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He played in Daryle Moore’s Dollar Baby Mute as Cowboy Bob.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Harold Dennis: My name is Harold Dennis I live in Chicago and I act in film.  I’ve been doing this for 20 years with an accumulated 18 years of classroom study.  I coach other actors.  I volunteer film festivals and attend film screenings as often as I can.  I love what I do, I’m living the dream.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Mute film?

Harold Dennis: My character in Mute is Cowboy Bob.  I was on the set of Fangs vs. Spurs playing a cowboy when Daryle Moore approached me and said he has me in mind for the Stephen King short Mute that he plans to shoot.   I’ve worked with Daryle a few times in the past and so I told him yes I’m interested to do it.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Harold Dennis: I think what attracts people to Mute is Stephen King.  Something else that attracts people to Mute is the mystery of what this story is about.  And I think what attracts filmmakers is the challenge of doing Stephen King himself justice, along with the film being made easily available to make.

SKSM: You worked with Daryle Moore on this film, how was that?

Harold Dennis: Daryle Moore wrote the screenplay and directed it.  He was efficient and kind.  We filmed our scenes at his home which he opened up to the entire cast and crew for the two weekends of shooting.  His wife cooked meals for us, we ate good.  There was a since of comradery and comfort.  He created an environment that made everyone want to do our very best work.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Harold Dennis: It was a special moment in the making of Mute when Daryle took my suggestion and brought my friend actor Edi Mehana on as the bartender in the film.   And in the bar scene the first time I laid eyes on Thomas A. Jackson (Mute), I was intimidated.  And when Thomas and I had our fight scene in the kitchen my fear carried over.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Harold Dennis: I still have contact with some of the cast and crew.  Social media keeps us in close contact and updated with what’s happening with each other.  Edi Mehana and I recently worked on his film “The Pride”.  I’m wrapping up on Daryle’s latest film “Scar Lake” with John Wesley Norton, Shannon Brown and Brain Barber.  Shannon Brown, North Roberts and I worked on a pilot, called “Conrad”.   Derek O’Rourke and I worked on a short film called “Pronouns”.  Pronouns screened at Tribeca and The Chicago International Film Festival. It’s currently playing on United Airline flights.  I just worked with the DP Sean Czaja last Saturday on his short and I worked with Chris O’Malley Monday of this week in Milwaukee WS.  It’s funny but it seems that a lot of us continue to connect.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Harold Dennis: Nowadays I’m working on a few projects.  You can see the list of projects here along with my acting demo reel:  www.IMDb.com/name/nm1815557  I’m fortunate to have the opportunity to work in film.  I have currently over 150 projects.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Harold Dennis: I am a fan of Stephen King.  I’ve been a fan of Stephen King since “Carrie”.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Harold Dennis: I’ve been in acting classes for an accumulated eighteen years preparing for the moment when my biggest goals come to me.  I was in acting class yesterday, opportunity meets preparation.  I’ve heard that the harder you work the luckier you get.  And my Coach of 14 years (Ted Sarantos) has said many times that it takes seventeen to twenty years to become an overnight success.  I have come to understand that to mean after doing something for so long you know what to do and things and people come along to help you along your way.  I have my ten thousand hours and consider myself an expert at doing what I do as an actor.

 

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