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He is the filmmaker of Rest Stop Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Joshua Lozano: My name is Joshua Gasca Lozano, a 21 year old man in El Paso, Texas.  I love writing, films, and YouTube video editing and creation. Any sort of writing, I try to do it. Especially films and comics!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Joshua Lozano: I remember it vividly: I had always wanted to be involved in filmmaking, but at a young age, it was as an actor. Seeing Mark Hamill, Jim Carrey, and Jackie Chan just gave me this passion of wanting to be in the movies. Then one day when I was 12, I was sick as a dog, and my folks gave me some VHS tapes to watch while I stayed in bed.  A lot of them were movies I had already watched but hadn’t seen in years (I.E: Shanghai Noon, Toy Story, The Mask), but there was one movie that they let me watch that I was always curious about. It was Pulp Fiction. After the credits rolled and seeing that one man wrote and directed the whole thing — it was mindblowing! One man basically came up with this whole scenario, all these characters? It was absolutely game-changing for me, and I had already had good feedback on my writing up until that point through school. So I started writing screenplays and learning as much as I could about filmmaking, and… here we are!

SKSM: When did you make Rest Stop? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Joshua Lozano: Oh man, how much time do you got? Basically, what happened was I was involved with a local production company in town. I had made a film with them, but I lamented the fact that there were so many issues all throughout production for it that I started to worry about my future. While I was still there, I found out about the Dollar Babies, and when I got the rights, I bought Just After Sunset and learned the story from beginning to end, even going so far as to write it down in a separate text document to send it to my crew.  I got the rights back in October of 2018, and things just took off from there.

It was an absolute nightmare, from start to finish. When I started pre-production, I left the production company, but then my mom dislocated her ankle. I ended up taking two jobs while I was trying (and failing) to get pre-production finished so we could start filming. Then I had to quit them because it was overwhelming, and the other job almost got me killed. I ended up working at a movie theater where I met my composer Annessa Hernandez, which had so many perks, but it barely paid anything. Meanwhile, the actor we originally got for the main role, he did not have a good schedule for what we were aiming for. Up until the 11th hour, we were recasting and casting random roles, and still hadn’t secured locations. Then on August 4th, I was kicked out by my parents, and had to end up staying with my girlfriend and her dad. So while I was set to start shooting a mere five or so days after the fact, I was also looking for a fulltime job.

We started filming in August, and didn’t finish filming until October. My director of photography, Luis Moreno Ramirez, and my producer, Adam Lopez, were such troopers for holding up fort the way they did. There were certainly points where we came to blows, mostly because with my situation, I felt disconnected from the whole project and just had to sink or swim. But with Adam putting up over $3,000 for this film, it felt like I needed to power through — someone wouldn’t invest this much into an idea I had unless they believed in me, right?

It was a race against time, because I found out Rest Stop was purchased by Alex Perry Ross to be turned into a feature, and that meant there would be no extensions for production.  In addition to that, on September, our actor had school and a job, so shooting slowed to a crawl! I was freaking out every second, and the lowest point was shooting a scene at a bar, and we had to deal with a heckling bar patron who was harassing our actress. It felt like every victory was cut-short, and we had very little time.

Pre, pro, and post production done in ONE year.  Comparatively, it was more like 8 months. It was absolutely laborious, but we finally got it done… by some miracle, we were able to get it done!

SKSM: How come you picked Rest Stop to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Joshua Lozano: You know… it’s interesting, when I looked at the whole list of available stories to adapt, I had to tell myself to hold off and look at the stories carefully. That said, when I saw Rest Stop’s title, it already intrigued me — it was as if the title was calling to me, and very vivid images started entering my mind. Then I looked into what the story was, and I was completely in love with the storytelling potential. I didn’t see a horror movie, but the idea of a character — an author, even — being torn apart and losing every sense of his identity until he just kinda falls into his pseudonym through dark, violent thoughts, it showed me that there’s a real character study here that was just so damn fun and interesting to get into! As a writer myself, it made me excited to work on a story that shows how emotional this can be. You know, there’s so many discussions about method actors and how they carry their characters with them, but writers carry the entire story with them, the tone and the dialogue and characters, and it can really mentally get to you. I wanted to explore that through this.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Joshua Lozano: Funnily enough, I found out about it from my Grandma. Before things went south, she always sent me articles to help me out with my filmmaking. A few years ago, she sent me an article about King, and I just kinda forgot about it until I thought about it and realized “Well… this really could help me out! This could be a lot of fun!”

