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Title: Rest stop (?) Bandera de Austria
Runtime: ?
Director: Alexander Bruckner
Script: ?
Cast: ?
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Updates Date
Principal photography is scheduled for summer / fall 2019 so we have not casted yet. I am currently in talks with an author who will do the Adaption to screenplay. More info about the crew will be incoming these next couple of weeks. November 19; 2018

Title: Rainy Season (?) Bandera de Austria
Runtime: ?
Director: Patrick Haischberger
Script: Patrick Haischberger
Cast: ?
Trailer
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Updates Date
The actors will be announced in December November 19; 2018

 

He is the man behind Tussesntop Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jan van Gorkum: My name is Jan van Gorkum and I’m a filmmaker from the Netherlands. In 2010, I graduated as a filmmaker from the Utrecht Academy of the Arts (HKU).  Since then, I’ve written and directed several short films and I’ve also worked as an editor and assistant editor on films and tv-shows.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Jan van Gorkum: From a very young age. I’ve always loved movies and made short films with friends as a kid. So it’s something I’ve always wanted to become.

SKSM: When did you make Tussenstop? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Jan van Gorkum: I started working on Tussenstop around the second half of 2010 and the movie was finished in June 2011. So it took almost a year of work. Most of the work was organizing everything. The film was made very low-budget, so I had to find a lot of sponsors and crewmembers who were willing to work for free. A lot of equipment was sponsored, from camera equipment to locations. Getting all of that in place, takes a lot of time and work. We shot the film in 4 days, including one night shoot for all of the exterior scenes and highway scenes. All the interior scenes were shot during daytime.

SKSM: How come you picked Rest stop to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Jan van Gorkum: In 2010 I read Just After Sunset, the book of which Rest Stop is a part. I really liked the struggle of the main character, about whether or not he should intervene and help a woman in distress. It’s a very primal story: fight or flight. From a financial point of view as a filmmaker, it’s also one of the more manageable stories that you can turn into a film without a lot of money.

I also tried to make the story a bit of my own, when I was writing the screenplay. So it’s a bit of a loose adaptation. In the original story, I didn’t like the whole thing about the main character having an alter ego, which is something that is not in my film. For me, the story was about someone who struggles a long time before he decides to intervene and then things don’t go as smoothly as he had hoped for. I tried to keep the story a bit more basic and grounded in a way.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Jan van Gorkum: I think I discovered it online, on a movie website that published an article about movie adaptations of Stephen King’s work. After I had read Rest Stop, I checked the website of Stephen King and saw the list with short stories of which the rights were available. Rest Stop was one of the available stories and then I decided to buy the rights and make a Dutch film based on the story.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jan van Gorkum: There’s always something goofy or funny that happens during a film production. One moment that stands out for me, took place during the night shoot. We were driving on a highway for some of the interior car shots. Yorick Zwart, who played the main character John, was driving his own car for real and I was in the back with the director of photography. So we were driving on this old and desolate highway near the Belgium border, and we suddenly noticed it was really dark outside. There were no streetlights, no nothing. It was pitch black. Yorick slowed down the car and we started to talk about what could be wrong. It took a short moment before we all realized that the headlights of the car had stopped working. And we were driving there in the middle of nowhere. Luckily, the high beam lights of the car still worked and we drove to a gas station to buy some new regular car lights. We were there right on time, just before the shop closed.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Jan van Gorkum: Personally, I hope the Dollar Baby policy changes in the future, so that the film can be available online for free. The film had a great festival run in 2011 and 2012, but after that, you can’t really show the film anywhere, apart from film festivals. And to be available online, is very important for short films in the long run. It’s a bit frustrating, because as a filmmaker, you put a lot of time and work in a project and you want the film to be available to a large audience. And it’s an independent film, not a commercial film. So I really hope the policy changes, but that’s out of my hands unfortunately.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Jan van Gorkum: Overall, I have received a lot of positive feedback. People seem to enjoy the film and they like the suspense. But of course, there are also people who don’t like it or that have issues with some parts of it. I think some of the stuff concerning the argument the troubled couple has in the film, is a bit long and gives too much exposition. And the fight scene between the main characters could have been a bit more visceral. Looking back on the film, that are things that I would do differently now. But I’m still happy with the film. Every film you make is a learning experience, and I learned a lot during the making of this film.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Jan van Gorkum: I have no plans for the film at this time. The film had its festival run back in 2011 and 2012, so there aren’t any screenings planned in the near future.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Jan van Gorkum: Yes, I’m a fan of his work. Stephen King is an amazing storyteller and I really enjoy reading his work. I don’t have all of his work, but I do have a lot of books and films. My favorite books are The Dark Tower saga, It and Different Seasons. Some of my favorite adaptations are Stand By Me, directed by Rob Reiner, and The Mist, directed by Frank Darabont.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Jan van Gorkum: Unfortunately, I did not have any personal contact with Stephen King during the making of the film. I did send a copy of the film to his office back in 2011, but sadly haven’t heard anything. I do hope he has seen the film.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Jan van Gorkum: No, I don’t have any plans to make more films based on short stories by Stephen King. It was really fun to make an adaptation, but I enjoy writing my own stories for my films a bit more.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jan van Gorkum: I’m working on my first feature film called The Cleaner, a combination of dark comedy and horror, which is currently in development. Last year the project was presented at Frontières, an international co-production market in Canada, where it received a lot of great buzz. I’m still working on the screenplay for that film.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jan van Gorkum: Maybe that I’m an avid collector of action figures based on films.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jan van Gorkum: You’re welcome. I hope the readers find it interesting.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Jan van Gorkum: Thank you for the interview. And I hope that one day more people get the chance to watch Tussenstop.

