Social

   

Archives
  • 113
  • 506
  • 7,534
  • 16,626
  • 1,331,724

He played in Peter Sullivan‘s Dollar Baby Night Surf as Alvin (Burning Man).

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jack Erdie: I’m a reformed actor! I haven’t acted in anything for more than three years. I’m from a small town in West Virginia. I wanted to be an actor. Pittsburgh seemed like a good place to get more experience before moving to New York or Los Angeles. I acted here for eight or nine years, had a principle role in a Van Damme vehicle called Sudden Death, then moved to Los Angeles. I didn’t get many film opportunities in L.A. Then I played Dracula in a play that was horribly directed, really a sad joke. I gave up acting. Since returning to Pittsburgh, I’ve been pursuing a career as a singer-songwriter, and so far I’ve gotten a lot of local recognition. I’ve
been with the same woman, Camille, for twelve years. We have one dog and two cats.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Night Surf?

Jack Erdie: I had worked with Peter Sullivan on a short film in Pittsburgh. I forget what it was and in which capacity he served. He remembered me. When he came out to Los Angeles, we had mutual friends there, all of whom had moved West from Pittsburgh. We reconnected through those friends. He told me about the role and asked me to do it.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Jack Erdie: I don’t think I had to audition. The role was directly from the Stephen King short story, so it wasn’t written for me.

SKSM: You worked with Peter Sullivan on this film, how was that?

Jack Erdie: Peter was very capable. Young, and very mature for his age. He was focused and I knew I was in good hands. There was no petty squabbling. He gave me good, useful suggestions.

SKSM: Where there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jack Erdie: I brought a hermetically sealed vial of amber fluid onto the set and began telling people it was a supposedly inactive strand of the bubonic plague virus that I’d stolen while working for the Center for Disease Control. said I was going to drink it to try to make the role very real. A couple crew members freaked out, but Peter was smart enough to know it wasa joke.

SKSM: What did you do after Night Surf?

Jack Erdie: I did a few plays, and a few student films. I’ve only seen one of the films. I was with a theater group that Jason Patric and Amy Jo Johnson came out of for a while.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Jack Erdie: As I was getting ready to leave Los Angeles, one of the people involved with Night Surf told me they were writing a movie with a role they intended me to play. I told them, okay, when you get the go-ahead from a studio, and the money, fly me back and I’ll do it! I never heard from them again.

SKSM: Night Surf is a prequel to The Stand. Have you read/seen The Stand and what do you think of it?

Jack Erdie: I saw the mini-series of The Stand. I loved Gary Sinise. I thought it was a bizarre blend of supernatural and pandemic thriller. The plague is frightening enough. The devil, for me, only made it silly.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jack Erdie: I read a lot of Stephen King’s books when I was in high school. That’s not to say I wouldn’t enjoy them now, but I happened to go through my Stephen King binge way back when. Salem’s Lot had a profound effect on me. So did The Shining. I think Mr. King has one of the most expansive and fascinating imaginations of our age. More recently, I read his book On Writing, and found it direct, helpful, informative, and humorous. I’m always interested to see what he’s done lately.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jack Erdie: If any of you grow up to be movie directors, consider me for any particulary bizarre roles. And thanks for taking the time to read this.
Sincerely,
Jack Erdie (www.jackerdie.com)

Magazine