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Joshua Lozano: There was actually one really special moment that I had on set with the crew and the actors. It was the second to last day in August we were shooting, and we were shooting the climactic scene in the rest stop bathroom. This was the biggest thing in the whole film — it was basically the whole of the story written by King! We went to a park bathroom nearby my parent’s house, and my producer Adam Lopez got up and removed the fluorescent lights so that we could light the set as dingy as I wanted it to. We shot from 9 PM, I believe, all the way until 1PM, and we managed to get every single set-up I wanted in that area. Everyone went home except for me, my cinematographer Luis, my make-up artists Adilene Villarreal, and one of the actors there, Paola Dubrule. Rather than go home, we were all still really jazzed up and decided to go to Ihop and get some food in our system. We stayed in that restaurant for… god — it must’ve been hours? We stayed there until the clouds started to brighten, and either Luis or Paola must’ve had the bright idea to go somewhere to watch the sunrise.  So we got in my truck I was borrowing, courtesy of my father-in-law, and we drove out nearby Luis’ house to a construction site, and parked by an empty lot as the sun blossomed out from the horizon. Then, Luis — he must’ve been completely hyper because of the lack of sleep — started really getting excited about getting doughnuts. So we started driving to Krispy Kreme, all the while blasting on “Young, Dumb and Broke” by Khalid.

We felt invincible… it was a huge challenge pulling everything off, and we all were able to do it. We were a family. Are a family.

We still talk about how – after the COVID-19 pandemic eases up – we should meet up and do it all again, another all night adventure/celebration.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Joshua Lozano: It feels more upsetting, because we poured a lot of blood, sweat, and tears into it, and it’s something we are unbelievably proud of. When you struggle so much on a project, the ability to see how others react to it is what makes it worthwhile.

I hope against hope that we are able to show it to more people, hopefully with an internet release, given the state of the world. I’ve been trying to see what can be done.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Joshua Lozano: Everyone has been overwhelmingly positive with the film! We were hoping to make something in El Paso that didn’t feel like it was good for an El Paso film, but good as a film in general. The cinematography by Luis was widely praised, the music by my fantastic composer Annessa was praised all around, the acting has been a highlight for my lead star Brad Lee Thomason, who is just a dynamite talent. Even the pacing was something I was worried about, but people have enjoyed how it passes by, but feels as slow enough to rest with everyone.

If there’s one thing that people have complained about, it’s the spotty sound, which we could only do so much with given our short time to get it done. Though I wish that we could’ve done it proper, like given a second chance to do some parts right.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Joshua Lozano: Actually, we are! It’s won a few awards at a couple of festivals (Los Angeles Motion Picture Festival, Pinnacle Awards), and I submitted it to the Mindfield Film Festival in Alberquerque, New Mexico, the New Orleans Film Festival, Austin Film Festival, Cannes Short Film Festival, Atlanta Film Festival, Torino Underground Film Fest, Raindance Film Festival, and once I get a little extra money, I even plan on submitting it to Sundance.

In addition to this, I also plan on submitting it to the El Paso Plaza Classic Film Festival, with the hope that the city will be open by then to have it screen in my hometown. It would be so rewarding to be able to have this film premiere here.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Joshua Lozano: Oh I absolutely love him! Oddly enough, I love his more experimental, non-horror stories like The Green Mile and Shawshank Redemption (which are also my favorite adaptations, to the point where Frank Darabont’s approach to his adaptations drove me through my approach to touching the King of Horror’s work). If there’s one I absolutely love though, it’s his Hard Crime stories like The Colorado Kid and Joyland, which just scratch that pulpy itch that I have.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Joshua Lozano: I never got to talk to him personally, but his assistant Margaret was really courteous to me and my questions! He hasn’t seen it yet, but I would LOVE to see what he thinks of it. I remember seeing what he said about most Dollar Babies, and it’s a challenge to see if he’ll love my stab at his work or not. If he likes it, it would be the best praise I could ever get. If he doesn’t, I’ll know I need to work harder!

