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He is the filmmaker behind All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Seth Friedman: My name is Seth Friedman, I am a filmmaker and a sophomore in college.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Seth Friedman: For as long as I can remember, I’ve loved stories and movies in particular. I remember seeing Raiders of the Lost Ark, and (SPOILER ALERT) when the Nazi’s faces melted off, I was fascinated with how they did that. I did research and went deep into the behind the scenes footage to learn about how it was done without killing the actor. From that, my passion for cinema was born.

SKSM: When did you make All that you love will be carried away? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Seth Friedman: The process of making All That You Love Will Be Carried Away was very interesting. I applied for the story through Stephen King’s website and got access much faster than I had expected. From the time I got the rights to the end of post-production was about a year and a half.

SKSM: How come you picked All that you love will be carried away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Seth Friedman: Originally, I had permission to make Here There Be Tygers, but the story wasn’t resonating with me as much as King’s other stories. I decided to look over the list of stories once again and found All That You Love Will Be Carried Away. It was perfect. I like to create a new challenge for myself with each new film I make and filming a single character in a single location with little dialogue seemed like the perfect way to push myself. Beyond that, I saw an opportunity to inject my own personality and experiences into the character. I struggle with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, so I decided to give Alfie the same struggle. Making Alfie into a man who is afraid of germs yet spends his life in ratty motels and gas station bathrooms became a fascinatingly cathartic paradox for me.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Seth Friedman: My friend, George Long, who you previously interviewed, brought this program to my attention and I was certain that he was kidding. I did some more research and found out that this wasn’t a joke at all. I went on to the website and applied through their forum, and to my surprise, they granted me the rights!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Seth Friedman: I can talk for hours about production, but I would be doing a huge disservice to the film if I didn’t mention Sam Smith, the cinematographer, who made the film look and feel like it does. Also, Charles Richard “Chuck” Landers really brought a lot of ideas and stories to the role of Alfie Zimmer. Chuck had never acted before but had always enthralled me with every story he has told me. We met up for what was supposed to be an hour to discuss the script but ended up turning into four and a half hours of sharing stories back and forth.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Seth Friedman: Honestly, I find it very frustrating. Don’t get me wrong, I think the Dollar Baby program is incredible, but that is its only flaw. I can’t quantify how many times someone has asked to see the film and I had to explain to them the legal issues (and I am by no means a lawyer).

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Seth Friedman: The film is very particular. I designed the script to be paced so that we, the audience, feel the emotions alongside Alfie. When he is sad or bored, so are we (but hopefully not too bored). Life on the road for Alfie is slow and full of little moments. I tried to maintain King’s brilliance as much as possible, while making it my own. The performance of Chuck Landers really has resonated with audiences. When I recorded his screen test, I knew that he was going to elevate the script far beyond anything I could’ve hoped.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Seth Friedman: So far, the film premiered at The AMC Empire in Times Square, as well as Cincinnati, Rochester, and Amsterdam.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Seth Friedman: I am a massive King fan. I love seeing the different ways that his works can be interpreted. When we were making the film, we discussed two ways of adapting his material: Kubrickian or Darabont-esque. Frank Darabont has made some of the best King adaptations (from Shawshank to Green Mile, or his own Dollar Baby short film), which Kubrick’s The Shining really only brushes on the original work. The range of adaptation between these two landmark filmmakers is astonishing, and it is very interesting to see where the newest adaptations fall.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Seth Friedman: I’ve heard stories of King reaching out to some filmmakers, and even having a shelf holding the DVDs of his favorite Dollar Baby films, but I have not personally had contact with him. I included my information in the DVD case I sent him but have not heard back. Who knows? Maybe I’ll hear from him the moment I finish this interview.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Seth Friedman: Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, many of my project have been put on hold or cancelled. I was getting ready to shoot a short film loosely based on The Body (and inspired by the tone of the film adaptation, Stand By Me), which follows two kids who accidentally discover the body of Jimmy Hoffa. Aside from that, I have a number of very exciting projects I am trying to develop, but at this time nothing is confirmed.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Seth Friedman: After watching my films, it is natural for people to think I am a bummer of a person, but I actually write stand-up comedy with a friend who performs regularly in Los Angeles.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Seth Friedman: Thank you for reaching out! I am always excited to discuss this project, which holds a special place in my heart. I would encourage anyone who is interested in filmmaking (or even if you’re slightly interested in filmmaking) to apply for the rights to a King story. It will permanently change the way you see movies and literature.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Seth Friedman: I suppose I will use this as the place to shamelessly plug my first feature length film. I was lucky enough to once again work with Chuck Landers, Sam Smith, and tons of great people. The film follows disgraced screenwriter Thomas Clark (Chuck Landers) as he fights to clear his name and release his masterpiece. (Link: https://youtu.be/MTChAoiZvGo)

