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He is the Composer of Michael Lamberti‘s All That You Love Will be Carried Away Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Samuel Gr Morgan: I’m an Irish composer, arranger and producer, I also write and perform songs for my own gratification but in recent times I have found myself mainly motivated as a composer and producer.

SKSM: How did you become involved with All that you love will be carried away?

Samuel Gr Morgan: Well I got introduced to the director Michael through a gentleman called Calob Robinson who I had worked with on two films, and the producer, who is also called Michael, through working on a film of his as well, I got approached to do it, it sounded like a great film and here we are!

SKSM: How did you get started as a composer and what do you do on production?

Samuel Gr Morgan: I initially started musical life as a singer/songwriter, and still am to a certain extent, when I did my first film it was for Calob and I didn’t really know how to score a film at the time so I was really learning as I went and I learnt a lot about how to communicate ideas with directors and how music is crafted for screen by working with Calob who is sometimes annoyingly particular about what he’s after so it really taught me a lot about how directors see their visions coming together and how I can realise that. Sometimes I just compose lightly straight into my production software along to the film but sometimes for proper meaty pieces of music I’ll score all the music out on sheet music before producing it all.

SKSM: How did you get started to wrote the Soundtrack for All that you love will be carried away?

Samuel Gr Morgan: The whole thing stemmed from three chords, a first inversion C minor, a Gsus and a G major chord, played on strings and literally the whole score grew from there. I also manipulated a sample of a gunshot to fit into the score as a rhythmic beat for certain moments since it’s a part of the story.

SKSM: Is this your most challenging audio so far?

Samuel Gr Morgan: No actually, this kind of melancholic thriller genre is something I’ve always loved from a musical perspective, the sort of long slow melancholic string sounds I’ve always experimented with so i actually felt very comfortable and at home with the shape and direction the score took!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the music that you would like to tell me about?

Samuel Gr Morgan: I found it quite amusing when I sent the first draft of the score off to Michael and I expected lists of notes and amendments and he got back saying “naw that’s great!” albeit over time we made changes here and there but I found it funny that he was so happy with my first shot, since it’s the way by and large that finding the musical aesthetic of a film can be a long process, but I was lucky that I managed to just capture what they were wanting from the off!

SKSM: After All that you love will be carried away did you write more music? If so what?

Samuel Gr Morgan: I’ve adapted bits of the main soundtrack to go into the film’s main trailer actually!

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Samuel Gr Morgan: As I previously said, I compose and produce and perform my own songs, I do so under the name “Kamino Royale” so I’m always working on material for that avenue, I have a few interesting scoring gigs down the line that will be great fun to get into, then i’m also working on arranging an orchestral suite of songs by artists and bands from my home in Northern Ireland, I’m also working on a few productions with a few recording artists including my good friend Lewis Kelly who’s a fantastic young singer songwriter. I’m always busy!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Samuel Gr Morgan: I think Stephen King has been unlucky for film adaptions, even a film like The Shining by the marvellous Stanley Kubrick, which actually features music by one of my favourite composers Krzysztof Penderecki, as brilliant a film it is in its own right, it’s not a great Stephen King adaption, but he’s one of the all time great horror writers and I’ll always relish and lap up the opportunity to lend my musical abilities to bringing those stories to life in whatever capacity on whatever platform.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Samuel Gr Morgan: I absolutely love Take That.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be musicians?

Samuel Gr Morgan: Always put the music first, I know many singers and artists who put the sound or aesthetic or whatever nonsense above the music, but the actual music is the one that takes priority above all, no amount of fancy production or edgy performance can save a weak melody.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Samuel Gr Morgan: You all just lost the game.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Samuel Gr Morgan: You can all go back to your lockdown knitting now.

She played in Jacob Ewing‘s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film as Norma.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Brianna Roy: My name at the time of filming was Brianna Roy, but since then, I got married and my name is now Brianna Temple. I’m an actress and improviser from Arizona. I love acting for commercials, films, and I also enjoy live performances and improv shows. I love writing and filming sketches as well. I’m also a vegan YouTuber-  my channel is Easy Breezy Vegan. My husband and I met in an improv class and we basically do everything together: acting, improv, and YouTube videos. So it’s really nice to be with someone who shares the same interests and passions. Together we take care of my two beautiful and hilarious step kids. Keeping everything together and trying to balance my husband, kids, acting, improv, YouTube, and a household comes with a lot of challenges, but it is so much fun and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Brianna Roy: I knew that I loved performing when I was 7. I wanted to star on MAD TV and also be a pop star just like Britney Spears. In high school I was in Drama and really enjoyed getting to be in plays, but it wasn’t till my early twenties that I decided to actually pursue acting. Before, I thought that I needed to choose a practical career path and had never seriously considered acting, but then I realized that I could fail at the practical thing I decided to do too. So I thought I might as well fail at the thing that I actually wanted to do. Soon after that, I took improv classes and met other actors and dove into the acting world.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby film?