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Joshua Lozano: Man… after the stress of this film, I don’t want to think of adapting another short story with the resources I’ve got. However, if I were given the opportunity to adapt some of his stories to the big screen… The Colorado Kid and Joyland would be dreams, just because I would love to approach those as neo-noir films — those are my bread and butter.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Joshua Lozano: Right now, I’m focusing on three things: writing screenplays for myself and local studios in town that I want to work with, working on my YouTube channel called joshboy64 that is primarily a video essay/film criticism channel, and co-hosting a series of podcasts on a website that I am a part of with a close friend of mine called “Renegade Pop Culture.”

I want to do a new short film soon, completely different from Rest Stop, that is a romance. However, things are a bit topsy turvy right now… Hopefully, we can do it soon!

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Joshua Lozano: I used to want to be a musician! I tried to learn the guitar thanks to my grandfather, but I just didn’t have the discipline. My dream instrument I’d love to learn is the piano.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Joshua Lozano: Even in the face of absolute uncertainty, if you keep pushing through, with the right support at your side, you can achieve your wildest dreams. It seems easy to give up when things go wrong, but when it all comes together, it’s beautiful.  When the film finally came together and I saw the final cut, I was in tears.

If there’s any artists out there… just create, make it happen. Trust me, you will be rewarded just by it existing. It can only be done by you.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Joshua Lozano: Any agents out there… my lines are open. Warner Bros., just letting you know, I’d make a killer Blue Beetle film!

He is the filmmaker of Rest Stop Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Tyson Jarvis: My name is Tyson Jarvis I’m an Australian actor and producer. Studied at NIDA drama school, have acted in several Australian productions, have my hand in two production companies – Hole in One Productions and TSL films, have also worked internationally.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Tyson Jarvis: Well I’ve always loved movies , I remember going to the cinemas regularly from a young age with my mother. I always wanted to be an actor basically from then but I never thought it was possible. My mum helped me sign up to acting school, I was quick to get an agent and then a speaking role on tv. I wanted to improve as much as I could, between takes or scenes I wasn’t in I would sit back and watch and learn what everyone was doing. I’ve always liked the idea of having control creatively to tell the stories in film so I started hole in one productions with mike Smallwood and Archie then also started TSL films to help pump out extra content and different projects such as documentary and reality shows.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of Rest Stop or some updates?

Tyson Jarvis: I successfully converted the story of rest stop into our very own screenplay with my producing and writing partner L.A knight, it’s very true and respectful to the great Stephen kings story. We have locked locations down already and we are going through the final stages of casting currently, I generally like to have a famous cameo per each one of my movies so keep a look out.

SKSM: Who would be involved into this project?

Tyson Jarvis: Well I’ll be making my directorial debut, producing and playing the lead role of John. My producing partner LA will be executive producer and the main script writer. All other crew and cast are currently under wraps.

SKSM: How come you picked Rest Stop to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Tyson Jarvis: I found it a very chilling thriller that had a lot of intensity and power. Also love the complexity of the character John dykstra, I knew I wanted to play him from the moment I read the story.

SKSM: I guess it’s very soon to asking this question but… where the premiere will be? Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Tyson Jarvis: I always premiere my movies in my hometown of Colac where I grew up in the local cinema.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Tyson Jarvis: I haven’t seen any other adaptations of Rest Stop.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Tyson Jarvis: I’m a huge fan of Stephen and a lot of his work such as IT. Im also a massive fan of 11.22.63 I’m very critical on time travel but this was done beautifully and adapted to Television very well with James Franco doing a wonderful job as the lead role. Another mention of course the shining legendary horror, there’s much more I’m a fan of but honestly to many to answer.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Tyson Jarvis: My buddy who is a massive Stephen king fan told me about the $1 stories. I actually thought it was a joke. I purchased rest stop within five minutes of finding out it was true. I think it’s a fantastic thing, one of the greatest writers of all time provides this wonderful opportunity for independent and aspiring film makers.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Tyson Jarvis: Well 2020 started out really busy for me, I landed a role in a new gritty crime thriller called Hoodlumz which is an Australian Netflix film. Also started the Mason murders which is one of my own productions, a terrifying horror set in the 80s and I also landed a role as a bush ranger in a massive untitled film which will be released in several cinemas world wide. We were meant to start rest stop in June but obviously with covid 19 had to shut down all productions and push back rest stop. Me and the TSL guys are currently making a stay at home film called 24 hours an end of the world thriller type film which is shaping up very well and will be released online in July.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Tyson Jarvis: Well I’m a pretty decent basketball player for someone who is only 5’9