 

He is the man behind Maxwell Edison. The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Warren Ray: My name is Warren Ray. I’m a singer-songwriter musician /recording artist. I was a professional child actor.  In my late twenties I got involved in doing film work and started acting again I have since been in about 15 Independent films.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Warren Ray: When I was a boy my father was a stage actor he also was a technical director and set designer for theater. At a young age I knew I wanted to be involved in making movies. initially I wanted to do special effects I was fascinated with miniature models, spaceship design and robotics. My parents were both theater folks and that’s how I got involved in acting.

SKSM: When did you make Maxwell Edison? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Warren Ray: Maxwell Edison was filmed in 2011 I believe, although I had done some small Parts in film work previously, I had just finished starring in my first feature film called “Nothing in the flowers.” That film was directed by David Brewer in 2010. After that film was completed, I asked David to became the cinematographer on “Maxwell Edison” because we had just completed a feature film together and had developed a sort of shorthand understanding for each other and I knew we worked well together. I had a few months preparation before filming, I believe it took us 4 days of shooting then another few weeks to edit. I think the film ended up costing about $500 to shoot.

SKSM: How come you picked The man who loved flowers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Warren Ray: When I read The Man Who loved flowers it didn’t contain much dialogue and presented a visual challenge. Because I didn’t want to do a film with a bunch of voice over narration. Someone I respected had said a bunch of narration is the easy way out in filmmaking, So I thought a 60s mod style film might be interesting to try and pull off.

SKSM: Maxwell Edison it’s not only based on Stephen King’s story, but also on the Beatles song ‘Maxwell’s Silver Hammer. Can you tell me how the idea came about?

Warren Ray: When I read The Man Who Loved flowers it reminded me of the Beatles song Maxwell’s Silver Hammer. It made me wonder if mr. King had not been inspired by The Beatles tune when he wrote the short story, so I thought it may be interesting to do a mash-up version of the two. Because The Man Who Loved flowers had already been shot by a few other Dollar Baby film and I wanted mine to be different and unique.

SKSM: Music is a very important part in Maxwell Edison film. I read that you had a good experience in music before making the movie.

Warren Ray: I had been a singer-songwriter recording artist and had enjoyed some very limited success in trying to be a rockstar for several years, so music played a big part in my life and all my favorite films always had the best music in them. My favorite films seem to be the ones that the music had a very intricate part in their success. Films like 2001, Saturday Night Fever, Rocky, Star Wars, anything Quentin Tarantino ever did.

SKSM: Your short film was the first Dollar Baby to be shot in 3D. Can you tell me about it?