A BIG THANKS to Danny Paap for making it possible!!!

 

She played in James Douglas‘ Dollar Baby The Doctor’s Case as Lady Rebecca Hull.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Michelle Lieffertz: Oh my, that’s a big question!  I’m a child of God, a woman, a creator, a daughter, a wife, a mother, a sister, a friend… which can probably all be summed up by saying I’m an Artist (Oh my goodness!  It still thrills me that I get to say that!) – a Story Teller.  Primarily, I am an actor – that is my professional training, and my deepest passion.  But I’ve also fallen into designing costumes, and teaching/coaching acting students in dialects, voice work, scene study etc.  My experience is largely in live theatre – I did my undergrad theatre training in Canada, and then my MFA acting training in the UK, where I lived and worked for 7 years.  I’m privileged enough that I’ve been able to work exclusively in Theatre for over 20 years… WOW that’s exciting to say!  I can hardly believe that!  People say that I’m passionate, and I think that’s true: whatever I’m working on, whether it’s a costume design, or a role, or helping my daughters with their homework (or even making muffins!) I throw myself into the project 110% – I don’t really know how to do less!  This can make things exhausting, but it also gives me a lot of joy for the most part!

Most recently, for the past four years, I’ve been working at my dream job: historical interpretation in Barkerville.  For those who may not know what that means, it’s playing a person who actually lived, within their environment, and interacting with the public .  And in my experience, Interpretation is the deepest, truest form of acting: unlike being in a play, you’re not limited to a set scenario with pre-determined lines.  When you are Interpreting, you have to know the truth of your character and their world so fully that you can authentically ‘be’ that person in any given situation!  And as an Interpretor, you are always always learning – researching, discovering, sharing: I absolutely love it.  People ask what my goal is, what my dream role or show would be… and truthfully, I’m living that now!  It’s amazing!  I’m so INCREDIBLY blessed!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Michelle Lieffertz: Hmm!  That’s an interesting question, actually – I don’t have a specific answer to that!  – (though if you were asking my mother, she’d tell you that by the age of two it was already apparent to the family!)  I was raised in a conservative, traditional family… and so ‘being an actor’ wasn’t really an option for vocation!  I actually tried really hard to become a missionary – that’s what I thought I was meant for! – and kept ending up in theatre-related things;  so then I thought maybe I should become a teacher – that’s still respectable – and then maybe I could teach drama and feed the artistic part of me in that way.  So I started a teacher-training programme, but I only got through one term before I was drawn back to Theatre!