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Tyson Jarvis: Don’t ever give up, keep filming projects. Try new things with story telling , think outside the box. Practise daily and network like crazy.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Tyson Jarvis: Everyone stay inside, wash your hands, take care of your family and also a big thank you to all the essential workers.

He is the Cinematographer of Jon Mann‘s Popsy Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jack Leahy: My name is Jack, among other things I’m a cinematographer, currently based in Nova Scotia.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a cinematographer?

Jack Leahy: The realization that I wanted to head in that direction was a result of multiple intersecting factors. Truth be told I’m still working towards becoming a cinematographer! I’m sure there are people who wouldn’t consider me as such. It can be a bit of an elusive, self-proclaimed title. I’ve been shooting still photography since I was in high school, and I didn’t really know what a DP was until I started watching a lot of movies while in university. Discovering the role of the cinematographer, DOP excited me deeply, it felt like a natural progression from my photography and YouTube videos I was making at the time. The idea that directors had stories to tell and that I could light and photograph their story with them was so exciting. Around the same time I reached out to Paul McCurdy and Kevin Fraser, two incredible Halifax based DPs that took long coffee meetings with me. Those couple of hours really solidified that cinematography was the direction I wanted to head.

SKSM: How do you communicate with a director to design a visual strategy for a film?

Jack Leahy: For this film, Popsy, Jon and I were floating references back and forth months before we shot. Jon had a list of movies and a playlist of songs, both of which gave me insight into the world that Jon was after. I had a few photography and colour references that I shared with Jon. Once we decided on a 4:3 aspect ratio and shot-listed a few sequences we were on the right page and had the visual approach was pretty solidified.

SKSM: You worked with Jon Mann on this film, what do you think the relationship between a director and a DOP should be?

Jack Leahy: It should be like working with Jon! A mentor of mine suggested that my mission should be to go find 5 more Jons, I’m still working on that. Ideally, the relationship on all project types is a collaborative one, playing off each other’s strengths and weaknesses. Jon has also become a close friend of mine since shooting Popsy, working alongside friends makes it all the more fun.

SKSM: You worked on a Dollar Baby based on a Stephen King short story. Was it your most challenging film?

Jack Leahy: It’s been long enough now that I don’t remember it like that. We had a blast making the film. It was certainly pushing the limits of what I was capable of at the time but we pulled it off.

SKSM: When you’re going to shoot, what are your favourite lenses? formats?

Jack Leahy: There are so many interesting optic solutions out there. Most of which I have yet to have the opportunity to use. I have a couple of Pentax still photography lenses that I’ve had forever, and adapted to EF so I can shoot with them digitally. They are my favourite of the lenses I have access to. I’m excited to get my hands on some BlackWing7’s at some point.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jack Leahy: There was this hilarious improv take that Sean McCullum did as the Mall Cop. I’m not sure how much of it he prepared but it was pretty incredible. It didn’t end up serving the scene so it’s not in the film but it was a good laugh on set.

SKSM: Who are some of your influences (favourite DOPs/films)?

Jack Leahy: I’ve been certainly inspired by the greats who’ve pushed boundaries in the field such as Bradford, Savides, Deakins, Chivo, Cronenweth (both of them). But the takeaways from them are elusive and overarching. The biggest influences have come from Canadian DPs that I have been generous with their time and expertise. I’ve gained the most practical knowledge from Paul McCurdy, Kevin Fraser, Mat Barkley, Catherine Lutes, Jeff Wheaton.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favourite works and adaptations?