Warren Ray: Actually Maxwell Edison was shot in a regular form then it was transferred inside a computer program  that transferred the film into the old school 3D format the kind that you wear the red and blue glasses in order to see it in 3 dimension, Not the modern type of 3D we now enjoy in movie theaters. This appealed to me because of the Retro vibe that I had chosen to give this particular Film Production. And the thought of everyone wearing paper glasses in order to enjoy my film you made me grin. Unfortunately when projected on big screen it doesn’t work as well in 3D as it does on a small screen like a computer or a television. So therefore we have a regular and a 3D version of maxwell Edison.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Warren Ray: I had seen a version of “In the Death Room” that was screening at a film festival in which another one of my films called “Super Rocket V8” was also playing. Of course I was curious how they procured the rights to a Stephen King story, I did some research and the rest is history.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Warren Ray: I don’t know if it would considered funny or not but in the opening sequence where Maxwell is walking under the Skyway along the River Bank. That is kind of a sketchy area for crime also with homeless folks living in tent Camps… so me walking around in a suit and tie carrying a flower box with a big red bow on it and David with his expensive camera gear made for an interesting spectacle for sure. It was just the two of us down there under the Skyway shooting that footage so we had to watch our backs in fear of losing the camera gear or someone assuming I had money because I was wearing a suit. A few fellows did come out of the bushes and watch us from a distance, I think they thought we were doing some type of wedding photography or something, then the scenes that I’m walking around downtown in the city some people were congratulating me, I think they thought it was my wedding day, that was kind of funny it was easier not to explain what we were really doing.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Warren Ray: Today at Maxwell Edison has screened in 14 different countries including Russia two times at various Dollar Baby film festivals. Of course I would love to see it released on DVD with other dollar babies as an anthology. At the time of this interview we are in the midst of the Corona virus pandemic and there is talk of trying to organize and online Dollar Baby Film Festival. I hope to be involved in that Festival but as I understand they are still trying to get permission from mr. King’s office to do so.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Warren Ray: For the most part reviews have been favorable. My favorite review however was one that said that the film looked beautiful and was stylish and had a great music score but it contained a gratuitous Gore scene at the end that went on for too long. That review struck me is pretty hilarious. Considering we had already edited out at least a minute of bloody Gore the film had contained before the Final Cut.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Warren Ray: As I have mentioned before Maxwell Edison has screened several Dollar Baby festivals All Over America, in Spain, the Netherlands, Canada and Russia. At this point I’m hoping that the online film festival becomes a reality and that they are able to obtain permission from mr. King’s office in order to do so.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Warren Ray: I like The Shining although Stanley Kubrick took some liberties with the original story. I have no right to complain about that because I have done the same thing myself with The Man Who Loved flowers. The Cycle of the werewolf novella I believe it’s my favorite text, I don’t care for the adaptation called “Silver Bullet” I thought it gave away the Whodunnit Style plot much too early in the story line. How many times written text doesn’t transfer to film very well and it poses a challenge for the filmmaker. I would like to have a crack at filming cycle of the werewolf and staying more true to the original text. When I first started reviewing the various short stories available for the Dollar Baby program I had hopes that Cycle of the werewolf was among them sadly it was not, but actually deserves a feature film presentation anyway.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Warren Ray: No, I have only communicated with mr. King’s office staff but I hope someday he will see Maxwell Edison of course.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Warren Ray: As I said before Cycle of the werewolf would be my choice if I had the opportunity to film another Stephen King story.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Warren Ray: I had a lead role in a new horror Anthology called “Cryptids” I hope that will be released this year. I am currently working on mastering a music recording project I finnished recently, it is a 6 song EP entitled “Alberta” it was done on Antiquated 70s 2-inch tape gear, so that posed some technical challenges and difficulties but it has a warm sound and I look forward two people hearing it.

I also have a starring role in “Nathan Thomas Milner’s” next feature film called “On a Dark and Bloody ground” but that production is on hold because of the covid-19 pandemic for now.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Warren Ray: One interesting thing that most people don’t know about me was I lived in a haunted house when I was a child. We only stayed there for 4 months at one point my parents came into my room and the bed was levitating off of the floor and vibrating violently, I was screaming and crying at the top of my lungs. It stopped when my parents came into the room but they witnessed it, I was maybe 7 years old. When I asked them what had happened? they covered up the truth and told me they had just been playing a joke on me, I told them” it wasn’t very funny”. After we moved away my parents told me the truth about the house and all the haunting that they had experienced  because they had hidden it from me but I was afraid of the dark for those four months i do recall that. This life experience involving my entire family also being witness to it, changed my view of the world and my spiritual belief system forever. True story.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Warren Ray: Hey Oscar, thanks for the continued help and support. Keep you beautiful family safe and healthy my friend.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Warren Ray: My full music catalog is available on spotify, Amazon, and YouTube.