I’d say there are probably two galvanising moments in my career path, looking back: the first was when I was doing my Education degree, and Jeremy Tow had been brought in to direct a show; he asked me to audition, and I turned him down.  This happened no less than 20 times over as many days (not joking!) until finally I agreed, just to get him to stop asking!  – he cast me in a lead role, and after that I left the Education programme and began my actor training.

The second was when I was working at a theatre in Vancouver – which shall remain nameless – and got an audition in New York for a theatre school in England.  I told the AD of the theatre, and he responded by saying ‘Wow – MFA training hey?  You know, every now and then there are these people – they SHINE on stage, you just can’t take your eyes off them!  You, Michelle, are not one of those people.  But if you have to go to England to find that out, good for you.’  Which was crushing at the time, of course!  But it made me realize that I had two options: to listen to other people’s opinions and give up, or to believe in myself and just go for it.  I chose the latter! 🙂

SKSM: How did you become involved in The doctors case Dollar Baby film?

Michelle Lieffertz: Oh that’s a WONDERFUL story!  Background information: during the 2017 year, we were privileged to take our daughters and travel for 10 months.  In March of that year, we were in Belgium.  While there, I was contacted by Stu Cawood, who was the Production Manager for the film, and asked if I would look through the script and give a breakdown of possible costume needs (I design costumes for Mr. Cawood in Barkerville).  I did that… did I mention that I tend to go all-out when doing things?  Ha ha ha!  Instead of a list, which he was expecting, in order to convey what I meant, I kind of put together a preliminary costume design.  James really liked it, and asked if I would be willing to come on board as Costume Designer for the film!  I agreed.  A couple of weeks later as I was working on that, Stu asked if I would give them a list of props and set dec, since that department suddenly had a vacancy.  It was raining a lot in Belgium, so I said ‘sure’.  Next thing I knew, (on April 1, in fact!) James contacted me, asking if I would consider becoming Production Designer for the film… which would mean not only taking on a job I’d never done before, but flying in to Victoria for the shoot dates!!! I actually thought it was an April Fool’s joke at first – when I realized he was serious, I was terrified.  However after I tried to convince them I didn’t have the necessary skills and they STILL wanted me to do it, I talked to my husband – who has always been the biggest supporter of my creative endeavours – and he said ‘go for it!’

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Michelle Lieffertz: Apart from the fact that it is INCREDIBLY artfully and skilfully crafted as a mystery, I think it’s the fact that it’s an Underdog story.  Dr. Watson is the side-kick, the friend, the guy-next-door, the quintessential wind beneath Sherlock Holmes’ wings… the one most of us can connect with.  And in this story, he gets to shine… discovering it’s not what he imagines it would be like, but also gaining a greater understanding of what he is always watching Holmes do.  I think for the reader, that makes it personal: it means it’s possible that each of us may also have our moment! (and the catharsis is perhaps a chance to consider whether we actually WOULD want it after all!)

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Michelle Lieffertz: Well THAT story follows on from the one about how I got involved in the first place!  I told you that I flew in to Victoria for the filming… So on Easter Sunday I arrived, met with James in person, and it was then that I was offered me the role of Lady Rebecca Hull, as the actor originally playing it had become unavailable!  So that was unexpected and very exciting!

SKSM: You worked with James Douglas on this film, how was that?

Michelle Lieffertz: (Smile). James and I have known each other for nearly 20 years!  I’ve worked with him as an actor before, but never as a director… and he’d never worked with me as a designer.  Making a film – especially a first film! – is a high-stress environment: I’d say the fact that we’re possibly even better friends now speaks volumes into our working relationship!  – A wonderful thing about working with James as a Director is that he approaches his actors coming from the perspective of being an actor himself: first of all, he is open to questions and suggestions, and willing to trust his actors to bring their own creative ideas into the process.  Watching the story deepen and grow as fellow cast members brought the truth of their individual characters to the work, and seeing James – and Len Pearl, who was co-directing with James, and also a wonderful influence on set – take that work and use it to weave the story together more deeply, was amazing.  I would say he empowered his actors to dig into the depth and truth of each character’s relationships and situation.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Michelle Lieffertz: Oh SO many!!!  How do I choose?  – lots of them require a whole bunch of background story, and I already use so many words… okay, I found this hilarious, anyway: I’ve already told you that I was brought on board as Production Designer, and then also cast as Lady Hull… what that meant in practical terms is that as an actor, I needed to be in costume on set… and Lady Hull’s world is 1889.  HOWEVER, as the Production Designer, I also needed to be on set to oversee all of the Production elements.  So, many of the shoot days, I was in full corset, bustle, skirts, etc… and pulling furniture into the position I wanted it to be, digging through boxes of costume pieces to outfit a surprise extra, that kind of thing.  It must have looked absolutely hysterical to see this Victorian woman bustling all over everywhere, ordering people about, etc!  And we were shooting at a Victorian castle/mansion, so in a way, I felt like the Lady of the House!!!