Brianna Roy: I was approached by Jacob (the writer and director of The Man Who Loved Flowers) who had asked if I wanted to be a part of the project after our mutual friend, Avai, referred me to him.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Brianna Roy: I think it’s the ambiguity and open-endedness of the story itself. Does his love exist? Has she ever existed? How long has the man been repeating this cycle? And how often? There are so many questions that the reader is left to answer themselves. It’s this flexibility of the story that allows it to be so interesting for so many different people.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Brianna Roy: The part wasn’t written for me, but I also didn’t have to audition. Mostly because of COVID, Jacob gave me the part based on referrals in lieu of having formal auditions.

SKSM: You worked with Jacob Ewing on this film, how was that?

Brianna Roy: Jacob was awesome to work with! He was really concerned about making sure that everything in the production was professional and he kept everything moving on time. He also was really good at communicating with me. Thanks to Jacob, I knew what was happening in basically every stage of production. Not necessarily all of the nitty gritty details, but I was never left to wonder if and when the film was going to be finished and what the next steps were in the process. Jacob was really nice and his passion about this project was contagious.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Brianna Roy: I think the funniest part about filming was when Luke and I were filming our lovey-dovey flashback scenes. We were both having some trouble trying not to laugh while gazing intently into each other’s eyes after having met only fifteen minutes before.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Brianna Roy: I still talk to Jacob who keeps me updated about what’s happening with the film. My husband and I are also good friends with Austin Buchanan who played the roommate in the film. We usually hang out at least once a week.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Brianna Roy: I’m an improviser and, normally, I perform at three different venues, but since COVID I haven’t done any live performances. Over the past year, I’ve been lucky enough to have several acting gigs come my way through referrals. So I’ve been able to continue acting. Right now, I’m in pre-production for a web series that my friend is working on. Mostly though, I make videos for my YouTube channel, Easy Breezy Vegan.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Brianna Roy: To be honest, I haven’t really read any of Stephen King’s work, but I am a fan of some of his works that have been adapted into movies like The Shawshank Redemption, The Shining, and Carrie.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Brianna Roy: I think people are usually pretty surprised to find out that I’m a vegan YouTuber. I think people are also a little surprised when I tell them that I’m actually pretty shy.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Brianna Roy: Thanks for taking the time to read this and I hope you enjoyed Jacob’s adaptation of The Man Who Loved Flowers! It was a lot of fun to be a part of this!

She played in Michael Lamberti‘s All That You Love Will be Carried Away Dollar Baby film as Lauren Zimmer.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Kali Morgia: My name is Kali Morgia. I’m a senior at Bloomsburg University majoring in theatre arts and Mass communications. I’m the PR and marketing chair for our BU players on campus and have been for two consecutive years. I nominated for an Irene Ryan acting award as well as being the very first person at Bloomsburg University to be nominated for the MTI Vocal Performance award through the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival (KCACTF).

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Kali Morgia: I knew ever since elementary school I would be an actress. I was always a singer, but never dove into acting. Around 5th grade, a friend of mine had told me I should try musicals. The rest is history. I’ve been performing theatre for over a decade and haven’t looked back for a single second.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All that you love will be carried away Dollar Baby film?

Kali Morgia: Michael Lamberti, the director, and I have always been close friends. I did audition for the film, however. It was just Michael in a tiny room filled with computers on campus. I walked in and did a monologue and received the cast email within the next days! Michael has been truly resilient in this process, having dealt with problems with COVID pushing scheduling back, and to see this finally come to fruition makes me incredibly proud of him!

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Kali Morgia: Truthfully and initially, I think people are attracted to Stephen King’s name associated with the film. Thats most likely the initial inciting incident to get them interested. From there, once they actually watch the movie, I think they’ll fall in love with the story and the characters. They’ll see their evolution and learning lessons, going through hardships, and I think the relatability of these characters will latch onto our audience.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Kali Morgia: I auditioned for the part.

SKSM: You worked with Michael Lamberti on this film, how was that?

Kali Morgia: I touched a bit on it earlier, but i’m immensely proud of Michael. He created this incredible movie with only $500 and a couple of friends just getting together to have fun, and that’s what I believe art really is. We have been pretty close for a majority of my college career, and working this closely with him in this production, he’s taught me so much more than i’d ever realize and i’m incredibly thankful for that.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Kali Morgia: I think the funniest moment filming was the scene where I had to kick out James as my husband. Michael gave me the direction to be upset at him, but to take it as extreme as I could. I took a few seconds, found some personal drama to draw inspiration from, and then I flew off the handle, shoving James into the door. After the first take, I had real tears. Michael and other Michael came up to me to check up on me and then immediately started freaking out about how incredible the take had been. To this day, It’s probably the most memorable moment in my entire theatre career.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Kali Morgia: Most of us communicate frequently!  Most of us are in the same major, so we see each other at least everyday. Some of the crew i never got into contact with again, which was sad because we had bonded. But the actors, we have been in multiple productions together.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Kali Morgia: I’m currently assistant directing my first production, our mainstage show at Bloomsburg, which is “Much Ado about Murder” by Pat Cook. I also recently wrote my first play “Gummy Bear Shots” and it was produced by the university in our last semester mainstage titled “The Screen Plays” which focused on producing student written plays.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Kali Morgia: I’m a huge Stephen King fan! I think that might be part of the reason Mike picked me to be in this movie. I’m a huge fan of all things macabre. Tim burton, Stephen king, criminal minds, serial killer documentaries, you name it!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Kali Morgia: I was the first person from Bloomsburg University to be nominated for the vocal performance award. Not many people know that I can sing on first look!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Kali Morgia: I hope you enjoy the film! I hope you see how much fun we had on it!