 

He played in Mark Hensley’s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby Film as Young Man.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Sam Meader: I play ‘The Man’, an emotionally-intense character to define… To me, he was perfectly sane; but to you, he most-definitely wasn’t. I’m originally from the UK, but now work in Los Angeles. If I can create everyday, I’m happy…

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Sam Meader: I grew up performing in a rock band and always loved the freedom of expression it gave me. Eventually, enough bottles were thrown at me, and around the age of eighteen I started to explore acting – that’s when I found my true passion.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film?

Sam Meader: I had worked with Mark Hensley and Peggy Lewis in the past, developing their brilliant play ‘London Calling: The Musical’ – the first musical to officially involve the iconic music of The Clash. I loved working with them so much that we’ve always stayed in touch, so when they reached out with ‘The Man Who Loved Flowers’ I naturally said yes.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Sam Meader: I think we all have a yearning for fear, provided that we’re one-step removed from it. Peggy Lewis did a fantastic job of penning a suspenseful script, and Stephen King’s characters always remind us that we’re one personal disaster away from releasing our inner-psychopath.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Sam Meader: Mark Hensley knew my work, and what I could potentially bring to the role. Or maybe he just thought I needed to release that inner-psychopath for a minute. Either way, it was a match.

SKSM: You worked with Mark Hensley on this film, how was that?

Sam Meader: This was my first time working with Mark as a director, having previously worked with him as a producer. I think the many areas of the industry Mark has worked in really bled into him being a great director. He articulately knew what he wanted, and consistently considered every aspect of the production – but his focus was always on the overall storytelling, rather than the minutia, which I greatly admired.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Sam Meader: I had previously acted with Amy Scribner as a disgruntled mother and son, so hitting her over the head with a hammer was an amusing turn of retribution. Now it’s her turn for vengeance…

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Sam Meader: I still keep in touch with Mark Hensley and Peggy Lewis; they throw good pool parties…

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Sam Meader: I’ve just had a feature film premiere called INTO THE ARMS OF DANGER, in which I play the killer son of crazy ‘Momma’ Cathy Moriarty. Catch it on Lifetime TV, LMN, and streaming networks. You can also see me in the upcoming season of BOSCH (Amazon) and THE ORVILLE (Fox).

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Sam Meader: The Dark Tower was one of the first adult series I read as a kid. Which is perhaps why I have such an active imagination…

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Sam Meader: I can fly a plane… kinda…

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Sam Meader: Thanks for reading — now go make something!!

And for my buddy, Jon Degnan – shoutout to The Escape Fall and the Darling Sweethearts…

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Sam Meader:

Instagram – @skmeader

IMdB – https://www.imdb.me/sammeader/

Web – https://www.samuelmeader.com

 

He played in Mark Hensley’s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby Film as Detective Sal Deangelo.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Phil Idrissi: I am principally an actor, but have been doing a bit of writing as well. I’m a late-bloomer to the arts having spent the first 25 years of my career in Sales, Marketing and Business Development, mostly in the Insurance, Software and Packaging industries.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor? 

Phil Idrissi: I was almost 40.  I had been working on my first film in Seattle called “The Scratch” and we had just wrapped a gruling 9 hour shoot in the cold, pouring rain of February. I was exhausted, driving home from that shoot and just caught a glimmer of the sunrise over the horizen. I just knew, at that moment, this was what I was supposed to do with my life.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby film? 

Phil Idrissi: I knew Mark Hensley and Peggy Lewis from a previous Project they wrote and directed. He reached out to me and asked if I’d be interested in playing the role.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much? 

Phil Idrissi: Well, unfortunately it’s a pretty timeless portrayal of mental illness and the pain, both endured and inflicted by someone dealing with a devistating loss.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Phil Idrissi: I’m sure there were many people that Mark could have asked to do this, but I just got lucky.

SKSM: You worked with Mark Hensley on this film, how was that?

Phil Idrissi: Mark’s an amazing director.  It was a very organized and efficient shoot, despite the normal challanges of shooting in a dense urban setting.  It really couldn’t have gone any smoother.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about? 