Another humourous moment was with Michael Coleman, who played the young Dr. Watson: we were doing a last-minute costume fitting, and I was quick-stitching the waistband of his trousers to hold it in place so that I could secure it properly later.  And I accidentally sewed it to his unders!!! He was literally sewn into his costume!

The other humerous-in-a-shake-your-head-sort-of-way moment for me was in the 2nd week of shooting: we were probably sleeping a maximum of 2-3 hours a night, because we could only film in the castle between 5.00 pm & 3.00 am, using the daytime to plan and prep for that evening’s filming.  It was early afternoon, I was on my phone, in a car, being driven from one location to another, phone between my chin & shoulder; I hadn’t had time to eat at all yet.  I had a notebook on my lap, pen in one hand, and in the other was a big block of cheese, which I was knawing on between bits of conversation with the Production Manager – not even sliced or anything, just teeth marks like a rat might make!  And I remember looking at the cheese and thinking ‘THIS is what it’s like to make a film?!????’

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Michelle Lieffertz: Absolutely I do!  Most of the Production Team/Crew members – plus many of the cast -are, or have become, close friends.  The intensity of working on a project like this bonds people, I think: we HAD to depend on each other totally… like one of those exercises where you fall backwards towards a group of people and trust their hands will catch you before you crash on the ground.  We held each other up and held each other together making this film.  That sort of thing makes you family.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Michelle Lieffertz: I’ve just finished my fourth season in Barkerville, working as an Historical Interpreter; I’m in the process of a costume design for a short film project in the New Year, as well as in discussions about a stage role next winter!  But I’m also focusing on my family: my daughters are 15 and won’t be at home forever; and my mother has Alzheimer’s, so I spend as much time with her as I can.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Michelle Lieffertz: (I feel ashamed to answer this question!… but I am becoming one!  I had actually never read a Stephen King story before working on this film: it took me three tries to get through the opening credits of Finding Nemo, so intense and potentially scary stories have never been my go-to!)

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Michelle Lieffertz: Hmmmm…. I spent some time working with La Confraternidad Carcelaria in a prison in Colombia: I was privileged to work with the inmates to put together a presentation on Justice, and the Justice Minister at the time was an audience member!  (that’s where I learned Spanish, and fell in love with the language, the culture, the people!)  That often surprises people.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Michelle Lieffertz: Oh my!  Now I’m supposed to come up with something profound and inspiring, aren’t I?   Oh dear.  – Thank you, first of all, for taking the time to read this!  (I’m sure I’ve talked FAR too much: this is why they give me lines – then they can control how much I say!!). Being part of The Doctor’s Case Movie is truly a ‘more-than-the-sum-of-its-parts’ project: I am both humbled and honoured to be part of this team… and I hope that everyone who reads this is also given the opportunity to be part of something that feeds their passion! – a friend-of-my-heart from this film, who encouraged me to do what I’d never done before, told me ‘if you hang around with me for long enough, I’ll brainwash you into believing in yourself and knowing you can do anything’… may you all have a friend who does exactly that for you!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Michelle Lieffertz: I’m so glad to have met you, Oscar!  Thank you for asking such insightful questions, and giving me a chance to share my experiences!  It has been such a delight!  I hope someone delights you today too!