He played in Jacob Ewing‘s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film as The Man.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Luke Heinemann: My name is Luke Heinemann, and I am a relatively new actor trying to find his way around this crazy industry I fell in love with. I was born and raised in Tucson, Arizona to a family of educators. I’ve always been a shy person who never wanted to stand out, but the older I got a shift happened in my personality. I discovered a craving to be something I wasn’t. An entertainer. I started out working as a technician at a Wild West Stunt Show, while taking some acting classes at the local community college. After a year of being a technician I was fortunate enough to join the cast. For a few months I worked with some amazing people that taught me a lot about the art of performance with some really fun stunts. When the pandemic hit I left the show to find other work and eventually found myself getting into film opposed to live performance.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Luke Heinemann: I remember one of the last weeks of high school I went out to dinner with my parents and I told them of this wild dream I had developed. I said “I want to try and be an actor.” Coming from an introverted, socially anxious kid, my parents were rightfully so doubtful about my new found interest. I had previously never expressed any intent in getting up in front of a camera, or much less getting in front of a group of people. And for a year afterwards they were right. I had gone to college to pursue a career in business and technology, completely leaving behind that dream I had once talked about. Although after one year in college I knew something had to change; so I came back home to find a different direction in life. This propelled me to finally try the one thing that scared me the most. Actually going for a dream I had. That year I came back I decided to take a couple acting classes at Pima Community College. After a wonderful experience that’s when I confidently knew I wanted to be an actor.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby film?

Luke Heinemann: Jacob Ewing was a friend I was fortunate enough to meet through my brother-in-law. He knew I was someone interested in the acting world as we had talked about it in the past. One day he reached out to me to audition for the lead in this mysterious short film. I remember being perplexed about the idea of being his main character because the only experience I had was some stage and stunt work. But in the end, I extremely grateful for the opportunity he gave me for the acting and filmmaking experience.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Luke Heinemann: The man in the story is a blank slate. A nobody who is apparently madly in love. I think a lot of people in the beginning of the story can find a way to relate to this character. When there’s a someone with such a mysterious backstory, the viewer can fill the gaps themselves, allowing for a more personal connection. That’s what makes the twist so great. You’re pulled into this seemingly normal, nice guy who completely betrays the trust you put into him. From a story standpoint, I think it’s fun whenever it turns out everything is not as it seems.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Luke Heinemann: I did have to audition. Jacob told me he was specifically eyeing me for the role from the beginning but, naturally, he wanted to make sure I would fit the roll.

SKSM: You worked with Jacob Ewing on this film, how was that?

Luke Heinemann: Working with Jacob was a wonderful first experience being on a film set. Already knowing him obviously relieved most of the pressure for my first time being in a movie, so overall it was just a great time. Not to say I wasn’t nervous… because I still most definitely was.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Luke Heinemann: To me, every scene we shot was in its own right a special moment. From seeing how the camera work was done to the sound design, and how intricately everything was crafted.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Luke Heinemann: At the moment I’ve only really been in contact with Jacob. Life has been busy with work and other personal projects. With such a short period of time we spent shooting, along with our covid precautions, there wasn’t a lot of downtime to connect with the other cast and crew members. Although I’m so glad I got to work with the other amazing actors and crew members who worked so hard on this film. Everyone was extremely talented and professional, and I hope I get the chance to work with them again in the future.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Luke Heinemann: As of now I have been trying my hand at my own filmmaking, and getting involved with other smaller projects to get as much experience in all avenues of the world of filming as I can.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Luke Heinemann: I am a fan of Stephen King. I’ve never been a consistent reader but the few books I have read of his, we’re very enjoyable reads. Notably the classics like “The Green Mile” and his short story collection “Night Shift.” Next on my list is most definitely “The Shining.” Don’t tell anyone, but I still haven’t even seen the movie.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Luke Heinemann: I’m not too sure it’s necessarily surprising as I briefly talked about this already relating to my anxiety; but as an actor I do suffer a lot from stage fright. I think a lot of actors struggle with that to some extent. It’s one of those things where you have to find the right footing and allow yourself to fall into the character. But that’s the part that makes it so worth it. Being able to create this other person who is an extension of yourself, and hopefully being able to provided an entertaining experience for the viewer. It’s all an addicting process.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Luke Heinemann: I just would like to thank everyone who watched our film. I’m excited to see where things go from here, especially when this pandemic subsides.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Luke Heinemann: Nothing else to add, although I would like to say to anyone reading this who is doubtful of their life direction or passions to follow, to find the courage to jump into something. Taste as much as you can in life, because you never know, the one thing you might’ve been avoiding could be that passion you desire. Also I am still young and naive, with a long way to go with this career, so take my advice with as much salt as you want.