Jack Leahy: I am certainty a King fan. The Shinning is a stand out for me, I’ve also just started to read 11/22/63, it’s a beast of a book but I’m enjoying it so far.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jack Leahy: You’re catching me during the COVID-19 pandemic so there has been a bit of break from shooting. I’ve taken this time to catch up on movies I haven’t watched, and update my website. I’ve also been working on a Litemat style LED build, sourcing the parts from the wonderful people at MOSS LED.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jack Leahy: That I represented Canada internationally a handful of times in Sprint Canoe.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jack Leahy: I’m your fan if you read this! Thanks for having me on here.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Jack Leahy: If anyone has made it this far, check out my website at www.jackleahy.ca and email me at jackgleahy@gmail.com

He is the Composer of Will Patrick RobertsMorning Deliveries Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Paul Duffy: My name is Paul Duffy and I love horror films. I am a professional musician and composer

SKSM: How did you become involved with Morning Deliveries?

Paul Duffy: I met Will Patrick Roberts (director) at a gig and then through the power of social media I learnt he was a film maker and we started vibeing about our love of films.

SKSM: How did you get started as a composer and what do you do on production?

Paul Duffy: I’ve always been a huge fan the horror genre. I remember seeing the original George A. Romero’s Dawn Of The Dead for the first time when I was a teenager and it blowing my mind. Those early zombie movies especially had the most brilliant soundtracks with those eerie 70’s synths and over the top impact sounds. So, when I started making my own soundtrack inspired music I wanted to recreate that. They’re the most fun.

SKSM: How did you get started to wrote the Soundtrack for Morning Deliveries?

Paul Duffy: Will and I got talking once and he mentioned he was working on a Steven King inspired short film and I immediately jumped at the chance of being involved. He sent over some test footage and imagery to me of Morning Deliveries along with some musical ideas and it was all so good that I knew exactly what to do for the theme. The John Carpenter soundtracks were a big influence.

SKSM: Is this your most challenging audio so far?

Paul Duffy: I wanted to give Will my absolute best work as I loved the project so much. I went and upgraded my home studio and started playing with some new sounds. It was great challenging myself but once I got started it came quite naturally and the ideas just flowed. You have to remember to enjoy yourself.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the music that you would like to tell me about?

Paul Duffy: I sent over a rough demo with the main riff but knew I had to make more of it. Then my wife and I went on a vacation to Universal Studios Florida in October and,of course, they have the annual Halloween Horror Nights event on! (I recommend going to any horror nerd like myself) The theme was 80’s horror so the music they played in the park was brilliant. When I arrived back home I found myself super charged full of electro, 80’s, gore, Stranger Things, Steven King nostalgia. It all poured into the finished music for the film and it fitted perfectly.

SKSM: After Morning Deliveries up did you write more music? If so what?

Paul Duffy: I love to make music all the time and try to record as much as I can. I’m messing with more sounds and techniques to broaden my musical making skills right now. The great thing with creativity is that you’re always learning.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Paul Duffy: I have recently learnt how to make 8-bit computer game music, like the old Saga games, and I’m working on a personal project with that. It’s a completely different way of thinking about music and arrangement but it’s really, really fun.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Paul Duffy: To me, King is one of the masters of horror/sci-fi. He’s like The Beatles of horror writing. Without even knowing it you will have read, heard or seen his work. He’s embedded into the subconscious minds of us all and throughout pop culture. His stories and imagery will always be around.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Paul Duffy: I’m the bassist in a band called The Coral and have been for 20 years.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be musicians?

Paul Duffy: Now technology can let anyone be a creative whether it be music or film making. So I say don’t be afraid to mess up and sometimes you can be your own worst critic. Most importantly always remember to just have fun and not be so serious.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Paul Duffy: Thank you and stay spooky.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Paul Duffy: Give Morning Deliveries a watch. It’s a brilliant piece of work. Also check out my Sound Cloud. It’s the one with Sasquatch as my avatar.