He is the composer of Walter Perez‘s Into The Night Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Noah Andrade: My name is Noah Andrade, and I’m a musician, sound designer, foley artist, and general audio engineer. I was born in raised in Venice, California to a family that is focused on the arts and culture. They had a very open attitude towards just about everything, and their passions generally shaped and scultpted my own world views that eventually led to my love of music and sound.

SKSM: How did you become involved with ‘Into the Night‘?

Noah Andrade: Ha! My dad actually stars in the film, and he introduced me to Walter. I had sketched a song for him based only on a quick read of the script, and he really enjoyed it. We both hit it off with our love for horror films, and the inspirations we both draw on from working on the material. He contacted me later and asked me to compose the score for him, and I immediately said yes.

SKSM: How did you get started as a composer and what do you do on production?

Noah Andrade: I’ve been interested in music and sound for as long as I can remember. My dad bought a Realistic synthesizer (a Moog brand that was re-branded by Radio Shack), and I would jam with him as a very young kid while he played guitar. I didn’t know much about music, but I knew how to find the right notes. It was kind of engraved in me from there, and the rest is history. For Into the Night, I am, of course, the composer of the score for the film, and am very excited to be a part of it.

SKSM: How did you get started to wrote the original music for ‘Into the Night‘?

Noah Andrade: Knowing this was a Stephen King adaptation set in the 70’s, I tapped into my natural love for Wendy Carlos’ score for “The Shining”. I drew a lot of inspiration from her opening sequences to the film, and wanted to really capture that sense of deep dread and isolation.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Noah Andrade: The only person I’ve really been in contact with is Walter. We had an informal meet and greet over e-mail with the rest of the crew, and I’ve spoken a little with the mixing engineer.

SKSM: After ‘Into the Night‘ did you write more music? If so what?

Noah Andrade: Oh, but of course! I am always making music, tinkering, and experimenting. When not working professionally under my company REBEL MOTHERSHIP, I am writing experimental music under my UglyZombie moniker… just constantly tinkering away!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Noah Andrade: Just being introduced to Walter and learning we both have a lot of the same inspirations with horror films in general. It really motivated me to tap into my deeper inspirations, which I generally don’t get to do with other productions. This is my first horror film I’ve worked on, and it’s of course always been a dream of mine to do so!

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Noah Andrade: I’m always working on something. I’m collaborting with a few other artists on some experimental electronic releases, working on my own genre oriented library releases, and of course constantly toying with my creative side under my UglyZombie name.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Noah Andrade: Yes, I’ve ready many of his books. However, I’m a huge fan of many landmark adaptations of his work. The Shining is probably the most significant. I highly enjoyed the new IT film, and thought everything about that was on point! Pet Semetary is another favorite of mind, and I’ve always loved the quote: “The soil of a man’s heart is stonier”.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Noah Andrade: I’m not sure. I have a tendency to allow my natural personality subvert expectations, so I hope people are generally surprised by me in general. I really enjoy intense, philosophical discussions. I really like connecting with artistic people and getting into the deeper aspects of their thinking and vision. They may not be entirely rare qualities for people, but I do find I tend to jump into these things faster as a means of cultivating relationships first, rather than warming up to them.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Noah Andrade: I hope you enjoy the finished product! Indpendent works of passion are an important seed, and I think we need to support the vision of independent artists to really get new talent into the pool. I’ve met and worked with a lot of incredible people that I hope to see go really far!

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Noah Andrade: Nope! Thanks a ton for allowing me to be a part of all this, and I can’t wait to see how it all pans out!

Title: Beachworld (?) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: ?
Director: Howard Schellenberg
Script: Howard Schellenberg
Cast: ?
Trailer
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Updates Date
The trailer for my Stephen King Dollar Baby will be out Halloween 2019. November 18; 2018

 