He is the Producer of Michael Lamberti‘s All That You Love Will be Carried Away Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers?

Michael Innamorato: My name is Michael Innamorato, I recently graduated from Bloomsburg University  and I love making movies – writing, editing, acting, you name it.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a producer?

Michael Innamorato: I don’t think there’s a specific moment in life that I could pinpoint that, it just kind of came about as I started becoming passionate for film!

SKSM: How did you become involved in All that you love will be carried away Dollar Baby film?

Michael Innamorato: Michael Lamberti, the director, is one of my best Friends and he wanted my help on the film.

SKSM: Can you tell us about your work in the film?

Michael Innamorato: I helped oversee the script, I was the behind-the-scenes camera operator, and I edited the film in its entirety.

SKSM: What was it like to work with Michael Lamberti on this film?

Michael Innamorato: It was a dream – this was his first big project and his planning for it was immaculate, outside of the obvious global pandemic that occurred.

SKSM: Was there any funny things that happened while filming (Bloopers, etc)

Michael Innamorato: Our main actor, Jim Kelley, has a luscious mane resembling Tommy Wiseau’s, and we were constantly quoting his films on set.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Michael Innamorato: I am! I haven’t read a great many, but I’d like to read the anthology that ‘All That You Love’ came from.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Michael Innamorato: Mostly my own projects which I’m not able to speak on at this time, sorry!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Something you’d like to tell our readers?

Michael Innamorato: Keep working your hardest and doing your best!

He is the filmmaker of The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jacob Ewing: My name is Jacob Ewing, and I am a writer/director based in Tucson, Arizona. I’m a total film/pop culture obsessive and consume as much media as I reasonably can. The majority of my hobbies involve some sort of art/entertainment consumption.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Jacob Ewing: When I was very young, I finally put together that all of the movies I watched were created by someone. They didn’t magically appear out of thin air. Truly, it was Jurassic Park that ignited my passion for film and filmmaking. I would watch it on repeat (and still do!) and would find myself asking “how did they do that?” From then on, I was equally obsessed with the making-of aspect of a movie’s release as I was the actual movie itself. Honestly, I don’t believe there has been one moment in my life that I can truly remember where I did not want to be a filmmaker. It’s in my DNA.

SKSM: When did you make The Man Who Loved Flowers? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Jacob Ewing: We filmed The Man Who Loved Flowers over two separate days at the beginning of November, 2020. I had previously been attached to work on another Dollar Baby that was being developed by a different filmmaker. That project fell apart, but I really felt that I could use the momentum of that production to get my own Dollar Baby started. So, I went onto the Stephen King website and submitted myself to adapt the story. As soon as I was approved, I wrote the screenplay and assembled a cast/crew of some of the best, most dedicated artists I know in Tucson. We didn’t have a budget, but I knew that every single person on that set would give 110% to the film as well as adhere to my (very strict) COVID-19 safety protocols. The two days we shot were quick and efficient, with the actual editing of the short being the lengthiest part of the process. After multiple friends/family screenings, I was finally able to find the rhythm to the story and edit it in a way that, I believe, is really satisfying.

SKSM: How come you picked The Man Who Loved Flowers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Jacob Ewing: When I was selecting a story to adapt, I was very conscious of the fact that I would be adapting a *Stephen King* short. Already, that is just a dream come true for me as a lifelong King fanatic. So, I asked myself, “if this is the only opportunity I will ever have to adapt King’s work, what do I want to get out of it?” The answer was that I wanted to know I worked on a *scary* Stephen King story. Something that felt like classic King. Of the available stories, The man who loved flowers really stuck out to me in how it told such a delightfully macabre story in such a short span of time. It was quick and efficient, which appealed to me. The genius of King’s writing here is how, for the majority of the short story, it reads like a bright and fun romance with really nice, witty dialogue. We know we’re reading Stephen King, so that vibrant atmosphere actually brings tension as we wait for something bad to happen. I just think that being able to use the tropes of a romantic comedy to build suspense and fear is incredible. That was a unique challenge to me, to see if I could make something that felt like an indie romance film for the majority and then use those genre expectations to have it become terrifying by the end.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Jacob Ewing: I am a big Stephen King fan, so I was generally aware of the Dollar Baby program and the concept of it. But I didn’t really know the fine details of developing a Dollar Baby, so that was definitely a learning experience.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jacob Ewing: Yeah, at one point we were filming outside the front door of an apartment for a sequence towards the end of the film. As we’re shooting, some random guy walked by, saw us filming, and then proceeded to film us on his phone while we were filming. It wasn’t a big deal at first, people are always interested when they see cameras and whatnot. But this guy would comment and talk while he was filming and so it started ruining takes because we could hear him in the background. Additionally, he was making us all really uncomfortable (seeing as a strange man was filming us without permission for who knows what). So, as the director, I had to take on the responsibility of getting him to leave. The dude was super weird and, even though I tried to explain the situation and be really nice, he refused to leave. So, now I’m getting angry that this random person is ruining our shoot and I started yelling at him. For a second, I thought there was going to be a fight because I had fully lost my patience and things were getting really heated. Finally, the guy stormed off, upset that I was being “so mean”, and we finished shooting. He had been recording the whole thing so, somewhere, I’d like to believe there is this hilarious footage of me cursing out some random jerk for messing with my Stephen King movie.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe an internet/DVD release would be possible?