He played in Red Clark‘s Gray Matter Dollar Baby film as Henry.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: I studied theatre in college and spent many years as a professional actor in Chicago, mostly on stage.  I’ve written a couple plays that have been widely produced in the U.S. and not-so-widely in Europe.  I’m currently on staff at a university in the Chicago suburbs and don’t pursue acting much anymore except for the occasional V.O. or on-camera industrial.  I did start directing for stage earlier this year.  Though incredibly demanding, it was a rewarding experience which I may do again—though Covid-19 has pretty much sidelined live theatre for the near future.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: I was a musician in high school, playing bass in the pit orchestra and secretly envying those kids brave enough to get up on stage.  I didn’t come to it myself until my second year of college in 1977.  I hadn’t declared a major yet and at the time I was dabbling in Egyptology of all things.  Theatre seemed a lot livelier, so I went for it.  It was mostly my love of Shakespeare that drew me in.  I’ve been lucky over the years to have acted in over half his plays.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Gray matter Dollar Baby film?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: In 2008 I acted with Adrian DiGiovanni in The Nest, a short film directed by Tim Zwica.  A couple years later Adrian was an initial producer of Gray Matter, and he pulled me in to read for Henry.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: It’s so elemental.  The bone cold chill of winter, a tense trek through a dark forest, a mysterious house in a remote setting.  It has the feel of a scary story told in hushed voices around a campfire.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: Well, since Stephen King created the character of Henry, it definitely wasn’t written for me!

SKSM: You worked with Red Clark on this film, how was that?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: I loved working with Red.  He’s very creative, patient, focused, and a real sweetheart besides.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: I’ll always remember being captured and dragged to my demise.  I was dragged across the floor by crew, of course, not a monster.  I can’t think how many times we reshot that.  I could say it was “a real drag,” and yeah, it was uncomfortable for sure.  But you’ll never forget even pretending to be dragged to a horrible death.  All those interior shots were legitimately creepy.  Skulking around in dark rooms, the beams of our flashlights dancing across the walls.  It really put you in the mood.

Another thing I recall is our pick-up shots in the woods.  We needed to reshoot some things long after the snow was gone, but Red recreated it with white material stretched out through the woods strictly within the camera shot.  At the time I thought this can’t work, but it totally does.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: I’ve stayed in touch with Red and with Aaron Christensen (Bertie).  Aaron does a Scare-a-thon fundraiser every October when he solicits pledges for every horror movie he watches and reviews online over the course of the month leading up to Halloween, so we always reconnect then at least.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: I directed a production of Steve Martin’s play Picasso at the Lapin Agile a couple months ago.  My last on-camera work was a promotion called Cards Against Humanity Hacks the Election, which is still on YouTube and was a lot of fun to shoot.  Nothing in the works right now though, what with the Covid-19 lockdown.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: Definitely.  I’ve read over ten of his novels and one short story collection, though it didn’t include Gray Matter.  He’s always been a terrific writer, and I think he’s doing some of his best work these days, like Finders Keepers and The Outsider.  During the coronavirus crisis I decided to reread The Stand—which may have been a mistake! Combined with the actual news on TV, it was beyond unnerving.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: In the last few years I developed an obsession with cephalopods, and octopuses in particular.  I’ve gotten to handle a giant Pacific octopus named Petunia and been bitten by a Caribbean dwarf I found in the surf.  I now volunteer on weekends as a docent at Chicago’s Shedd Aquarium just so I can connect with other octopus fans.  (And no, they are not monsters.  They can actually be quite sweet.)

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Scott Lynch- Giddings: I hope you enjoy Gray Matter.  It was a long process but great fun to work on.  While not a huge fan of horror movies myself, I have to say that acting in them has been the most fun I’ve ever had on camera.

 

He played in Matthew Maio Mackay‘s Dollar Baby A Tale of the Laundry Game as Rocky.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Marc Clement: My name is Marc Clement, I an Actor, writer, director, cinematographer, editor, singer, songwriter, bass player. I have a theatre company called STARC PRODUCTIONS with my partner Stefanie Rossi. STARC puts on 3 shows a year and had been up for many awards and winning a few also. I also teach acting and have made many short films.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Marc Clement: I have been acting for as long as I can remember, having my first lead role at 5 in school and it grew from there. Having been nominated for best actor in South Australia last year I feel I am definitely on the right path in life and would do nothing else.