Phil Idrissi: There was a debate about the amount of blood they should use to cover the corpse (played by Peggy). That was a humerous moment.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Phil Idrissi: I occasionally see Guy Picot in my Cold Reading Group, LA TUESDAYS @ 9. Also, Mark and Peggy are my neighbors so we see each other occasionally. Mostly though I keep up with folks on Social Media

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Phil Idrissi: Up until the COVID19 Pandemic, I was enjoying a busy Network TV Pilot Season here in Los Angeles.  Hopefully, it will resume after this condition passes through.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work? 

Phil Idrissi: I’ve read parts of several of his books and, sure you could say I’m a fan. Horror, in general is not a genre I seek out in particular, however.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Phil Idrissi: I’m terrified of needles which has saved me from both experimenting with IV drug use and getting tattoos.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Phil Idrissi: Thank you for watching our Little film. I hope you enjoyed it.

 

She played in Matthew Maio Mackay‘s Dollar Baby A Tale of the Laundry Game as Bobby’s Wife.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Stefanie Rossi: I am a professional actor/singer living in Adelaide, South Australia. I have an Advanced Diploma of Arts (Acting) and have been working in the industry for the last 8 years both locally, nationally and internationally. I currently run my own theatre company (STARC Productions – check us out on Facebook!) as well as teach singing and acting and work with a number of the Universities around Adelaide helping conduct simulated patient-doctor scenarios for their training doctors. I am constantly involved in stage shows as well as film projects of varying sizes and work both in front of and behind the camera as a producer and 1st AD.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Stefanie Rossi: I loved performing/all things creative from a young age and naturally fell into Drama, Singing and Dance lessons, which I continued to do throughout my primary school and high school education. When I left high school I tried going to university but found that I wasn’t enjoying the work I was doing or really getting inspired. That’s when I decided to audition for the various acting institutions around Australia and make Acting my career. So I think I always inherently knew acting was my passion and what I wanted to do. It’s just a part of me. It’s in my blood. There really isn’t a choice for me.

SKSM: How did you become involved in A tale of the laundry game Dollar Baby film?

Stefanie Rossi: I had played a minor role in director Matthew Maio Mackey’s film smothered and he approached me about whether I would like to play a role in A Tale Of The Laundry Game, an invitation I of course accepted.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Stefanie Rossi: I think that all of the characters in A Tale Of The Laundry Game are very real people – raw, flawed and relatable in one way or another – and I think that is something that audience members crave and are drawn to, no matter how disturbing their actions or thought processes might be.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Stefanie Rossi: I didn’t have to audition for the part and I believe Matthew had me in mind for the part.

SKSM: You worked with Matthew Maio Mackay on this film, how was that?

Stefanie Rossi: Matthew is a director who really lets the actor play with their character and gives them freedom to experiment with their own ideas within each scene. He will then make little changes but he really lets you do your thing and trusts you, so that is great!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Stefanie Rossi: In one of my scenes I was required to look like I was taking some pills, which is harder to fake than it may sound haha! They kept falling out of my hands and then when we had to do retakes, got sticky due to touching the water I was ‘taking’ them with etc So there were definitely a few bloopers there!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Stefanie Rossi: Absolutely! I still have contact with everyone from Matthew to Rebecca the DOP and all of the actors.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Stefanie Rossi: These days my focus is spread across a number of projects but the main focus for me at the moment is my theatre company STARC Productions with whom I present 3 plays a year as well as with a medieval/fantasy film series I am involved in producing/acting in called WARPATH –Chronicle– (again, check it out on Facebook), a, 11 episode film series that we finished filming mid last year. We are currently in post-production on that and will be releasing a trailer for it very soon.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Stefanie Rossi: I had never really looked much into Stephen King’s work before doing this film but I had always respected him as a writer and a creative in general. I don’t handle watching horror/scary films very well but I’m always ok to act in them…go figure!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Stefanie Rossi: I think people would be surprised to know that I am 100% Italian. People often look at me in shock when I tell them that and say “but you’re so fair!” I also think they wouldn’t suspect that I’m a qualified personal trainer and am a strict vegan and have been for 12 years – the reaction I get when I tell people that is “but you look so healthy” haha!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Stefanie Rossi: No worries at all! Thanks for the interview. To the fans, I’d just like to say thanks for taking the time to check out the film! Enjoy and keep supporting the independent work of us artists out there!