He played in James Douglas‘ Dollar Baby The Doctor’s Case as John Watson.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Michael Coleman: Who am I? Is a great question and a wonderful place to start. I love this questions, because truthfully I still don’t know yet. I am just this guy who loves his wife and two daughters more than anything in the world, loves to tell stories, and loves to share his ability to teach others how to tell stories. I believe that art has two functions in this world, and hopefully it doesn’t sound too vain to refer to my work as art. LOL Art is meant to educate or to entertain and in some rare cases is meant to educate or to entertain and in some rare cases it manages to do both. cases it manages to do both. I believe there are incredible rewards to being a professional actor but it also comes with incredible responsibility. We have an opportunity to represent how our moment in time sees and feels about yesterday, today, and tomorrow. So I guess if I were to summarize who am I and what do I do? I guess I am just this guy is trying to make the world a better place for his wife, his daughters, his friends and family, and for everybody who comes after him through his art.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Michael Coleman: I knew I wanted to be an actor from a very young age. I have always love the opportunity to make people feel something which I will get something with greater depth in there eyes through performance and stories. When I was four or five years old are used to entertain my friends in school with funny voices and role-playing my favorite actors and characters of the day. Maybe the first question you asked was so hard for me because I simply have forgotten to grow up yet? I think one of the more common tests for everybody who is considering a life as a professional actor is as follows— If you can imagine your life where you were doing anything else in the world other than acting you should probably consider doing that, if that causes great pain and all you want to do is be an actor more than anything in the world, then you should make that your path. What’s funny about this career as a post to many others is it you can start at any age. You were never too young and you’re never too old. I really love that about this craft and profession. I also think acting is incredibly therapeutic and its level of self assessment and examination of human behaviour creates an opportunity for us to find a better version of ourselves. So whether you do community theater, Church place, or star a major motion pictures it’s all the same to me.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The doctor’s case Dollar Baby film?

Michael Coleman: I got involved with this particular production after a couple of drinks out of fan convention with a dear friend of mine. He was telling me all about this incredible project he wanted to work on, based on a short story by Stephen King, and when he asked if I’d be interested in participating it took less than have a second to shout yes. James and I were together in a stage production many years ago and I have always been incredibly fond ends in off of both his work and that of his wife. They are storytellers’ storytellers. These are the kind of people that other Artists) want to be associated with, and collaborate with, and make wonderful productions with for all their days. I have been a fan of this project from the second I heard about it and I would’ve been just as big of a fan if I simply got to watch it. To actually be involved in this project is incredibly humbling and one of my favourite experiences of all time.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Michael Coleman: I think one of the things, and I believe there are many, that attract so many people to the stories is that they are a part of our collective childhood. There have been many books, television shows, and movies starring these loveable characters And almost everybody in the world knows some version of these stories. One could argue they are just as popular as a Fairytale we all grew up with and attach to our childhood. I also believe there is something incredibly endearing about the relationship between Holmes and Watson. The innocence of Watson and his ability to bring out the most human version of Holmes that could possibly exist is always a wonderful part of these stories. I also believe Holmes brings out the best in Watson. The dynamic of this relationship is incredibly diverse. Sometimes they appear to be like parent and child, other times like best friends, and other times like soulmates. One of the things JP and I discovered in the early stages of developing our versions of the characters is the strong parallels between Batman and Robin. I think that these characters can mean so many different things to so many different people is part of what makes them so attractive.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Michael Coleman: I was fortunate enough to be offered the role but no it wasn’t written specifically for me either. This is the kind of character iPhone plan for most of my career. The Barney Rubble’s, the best friend, innocent who is paired with someone who is somewhat of an antihero. It is my sincerest hope that this project isn’t a one off and that we all reconnect & tell more stories as these wonderful characters.

SKSM: You worked with James Douglas on this film, how was that?