SKSM: How did you become involved in A tale of the laundry game Dollar Baby film?

Marc Clement: I first met Matthew during a project I am working on had him for work experience and since then Matthew has proven himself to be a force in the industry working relentlessly and producing some amazing work.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Marc Clement: It’s the typical clever, suspenseful writing of Stephen King that keeps readers and watchers guessing

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Marc Clement: No I didn’t have to audition. Matthew asked me if I wanted to play the role and after reading his adaptation I was very keen to be involved, I also knew the DOP very well so it was an easy choice.

SKSM: You worked with Matthew Maio Mackay on this film, how was that?

Marc Clement: Matthew is an important part of the film making future of South Australia and hope fully Australia.  He is fresh and keen and learning more and more very project he completes.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Marc Clement: Every moment with fellow actor Brendan Cooney who is one of my best friends. Its always a pleasure to hang out with him, we have worked on numerous projects and we have so much fun together.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Marc Clement: I am working on my own TV Series called ‘Alright with Albright’ which is a comedy about home coming and redemption, very quirky and off the wall. I am writer actor and director and will play 5 characters.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Marc Clement: I am a huge fan of his work and anyone who enjoys reading a films in general know of his work and the legacy he will leave behind.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Marc Clement: I can juggle and ride a Uni-Cycle

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Marc Clement: Hi everyone, thanks for reading and look out for more of Matthews work and also STARC PRODUCTIONS & LEADING LINES work.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Marc Clement: Thanks!

She played in Mark Hensley‘s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film as a Victim.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Amy Scribner: I am an actor and writer living in Los Angeles.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Amy Scribner: I’ve been acting since I was five and realized I wanted to pursue it profesionally after I started my first corporate job in New York City after college.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby film?

Amy Scribner: I know the director and writer, Mark and Peggy, from Naked Angels Tuesdays@9 Los Angeles, a cold reading series, and have acted in another one of their films.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Amy Scribner: The story of the slippery slope between love, obsession, and madness can be interpreted in many ways.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Amy Scribner: I don’t know if the part was written for me, but, fortunately, Mark and Peggy thought of me for the role.

SKSM: You worked with Mark Hensley on this film, how was that?

Amy Scribner: I’m so impressed with Mark.  He decided to start directing and just did it, learning as he went.  He’s so accomplished in sound that he brings a lot to the table in film.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Amy Scribner: Planning what a murder should look like is funny when you’re with the right people.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Amy Scribner: Absolutely. I’m friends with Mark and Peggy and several others.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Amy Scribner: Writing, recording voiceover, and shooting short films with my husband while we’re in quarantine.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Amy Scribner: I admire his storytelling and writing but am generally not drawn to horror.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Amy Scribner: I write and perform sketch comedy.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Amy Scribner: Thanks for reading.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Amy Scribner: Thanks for representing short films.

He played in Red Clark‘s Gray Matter Dollar Baby film as Timmy Grenadine.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Kenneth Martin: I’m Kenneth, a 20-year-old student at Beloit College studying political science and theatre. When I’m not at college, I’m in Chicago playing video games, watching Netflix, or volunteering for progressive political campaigns. In addition to all of that, I also enjoy fencing, soccer, sailing, chess, and quizbowl.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Kenneth Martin: When I was a kid, both of my parents were ensemble members of Stage Left Theatre in Chicago, so I spent a lot of my childhood around rehearsals and performances. In 5th grade, I decided that I was tired of just watching plays; I wanted to be in them. So I auditioned and miraculously got the part in a Stage Left play.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Gray Matter Dollar Baby film?

Kenneth Martin: One of the actors, Aaron Christensen, was friends with my dad and told him they were looking for kids to audition. I was super excited at the chance of not just being in a short film, but being in a horror film with blood and guts and monsters, so I said yes.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Kenneth Martin: It’s creepy and very gross.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Kenneth Martin: I did have to audition. I’m not sure how good my audition was, but apparently I was lucky enough to be the only kid to audition, so I got cast!