Jacob Ewing: It doesn’t bother me too much, I would say. Of course I want everyone to be able to see it, especially fellow Stephen King fans, but I understand the reasoning. At the end of the day, King’s rules for the Dollar Baby make sense in that he is, essentially, letting inexperienced filmmakers use his name as a means to potentially get a foot in the door of the industry. These films aren’t meant to “go viral”, they’re meant to help aspiring artists. I think that is really, really cool of King to do given that there is no incentive for him to do so outside of the kindness of his own heart. So, yes, while I would absolutely love to have this widely released in some way, shape, or form so that more people could see it, I can’t complain at all. I got to make a Stephen King movie; I’ll do whatever he tells me to do!

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Jacob Ewing: Thankfully, we haven’t received any bad reviews or feedback thus far. Now that it’s finished, the response has truly been amazing. I am so gratified to have people reach out and say how impressed they were with the work. It’s incredibly rewarding, as a filmmaker, to have kind things said about your work. There have been some fans who excitedly reached out to see if they caught all of the Stephen King easter eggs hidden throughout the film (there are a lot to find). My favorite reactions have been from those who are enjoying the romance/sweetness of the story up until the very end when their eyes suddenly widen, and the screams start coming. I truly have so much pride for my entire cast/crew and what we accomplished together. I couldn’t have done any of this without them.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Jacob Ewing: We just played at the Apex Film & Music Video Festival and have submitted to multiple others. Hoping that we are accepted to as many as we enter!

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Jacob Ewing: I am a massive fan of Stephen King. He is, for my money, the great American author of our time and one of the most important voices in horror that has ever existed. Can you imagine a world without Stephen King and his works? I can’t. He is an incredible writer and has truly been one of my great inspirations throughout my life. In terms of favorite works, I am a diehard fan of Pet Sematary. I think that is the most terrifying novel I have ever read, yet it still manages to be incredibly moving and emotional. As an aspiring writer, I cannot recommend On Writting enough, either. Just filled with amazing stories and wisdom that makes it a must-read for any creative. Regarding adaptations of these stories, there are so many iconic and great movies/series, but I would say my absolute favorites are The Mist, The Green Mile, Carrie, 1408, It (both the miniseries and chapter one movie), Gerald’s Game, and Doctor Sleep.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Jacob Ewing: I have not had any personal contact at this time. The blu-ray/DVD I made is finally getting sent out for him to watch and add to the collection. I know that every once in a while he will reach out to the filmmakers if he is impressed by the short. My greatest hope with this entire Dollar Baby process is that Stephen King likes it enough to let me know he enjoyed it. That’s all I could ever ask for, so fingers crossed!

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Jacob Ewing: I don’t think I’ll do another Dollar Baby, but I would never say never! If I could ever do a Stephen King adaptation outside of this program that would be a total dream. I have two picks for story I would want to tackle. The first is, no surprise here, Pet Sematary. I know that the first is considered somewhat of a classic, but I think a modern adaptation, either film or limited series, could be incredible in ways that the latest version missed the mark on. My second pick would be Graveyard Shift, because I think there’s a lot of room to expand that story for a modern audience and have some terrifying fun with all of the monster/creature effects.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jacob Ewing: I am constantly writing and challenging myself as a filmmaker. The next project I have written and will, hopefully, shoot soon is a horror short film (go figure). I see this as the end of an unofficial, unconnected horror trilogy that I’ve done. I started with a short film called Nightmare (you can find under my channel “Jacob Ewing Presents!” on YouTube) that is a ghost story. Then, of course, I just did The Man Who Loved Flowers which is a *SPOILERS* sort of serial killer story. This next project would let me do a monster story, which is one of my favorite horror subgenres and one I am hugely excited to try.