 

He played in Warren Ray‘s Maxwell Edison. The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film as Tulip.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Demi Demaree: My name is Demi Demaree, and I’m an artist from Louisville, Ky.

I say artist, because I like to be involved in anything that is creative. My main focus has been music for a long time, but I have had the opportunity to do some acting here and there.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Demi Demaree: I wouldn’t call myself an actor per say. I’ve been a part of numerous skits from comedy to music videos etc, but have only had actual roles in a few films. This being one of them, and more recently I played a detective in One Must Fall by Antonio Pantoja.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Maxwell Edison. The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby film?

Demi Demaree: Warren actually reached out to me to see if I’d be interested. I think he just figured I’d be a good fit for the part.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Demi Demaree: The deeper the love, the deeper the hate they say. The vulnerability of the film draws people in I think.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Demi Demaree: No. He asked, and I showed up.

SKSM: You worked with Warren Ray on this film, how was that?

Demi Demaree: Warren is great. He’s a creative guy like myself, so it was an all around good time. Very natural.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Demi Demaree: Well, just like the other skits and films I’ve done, it seems like I’m never truly acting. It’s just more of  Demi if I was a flower guy. Or Demi if I was a detective haha!

This is why It’s hard for me to consider myself an actor. Props to the ones who can actually become different personalities and make it believable.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Demi Demaree: I was just talking to Warren today actually. I try and keep in touch with most people that I’ve worked with. Social media makes that pretty easy.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Demi Demaree: These days I‘ve been focused on my solo music project called Ipcus Pinecone. It’s  alternative hip hop. Last year I released an album series called Memoirs & Metaphors Part One and Two. I can be found on all social media outlets as well as my website www.ipcuspinecone.com You should check it out!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Demi Demaree: Of course! Can’t say I know anyone who isn’t on some level.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Demi Demaree: Surprised? That’s hard to say. I’m pretty much an open book, but a lot of people seem to be surprised that I am a cancer survivor. In 2001, I was diagnosed with Stage 4 non-hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Luckily, I’ve been in remission since 2001 as well.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Demi Demaree: First, thank you for reaching out to me! If anyone wants to look into my other projects, just go to my youtube page Demi Demaree or find me on social media! I’m always creating something!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Demi Demaree: Yes. We are in some very strange times right now. I hope that you and everyone else reading this remains safe through all of it. This too shall pass.

-Demi

 

He played in Mark Hensley’s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby Film as Detective Dave.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Guy Picot: I’m Guy Picot, a British actor/writer.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Guy Picot: Very late. I was working as a stage manager when I first saw the rehearsal process and thought I could do this.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby film?

Guy Picot: Mark Hensley asked me.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Guy Picot: Obsession is always compelling.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Guy Picot: I didn’t have to audition. It’s a small part so I wouldn’t claim it was written for me.

SKSM: You worked with Mark Hensley on this film, how was that?

Guy Picot: I like working with Mark, this was my third Project with him and we have worked together again since.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Guy Picot: It was, for me, a one-day shoot and was pretty smooth.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Guy Picot: I knew Phil Idrissi from a writers group and we are FB Friends.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Guy Picot: A play I wrote is being filmed, but we are currently in a holding pattern.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Guy Picot: Yes.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Guy Picot: I can’t drive.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Guy Picot:

 

He played in David Toms‘ Dollar Baby Bike as Richard Sifkitz.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Stephen Hope Wynne: I am Stephen Hope-Wynne a British born and based screen actor, writer and producer working across all media and entertainment platforms including games, advertising, etc

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Stephen Hope Wynne: I was born into a musician and actor family professionally established in theatre, opera and classical music. Growing up in theatres, sleeping in orchestra pits and generally living and breathing  as a child and teenager with music and theatre, classical music, mythology and constant literary influences made me a communicator without my choice.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Bike Dollar Baby film?