Michael Coleman: I have always known James to be an incredible and dedicated artist. When I read the first draft of the screenplay, it was brilliant and still surprise me in spite of my knowing what a detailed and skilled artist he is and always will be. His attention to detail is second to none and his ability to truly sculpt a complete story with unique voices and a wonderful thematic premise is a gift to be a part of here.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Michael Coleman: We had countless funny and special moments on set, too many in fact to name. This was one of those unique experiences where I truly loved working with every single person in the casting crew in many of them have become like family.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Michael Coleman: I am still in constant communication with almost everybody from this project and I always smile whenever I see them in one of my message feeds I am still in constant communication with almost everybody from this project and I always smile whenever I see them in one of my message feeds. If someone were to tell me that the only projects I would ever do again for the rest of my career would involve working with these people, and these people alone, I would be a very happy actor.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Michael Coleman: I have several projects in the works right now and I am always excited for what comes tomorrow, proud of what we did yesterday, and trying desperately to smell the roses of today and appreciate living in the now. I wrote, co-directed, and starred in a fun feature film that is currently doing festivals as well. It is called Thirty-Seventeen. It is about a bunch of 37-year-olds to have so much fun at their 20 year reunion that they all decide to go back and do one more months of high school. I really hope people like this project as well as this was another really wonderful experience with an incredibly talented cast and crew. I am also developing an animated series with one of my friends from the television show Once Upon a Time, Sean Maguire, and his cousin based on a book she wrote. We are developing this with Arcana Studios and everyone is excited to see where this project is going. Both Sean and I have young children around the same age and it is incredibly cool to be a part of a project for our kids.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Michael Coleman: I have always been a fan is Stephen King. He’s a master storyteller. His attention to detail and his ability to create suspense at the level he does it’s mind blowing. I am one of the few  people involved in this project that has never worked directly with Mr. King before and I truly hope I have an opportunity to meet him in person someday and talk about stories and storytelling.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Michael Coleman: I want to thank you for your incredible questions, everyone who took the time to read this interview, and everyone who has supported me in my career over these past several decades. I am humbled and honoured to call this my craft and my profession. I sincerely hope everyone enjoys this film as much as we enjoyed making it.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Michael Coleman: I am at @1michaelcoleman on Twitter and I always love an opportunity to chat with anybody who wants to talk about stories were shared interests. Whether I am in the project or not, he will likely find I am always ready to lend an ear and engage with the lovely people to share my passions.

 

He is the man behind Cain Rose Up Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

A.J. Gribble: Hello! Thank you for having me. I’m A.J. Gribble, I am a filmmaker from Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

A.J. Gribble: It would probably have to be when I started going to my Audio Visual/Cinematography class 2 years ago. I’ve always loved movies and I wanted to start learning on how they were made.

SKSM: When did you make Cain rose up? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

A.J. Gribble: I got the rights for it back in February 2018. We started filming Cain Rose Up in the beginning of June and production lasted 3 days. The production went really smoothly. I had to ask my local college to film. I thought they would not let me film because of the story and luckily enough. They actually liked it and let us film.

SKSM: How come you picked Cain rose up to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

A.J. Gribble: Cain Rose Up was a story that I loved reading in Skeleton Crew and to see it available to adapt, I had to! And also, when I got the rights to it. That is when all the school shootings were going on and I thought by changing the story into a modern setting and changing the gender of the main character. It would give the movie a better meaning instead of just the shooting parts of it. The character of Curt is why I like the story so much. Because it’s a short story, Curt really has no meaning and that is what I think is scary about it.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

A.J. Gribble: No, not wild guess! I heard about dollar babies on an article about Stephen King and it mentioned that he let’s filmmakers adapt his short stories for $1 and I really thought that was awesome so I had to start right away!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

A.J. Gribble: The special moment for me when making the movie was the ending. The shooting scene was somewhat emotional to me and knowing how it would turn out in post. It was definitely scary and emotional for me.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

A.J. Gribble: I wish that part would change! I wish I can show the whole world my movie. And yes, I hope it changes in the future, that would be really nice. Hopefully an internet/dvd release soon.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

A.J. Gribble: I haven’t had any reviews yet. It should be released very soon, it’s in the last phases of post-production now.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

A.J. Gribble: Not any festivals specifically. Probably going to start with local festivals and then hopefully send it off to bigger ones soon.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

A.J. Gribble: Yes I am a huge fan! I read and watch his stuff all the time. My favorite from him would have to be The Dark Tower series!

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

A.J. Gribble: No, I haven’t had personal contact with him. And no, I haven’t sent it in to him yet. I hope to really soon.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

A.J. Gribble: As of right now, no. I do not plan on making more Stephen King movies. Maybe in the future, that would be nice. One short story I would do would probably be Beachworld. I have always loved that story and I would only do it once I start getting better in digital fx.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

A.J. Gribble: I have been working on a bunch of other short films with my audio visual class and right now i’m working on a huge halloween project that i’m really excited about!