SKSM: What’s one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jacob Ewing: That I’m in their house watching them right now. Don’t turn around. Keep reading.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jacob Ewing: Thank you for taking the time to read my rambling responses! I attempted to be as thorough and fun as I could be, so I hope that anyone who reads this enjoyed doing so. I am proud to be a member of this fan community and would encourage everyone out there to do the thing that makes you happy. Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t or get in your own head before you even begin. Just get out there and do what you’re passionate about!

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Jacob Ewing: Yeah, if anyone wants to check out my other works or see the first two minutes of this adaptation please check out and subscribe to my YouTube channel: Jacob Ewing Presents! This is also my Instagram username, so feel free to follow me there as well.

Thanks for having me!

 

He is the filmmaker of All That You Love Will be Carried Away Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Michael Lamberti: Hello, my name is Michael Lamberti, I am a full sail university student studying film production. I am also a recent graduate from Bloomsburg University with a bachelor of liberal arts. I am an actor, costume designer, filmmaker and videographer.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Michael Lamberti: Ever sense I was born! My mom introduced me to Star Wars, Jurrassic Park, Terminator and Alien. Ever sense then I always wanted to make films and make it my career.

SKSM: When did you make All That You Love Will be Carried Away? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Michael Lamberti: It was scary at first. Because I got the rights around August of 2019 and we were supposed to film in March of 2020. But right around we were supposed to film for this short, COVID – 19 happened and everyone was stuck at home. So if COVID never happened I would say it took five months to work on this. But sense COVID is still a thing it took us a year to get this film finished.

SKSM: How come you picked All that you love will be carried away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Michael Lamberti: I actually looked at the logline of the stories before I decided to work on this one. It fascinated me so much and I always wanted to make films not only a enjoyable experience but also an educational experience. For myself and other about certain subjects. Mental health and Mental Illness is such a very sensitive subject to talk about. I want to have the conversation about mental health so everyone doesn’t rely on stigmas anymore. The more educated we are the better.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Michael Lamberti: OKAY! SO! I was interning for Sky Media in London in the Summer of 2019. I did research for a video called 101 facts about Stephen King by 101 facts. Then I stumbled onto a fact I wasn’t expecting and it was the dollar baby film festival. I was blown away and didn’t think it was real. So I did a fact check and sure enough it was real.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Michael Lamberti: Jim Kelly who plays Alfie Zimmer. His hair is so long everyone thought I got Tommy Wiseau to do the movie. There were so many jokes on set and online. It was beautiful. We also making a behind the scene documentary on everyone’s experience on the film.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe an internet/dvd release would be possible?

Michael Lamberti: The film will be released in March 6th, 2021 6:30pm under by Lamberti Media on Youtube.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Michael Lamberti: So far I have gotten good feedback on this film. But we shall see when the film is released!

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Michael Lamberti: I do plan on submitting this to numerous film festivals that are aren’t nonprofit or a third party. I gotta do some research first! But yes do expect to see this film at more film festivals.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Michael Lamberti: YEP! My mom got me into Mr. King’s work. The first film I watched Christine, then it was Storm of the Century, later on was The Shining. My all time favourite is The Mist. Especially the ending of that film completely blew me away.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Michael Lamberti: I haven’t yet, only his assistant who has be incredible during the pandemic. I would love to talk to him about All That You Love Will Be Carried Away.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Michael Lamberti: I do want to make another one! This film was a lot of fun to work on and it inspired me to keep making films!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Michael Lamberti: I am currently working on two original screen plays that I want to produce! One of called The Night Shift a horror thriller and the second one is called Bloody Therapy a Horror Comedy.

I will be acting in a short film by NightlyBoi Cinema titled Reevena’s Revenge.

Including working on numerous short films with the film department at Full Sail University!

Also I want to start applying to acting agencies sense I have been doing acting for twelve years and have a reel ready to go. I might as well start applying!

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Michael Lamberti: I actually have a learning disability and aspergers. This film has challenged me so much because communication and social skills is a must in this industry. Doing this film made me so proud that I was able to grow and adapt to any situation that was thrown at me. Because throughout my college education I usually got you can’t do this you’re not good enough! Or you lack the education to pull this project off. But I am happy to say if you are willing to do the work you can prove a lot of people wrong!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Michael Lamberti: No Problem! If I have to say anything I would mention that this overall process was very risky. We filmed this during the pandemic. I was ready to stop production for the safety of others but I asked everyone if they still wanted to do this. Everyone said yeah let’s do it. So without the cast and crew this film wouldn’t exist today without their help. To my cast and crew thank you so much! You guys are amazing.

Also to the people that watched the film, I do want to mention you will fail a lot but you will learn a lot as you continue on this journey. No one is a perfectionist on their first try! Make movies, skits, volunteer to help your friends with projects, challenge yourself! You will be shocked where it can take you when you take first step.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Michael Lamberti: If you want to follow me and my artistic journey. Please consider following my Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube Channel for more content. I do have a podcast called the Mike’s One Mics Podcast. We talk about tv, movie, video games and theater! So, if that interests you please consider following us!

