art departments but I felt like I was missing being involved in the parts of the filmmaking process and decided to go back to production. All That You Love Will Be Carried Away was my debut as a producer.

SKSM: How did you become involved in ‘All That You Love Will be Carried Away‘ Dollar Baby film?

Chloe Brown: I knew Hendrik through our art director and poster designer, Kirstie Gregory, and he had adapted the script already when he approached me about collaborating on this project.

SKSM: Can you tell us about your work in the film?

Chloe Brown: Well, due to budget constraints I actually ended up doing more roles than just producing. I was also in the art department and 1st assistant director which was incredibly stressful at times as these are all such preproduction-heavy roles. Everyone thought I was mad for being 1st AD when I was already producer but in some ways they meshed really well as dual roles. I also think a lot of the public don’t realise what producers do, and we aren’t just investors and people to fill out paperwork. We actually play a pivotal role in the narrative and creative development of the overall project.

SKSM: What was it like to work with Hendrik Harms on this film?

Chloe Brown: It was honestly great. Obviously we clashed sometimes but I think we work really well as a creative team. We are more often than not on the same page about the vision for the overall project. There’s a lot of trust there, which is imperative to a good director-producer relationship, and I feel very lucky to have found a solid collaborator so early in my career. We have since released another short film, Wild Hunt, and are developing several other projects together. We are also business partners in a non-profit film initiative which aims to inspire underrepresented groups to get into film.

SKSM: Was there any funny things that happened while filming (Bloopers, etc)?

Chloe Brown: There were so many. The cast and crew honestly had the best time shooting this, we really gelled as a team. Even at 2am in a forest, the actors were dancing or when we were all crammed into the hottest hotel room of all time, our spirits didn’t drop. I feel really strongly about workspaces being inclusive, welcoming and fun. Film sets can be incredibly stressful but I pride myself on trying to create a positive and memorable experience for everyone we employ on our shoots. A personal highlight for me were the laughs I shared with director of photography, Elliot Wallis, and gaffer, Jamie Abel, during the bathroom scenes.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Chloe Brown: Absolutely, I’ve had a bit of a thing for horror for some years now. I’m endlessly fascinated by the ways in which horror can encapsulate societal fears. I adore Carrie because it explores feminine themes I feel strongly about as well as being incredibly creepy. And I love body horror in films.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Chloe Brown: I’m working on my first documentary at the moment, actually. We were supposed to shoot the rest of the interviews last month but the coronavirus situation has halted that for the time being. I’m also in development on several other film projects including a gritty, social realist piece, a coming-of-age story exploring Britpop culture and a satirical, feminist period drama – quite a variety. Also our non-profit organisation with Hendrik as I mentioned earlier, and Worcester Film Festival. Hendrik and I are also making Isolation Shorts to raise money for NHS Charities Together. Check out the Harms Way Studios Youtube Channel to get involved!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Something you’d like to tell our readers?

Chloe Brown: I’d like to draw attention to the many injustices going on in the world right now. We are still fighting very hard for equality and a lot of that can be influenced by the media, which is why I feel so strongly about increasing representation for the LGBTQIA+ community, women, non-cisgendered people, non-white people, disabled people and those from a poorer socio-economic background. To that end, I encourage anyone from any of these backgrounds who are drawn to the film industry to please get involved! The industry is improving, but still sadly lacking in this area and I promise you the arts are for everyone. If you’d like to talk about getting into film, bounce ideas or get involved in future projects please feel free to get in touch!

 

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