Stephen Hope Wynne: With out fully recalling how it came to be I was asked, I think, do an online Skype audition while the production team were actually based in China which was quite astonishing at the time. Vaguely, for my audition piece, I recall doing a dialogue excerpt from MOON which I adapted into a schizophrenic MONOLOGUE of the two person dialogue between established character SAM BELL and his newly arrived and harrowingly conflicting person-double SAM BELL. Gladly, the guys liked it and selected me to  participate in the Production.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Stephen Hope Wynne: The tooth an dnail teetering unpredictability of which way the story is about to turn and the tipping point of anyone’s paranoia, which, at some point in everyone’s lives we have all seen and can have found ourselves surprisingly victims to.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Stephen Hope Wynne: As explained I remote-auditioned for the part.

SKSM: You worked with David Toms on this film, how was that?

Stephen Hope Wynne: It was fun. The whole team were one of the most professionally prepared and diligent that I have experienced.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Stephen Hope Wynne: Yes, lots! We had a gas. In a confined space framing in bedroom scene the only way t get the shot with the lenses we had was for Cinematographer Rebecca Pittam to straddle on top of me holding the camera me as I laid in the bed which led to a lot of friendly banter and surprisingly interesting frames!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Stephen Hope Wynne: Occasionally I have sent clients to Rebecca for camera teams but I think everyone has been so busy coping with economic and other pressures.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Stephen Hope Wynne: Quite a lot. I am fronting a music act called SkyQuaker having written about 50 titles and the same in development we are about to release 2nd single via Aurora Eclipse Productions / Records.

SkyQuaker’s first single featured my late friend, famous Soviet Dissident and Human Rights campaigner Vladimir Buchovsky who died amid the recording.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Du-Blky2OYA

https://www.auroraeclipseproductions.com/skyquaker

https://www.auroraeclipseproductions.com/news/category/SkyQuaker

Have 3 screenplays in the laboratory and commercials etc to shoot plus having just played Lord Richard Croft (Laura Croft’s dad) in Shadow of the Tombraider game gone world release last year there seems t one a lot of gaming  stuff too get on with in 3D etc.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Stephen Hope Wynne: Yes. I like the idea that he drove ice-cream vans and did otter lives while building his career and totally love that the Dollar Babies initiative was established by Stephen King.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Stephen Hope Wynne: Apart form being signed to WEA Records working with SHAM 69 and Steve Jones of the Sex Pistols, I have led a dual life in the British Army and Royal Navy working as a Detachment Commander of Satellite, Radio and information Systems, serving in High Readiness Reserve Forces to support special units in Counter Terrorist Response Operations and Surface Intelligence processing in the Royal Navy Reserve.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Stephen Hope Wynne: Thank you to Stephen King and everyone who maintains the Dollar Babies initiative.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Stephen Hope Wynne: Thank you David Toms and Team. Keep on working together after the projects and refer one another to other projects. We all need to keep the team spirit going to make a living and maintain levels of inspiration.

 

She played in Robert Anthony Padilla‘s Graduation Afternoon Dollar Baby Film as Holly Hope.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Diane Sargent: My name is Diane Sargent. I am an actress in Los Angeles, CA. In addition to acting, I have a doctorate in Chinese medicine. I had my own practice and also published a successful magazine about acupuncture and Chinese medicine. About 9 years ago I sold my company and have since devoted myself to acting full time along with other creative endeavors including writing a children’s book and writing/producing my own projects. I am originally from South Africa and sailed from Africa to the United States – on a boat that my family built – when I was ten. I moved to San Diego where I worked on my family’s ostrich ranch, entertaining tourists as an ostrich jockey. My unconventional childhood has left me with a great love of travel and adventure. I live in San Diego with my husband, two children and our Devon Rex Cats.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Diane Sargent: I distinctly remember falling in love with the stage at 6 years old when I won a talent show that was being held at a beach in Durban, South Africa. I remember my parents clapping and laughing when I won.  If I went to therapy, I am sure that they would say something about the validation I felt from my parents approval. LOL

SKSM: How did you become involved in Graduation Afternoon Dollar Baby film?