He played in Taylor Doose‘s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film as The Man.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Robert Milo Andrus: My name is Robert Andrus. Ever since I can remember, I have been drawn to television and film. I have been in the film industry for over 20 years now and can tell you that I love what I do. I am an actor, acting coach, associate casting director and producer.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Robert Milo Andrus: I did a community play with my family, “Annie Get Your Gun”. The thrill of entrances and exits, all the attention pre- and post- show. It was exciting and engaging and amazing. Once, I heard the applause, I was hooked.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby film?

Robert Milo Andrus: I heard about the audition through our acting community and auditioned for the role. I had worked with the producer prior to auditioning, so thought it would be fun.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Robert Milo Andrus: Stephen King is a legend, so that was attractive to me. Also, the title is intriguing. The story, I think the story has a way to connect the audience to the Man and his journey.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Robert Milo Andrus: I auditioned for the role with a monologue that I’ve had (in the back of my mind) for over 20 years. It is one of my first acing monologues. It is a fun one to dust off when given the opportunity.

SKSM: You worked with Taylor Doose on this film, how was that?

Robert Milo Andrus: It was a great experience to work with Taylor Doose. I lovingly refer to him as Doose. He is a great guy and we’ve since worked on several projects. I’ll work with him anytime!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Robert Milo Andrus: One of the scenes was filmed in and near the parking lot of my first Junior High School. I found that to be disturbing… and nostalgic.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Robert Milo Andrus: I do. I even officiated a wedding that brought several of the cast and crew back together.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Robert Milo Andrus: I have a alien-western project on the horizon and have a comedy-western due out soon. Lots of irons in the fire – so to speak. I am also

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Robert Milo Andrus: Yes! Carrie! The Stand! Misery! The Shining! The Green Mile! Firestarter! Yes!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Robert Milo Andrus: I’ve grown out my hair 3 times and donated it to charity 2 times.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Robert Milo Andrus: Thank you!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Robert Milo Andrus: Stay safe and be well!!!

He is the filmmaker of That Feeling Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Paul Inman: Well, before I do let me take this moment to say thank you for giving me, and the rest of us, this opportunity to have our voices heard and thank you for helping nurture and build a supportive community around these Dollar Baby films. I’d be remiss if I didn’t show my gratitude. So, thank you!

My name is Paul Inman. I’m married to my best friend, Kim, and we have one child who amazes me everyday. We also have a dog who is very spoiled – as she should be.

I’m a music teacher by trade. Music is my first love and it was through music I learned how to be a storyteller. I’m not sure that I would go as far as to call myself a filmmaker before I would call myself a storyteller. And I don’t know if I would be so bold to say I was a writer either – even though I do plenty of that (I have also written and published a full-length novel titled Ageless – shameless self-promotion to be sure). It all falls back to the magic of telling a good story.

I’ve done my share of creative things over the years, and I imagine that I’ll continue. My hope is that I move people in some way.

SKSM: How would you decide that shooting movies was your mission?

Paul Inman: When I was in college my friends and I bought a used video camera from a pawn shop. We also bought a VHS tape (yes, I’m old – or at least I feel that way sometimes) so we could document our “adventures.” With that VHS tape and video camera, we made our first film. It was a terrible parody of The Blair Witch Project. We had no plot or plan, there was no character development, or anything resembling an actual film, but it was the spark that lit the fire inside of me. There was a passion that couldn’t be matched with music alone. But I learned that no matter what I did, whether it was making a podcast, or writing a song, or making a goofy b-movie with my friends, I’d found what I needed to do with my life; create.

So, I have.

Music, movies, books, scripts, podcasts, and whatever interests me.

SKSM: In addition to filmmaker you wear a lot of hats in this Dollar Baby film. Could you tell more about it?

Paul Inman: We’ve chosen to adapt the short “That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is In French” – first collected in Everything’s Eventual – into a short film that we’re calling That Feeling. In the production of That Feeling I’ve taken on many roles as is customary in independent filmmaking. Some by choice and some by necessity. We live in a time in which more content is put out every day than one could watch in their entire lifetime. And almost everyone has to be able to do everything.

I knew when this first came to be that I was going to be the producer, writer, director, and editor. It’s wonderful to have so much control over what the final product can be. It’s also exhausting. Producing something of this size is a completely different beast than a 5-10 minute short film.

I was lucky enough to surround myself with some amazing people. I had a great 1st AD, Marshall Wells, who kept us moving forward. We also had some very talented – and dedicated – cast and crew that kept me motivated through this whole journey. I knew that the harder I pushed myself the better this film will be and the prouder those people can be of their excellent work.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of That Feeling or some updates?

Paul Inman: That Feeling wrapped principle photography in early January, 2021 and is currently in post-production. I’m working to lock the edit before I dive into the VFX, and sound, and pass it along to our amazing composer Gary Thomas. The movie isn’t a movie to me until it has a soundtrack and Gary is one of the best out there.