SKSM: You worked with Red Clark on this film, how was that?

Kenneth Martin: He was great to work with; he’s very smart, kind, and good at directing young actors who don’t know what they’re doing.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Kenneth Martin: My first day of filming was the day before my 13th birthday, and in a stroke of luck it premiered on my 18th birthday. Because of this, Gray Matter holds a very special place in my heart as marking the beginning and end of my adolescence.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Kenneth Martin: I don’t regularly talk to any of them, but I occasionally enjoy reading the horror blog run by Aaron Christensen’s alter ego, Dr. AC.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Kenneth Martin: Like all other college students, I’m trying to figure out how to deal with classes at home for the rest of the semester.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Kenneth Martin: I am! Gray Matter was actually my introduction to him. So far, my favorite book of his is The Eyes of the Dragon, which I think does not deserve its negative reputation.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Kenneth Martin: I’m an incredibly picky eater.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Kenneth Martin: Stay healthy and keep in touch with people outside your household!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Kenneth Martin: Robert’s Rules are bad and should be abolished.

He is the filmmaker of Sneakers Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Gino Alfonso: My name is Gino Alfonso, I’m a writer/producer director and some times actor

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Gino Alfonso: When I saw Jurassic Park when I was 10 years old.

SKSM: When did you make Sneakers? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Gino Alfonso: I made Sneakers about 6 years ago, I got special permission from Stephen King to do it as it was not on the list of $1 Babies and explained to his people how much I loved the story and he approved me to do it. It took one weekend to film, cost about a $1,000 to make.

SKSM: How come you picked Sneakers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Gino Alfonso: I loved the dark humor in it and it was classic King at the pinnacle of his short story form. It felt very much like a Twilight Zone episode.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Gino Alfonso: I had read an article with Frank Darabont, I believe in Fangoria and he said that’s how he made The Woman in the Room and helped him build his relationship with King to make Shawshank Redemption in my opinion one of the top 10 best King adaptations ever.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Gino Alfonso: When the main character is in the bathroom and trying to take a crap with the ghost talking to him, I couldn’t stop laughing at the actors sound FXs he made for farting, I know childish but it was hysterical.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Gino Alfonso: I think the internet is an amazing way for young and new filmmakers to get recognized even without going the festival route, there is no excuse not to be creating content. Everything is at our fingertips these days. You can make your brand for yourself younger and younger these days.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Gino Alfonso: Some of the sound quality I wasn’t thrilled with but the makeup FXs and visual FXs have been highly acclaimed

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Gino Alfonso: We had a few small runs

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Gino Alfonso: Huge fan, I own everything available in print and on film, I own most 1st editions and even some foriegn versions. Stand By Me, Shawshank Redemption, Green Mile, The Mist, 1922, Gerald’s Game, Doctor Sleep (much to my amazement)

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Gino Alfonso: I did not, just Ms. Morehouse who runs the program but she spoke to him on my behalf to get the approval for the rights to Sneakers.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Gino Alfonso: I do, but not as a short. I’m trying to build the track record I need to adapt a novel. One of my dream books is Rose Madder to adapt, though I’m not big on reboots, I’d love to do a darker more true version of Needful Things.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Gino Alfonso: My first feature Compatible is currently in post production which is a horror thriller starring Eileen Dietz (The Exorcist) Ari Lehman (Friday the 13th) Mindy Robinson (Evil Bong series) Elissa Dowling (Automation, Girl on the Third Floor) a film I was an associate producer on and actor called Attack of the Unknown is being released theatrically this summer starring Richard Grieco (21 Jump Street, Night at the Roxeberry) Robert LaSardo (The Mule, Waterworld) and Tara Reid (American Pie) and I’m in development on my next two features but can’t reveal much about those yet.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Gino Alfonso: I am an openly gay filmmaker and have been married to my husband for almost a decade.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Gino Alfonso: Thanks for reading and watching King and my work as well.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Gino Alfonso: Any producers/investors reading this I have dozens of scripts for sale and always looking for financing/partnerships feel free to get in contact on any major social media platform

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