Diane Sargent: The director, Robert Anthony Padilla contacted me about the role. We had never worked together but were familiar with each other through mutual friends in the San Diego, California acting community. I play an affluent and over-protective parent in Graduation Afternoon – it’s a role that I am very well suited for.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Diane Sargent: Of all of Stephen King’s shorts, it does an amazing job of showing how trivial our everyday problems are in the big scheme of things. While there are no monsters or demons, the idea behind Graduation Afternoon is the stuff of nightmares – that everything we hold dear can go in an instant.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Diane Sargent: I sent in a tape because even if the director knows your work, it is important for everyone involved in casting to see how you will create the character. When you commit to a project, you want to make sure that you are all on the same page in terms of the role.

SKSM: You worked with Robert Anthony Padilla on this film, how was that?

Diane Sargent: I really hope to work with Rob Anthony again. He has vision and knows exactly what he wants. He also has patience and the ability to communicate his ideas to the cast and crew. It makes things go so much smoother. There have been times when I’ve been on a set and it’s been so hectic… he and the team operate in this smooth way that just kept everybody calm.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Diane Sargent: There is one scene where I smack my son’s friend on the butt as he passes by. It wasn’t originally in the script, but Rob Anthony liked it and I had to smack this poor kid on the butt over and over again for multiple takes.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Diane Sargent: One of the best things about film making is the lasting friendships that you make. I keep in contact with everyone. Noor and I even take an acting class together. Jade has started a successful podcast that I always listen to. I have especially loved getting to know the writer of Graduation Afternoon, Marie Jones.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Diane Sargent: It is a very busy time for me right now. In Los Angeles it is pilot season and I’ve been out for a lot of new shows that are being filmed and tested for new series. I have 3 films that are currently doing the film festival circuit. Two that I acted in and one that I directed. I just won Best Actress at the World Music and Independent Film Festival and Best Acting Duo in the Los Angeles Independent Shorts Film Festival. This weekend I have another screening at the Idlewild Film Festival. Next month I begin shooting a web series where I play a producer. In two week I am filming a family friendly movie about a dog where I play the mom. I have some TV roles in the works too that I will hopefully be able to announce soon!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Diane Sargent: I am such a huge fan of Stephen King (and his Corgi, aka ‘the thing of evil’). I spend a lot of time in my car. Most of which is spent listening to Stephen King books. I just finished The Institute and before that, The Talisman. It’s come to the point where I’m running out of Stephen King books! I’m going to have to start rereading my favorites. I also just finished watching The Outsider on HBO. They did an amazing job of bringing that book to life! So, so good.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Diane Sargent: I am an avid journaler. I have kept a journal since I was 9 years old and I have kept every one of them.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Diane Sargent: I started acting professionally when I was 36 years old. Whatever fires you up, do it! It is never too late.

 

He played in Seth Friedman’s All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby Film as Motel Clerk.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

George Long: My name is George Long I am a 20 year old sophomore theatre and performance student at Emerson College.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

George Long: I always had a passion for acting but it wasn’t until middle school when I started acting in plays and musicals that I realized I wanted to do acting as a career.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film?

George Long: Well Seth Friedman, who directed the film, went to school with me and we have worked on films before so he just approached me and asked if I’d be willing to act in the film.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

George Long: I think people are attracted to it by how well it’s written, as well as how it makes us appreciate the small details in everyday life.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

George Long: The part was written for me.

SKSM: You worked with Seth Friedman on this film, how was that?

George Long: It was fun. I had known Seth for a few years at the time and we were, and still are friends, so it made the whole experience a lot more fun as I knew what to expect going into it.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

George Long: I remember on the first day of filming a bunch of us were late because the clocks had been set back, but no one had thought about it so instead of arriving on set at 8 we all ended up there around 9.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

George Long: I still talk to Seth and Robert, who did the sound for the film, as they were my friends in middle and high school.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

George Long: Recently I acted in a film called The Spectacular Smack-man. It’s not finished yet, however I am excited for it to come out as what’s been done so far looks great, and I had a great time on set.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

George Long: I love Stephen Kings work. I think he is great at writing dark and scary stories, and I also love seeing how they get adapted to film.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

George Long: Well besides acting I also did set design on the film, and I’ve done it on a few other projects as well.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

George Long: Just that I would recommend following your passions no matter what.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

George Long: If you liked this film please check out other  Dollar Baby Movies. They all are unique and interesting and showcase some talented people.

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