SKSM: Who would be involved in this project?

Paul Inman: We had two wonderful leads in Cait Salvino and Ian Blanco. The supporting actors were outstanding as well! I think there were a total of 13 speaking roles and another 4 or 5 non-speaking as well as round 40-50 extras. Everyone was amazing and gave their all in every take.

We were extremely fortunate to work with a great crew made of a terrific group of college-aged filmmakers along with some filmmaking friends of mine!

SKSM: Why did you pick “That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is In French” to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Paul Inman: The main character, Carol, is an interestingly flawed character. We learn so much about her life in those 12 or so pages; from the bond that she has with her family, to the cold, collapsing marriage, seemingly hanging on by a thread of what was once love, to the oppressive hold that religion can have over certain people – it really is a masterclass of turning a little into a lot.

Also, for whatever reason, I’m drawn to stories that are non-linear like this one. I could be in the minority when it comes to that, LOL. I feel like there are so many ways that this story could unfold and still keep the powerful meaning behind it. The idea that deja vu could be more is always an intriguing trope. It doesn’t hurt that there are subtle parallels to The Dark Tower series, either.

SKSM: King uses a lot of internalization and a lot of flashbacks in the story. In my opinión, it’s not easy to adapt this story. What are the biggest problems you had while filming?

Paul Inman: You are right. There are a lot of difficulties when adapting this story. For example, the majority of the original short story is presented as the inner thoughts of the main character. Inner thoughts can be difficult in a visual medium like filmmaking. Sure, we can do voiceovers to represent those inner thoughts, but, especially visually, this isn’t always the most effective way to create an engaging film.

My friend, Ben Higgins, helped shape the story that became the adaptation. He was a great sounding board for my ideas to adapt this story into a short film. Without giving too much away, I think that we found a way to balance the visually interesting while staying true to the spirit of the inner dialogue. I’m happy to share that the adaptation has kept a lot of the source material that was originally written by Stephen King. We expanded on some of the ideas as well, this is an adaptation after all.

As for the filming… I think that nailing down an airplane was one of the most difficult tasks. We had less than 7 days before rolling the camera and the plane wasn’t locked. That was a little bit nerve-wracking, to say the least.  In the end, where there’s a plane, there’s a plan.

SKSM: When the film is done, where would you like the premiere of your Dollar Baby film to be?

Paul Inman: Great question! In these strange Covid times normal premiers are basically out the window.

I’d love to premiere That Feeling in the first ever online Stephen King Dollar Baby Film Festival that’s being put together in April, 2021. It would be amazing to have a worldwide debut online where everyone can view it at least once. I’m not sure that I can get the post-production finished in time, however. But I’m willing to try!

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Paul Inman: I love Stephen King! Five feet to my left, is a book shelf that holds more than 50 first edition novels dating all the way back to the early 1980s. Of course, I have all of the earlier books too, only those aren’t first editions. They are a little too costly right now! LOL.

The Dark Tower series stands out as some of my favorite books. I also really enjoyed the Institute (one of his newer books). The Talisman (with Peter Straub) is an excellent book as well. You can really see how the “other worlds” developed for The Dark Tower series in that book. I like all the most popular ones too.

As for adaptations, I really like the excellent character work in Stand By Me based on “The Body,” Shawshank Redemption is amazing, The Green Mile is equally as amazing (might even be better) and I enjoyed The Mist a lot as well.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Paul Inman: Wow, at this point I can’t remember. I imagine I found it online several years ago. I feel like it was through the official website… maybe.

What I do remember is that when I found out about it I was instantly enamoured with the idea of being able to create a Stephen King film. I never pursued it until recently because I was always afraid I would fail. I still have a little bit of that healthy fear in the back of my mind. Even if this film is considered a failure in the eyes of the viewers, I know that I’ve succeeded beyond my wildest imagination just by making it this far.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Paul Inman: Funny question! I guess people would be surprised to know that I am a classically trained vocalist and I was in a rap group that recorded a few independent albums in the early 2000s. How’s that for juxtaposition???

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Paul Inman: My advice is to learn as much as you can about the art of filmmaking. We live in a time where everything you’ve ever wanted to know is at your fingertips. Take the time to study it and learn how to do the things that you love. There’s nothing wrong with picking up a camera and filming things, it’s a great way to open the door. To be the best you can be, you need to learn the right way and the wrong way to do it. That way each decision you make is calculated and educated when it comes to your films.

Learn about people and what makes us perfectly flawed humans, because the flashiest visuals won’t matter if no one cares about the people on the screen.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Paul Inman: This is an amazing community and I’m proud to be part of it. Thank you for giving me a little bit of your precious time. And thank you for inviting me to do this interview. Grateful doesn’t even begin to describe how I feel.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else to this interview?

Paul Inman: Again, thanks so much for this opportunity!

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