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

A.J. Gribble: People would be surprised to know that I’m only 17 and I’m accomplishing so much with film already! I actually filmed Cain Rose Up when I was 16.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

A.J. Gribble: To the fans, I really hope you guys can see this one day! Hopefully really soon. Make sure to watch the trailer, check out my production page Gribble Productions, and check out the IMDB page for Cain Rose Up.

 

She played in Kyle Burnett‘s Dollar Baby Big Driver as Tessa Jean.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Kellsie Moore: Hi there! Yes, thank you for this invitation. I am an actress and Mindset Mentor. I am extremely passionate about helping people and myself realize that our external reality is a projection of our internal world. I’m all about empowering people to know that they are co-creator to their life and it is their responsibility to make it what they want. Adopting that new belief system is definitely a huge part of what started my acting career. I am the founder of my company @BeMarvelousYou that teaches these principles. When I’m not acting or building my business, I spend most of my time playing with my puppy @LeoCockapooMoore and traveling the world with my wonderful husband David.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Kellsie Moore: I’ve always loved acting, telling stories, being in plays, doing short films etc. while growing up and secretly I dreamed about actually working as an actress, but it wasn’t until three years ago that I actually took that desire seriously. I wasn’t particularly confident on stage, very boisterous or extremely outgoing or anything, I just simply loved and deeply appreciated the way that any great story can reach into someone’s soul and change how they felt about something. It can change their worldview, change their feelings, connect them, save them, inspire them. So, about three years ago, I was sitting at my desk in the correctional office I used to work in, on a stormy night around 9pm, feeling miserable and sorry for myself and I asked myself what was something that used to make me feel alive. Acting immediately came to mind and I started googling acting work and training in my city.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Big Driver Dollar Baby film?

Kellsie Moore: During that exact google search, I came across Kyle’s audition posting for this Dollar Babies Stephen King production. I thought, “hmmm I am terrified of scary stories but my dad is absolutely obsessed with Stephen King so it must be a good story!” I then purchased  the book, read it and thought about it, talked it over with my husband for about a week and decided to request an audition. At this time I had no formal training, coaches, manager or agents.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Kellsie Moore: I think it’s an incredible story about the will to survive and gaining the strength to overcome her fears and then it is thrilling to see her seek revenge and retribution against her abusers. Not to mention the fact that she looses her mind a bit makes it really fun to play!

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Kellsie Moore: I think Kyle originally picked this script because he had the lead cast already in mind but that fell through so he held auditions and I am SO glad he did! That was my first ever audition as an adult and I really had no idea what I was doing but I felt so incredibly alive walking into that room with sides in my hands ready to scream and cry and bring this character to life.

SKSM: You worked with Kyle Burnett on this film, how was that?

Kellsie Moore: It was wonderful, Kyle is fantastic! He had such a cool vision for what he wanted it to look like and having a passionate director makes it all the more fun. I think this was the first film for all of us so it was a really neat experience to learn as we went and get to work with such a committed group of people.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Kellsie Moore: Haha yes! There were tons of fun moments on set and times we had to stop laughing to start rolling. But something I thought was really funny was that Kyle would keep asking me if I was okay between takes while I was practicing my lines, because I looked so distraught, and I had to tell him that yes I’m fine, I’m just in character!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Kellsie Moore: Yes! Actually Kyle and I just did a stylized photoshoot about two weeks ago. You can check out some of the shots on my instagram @KellsieActor

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Kellsie Moore: I currently have about four commercials circulating either online or on hulu, one short film I’m in called “Mary” is being screened at several film festivals, auditioning frequently and I am actually currently writing my own suspense thriller short film.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Kellsie Moore: I really loved his book “The Eyes of the Dragon” but other than that, they’re all too scary for me! But he’s obviously a phenomenal author and I would love to do another dollar babies production of his work.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Kellsie Moore: I am a kickboxer and self-defense instructor.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Kellsie Moore: Yes absolutely! Thank you for having me. A huge thank you to anyone who took the time to read this, I appreciate you!!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Kellsie Moore: Feel free to connect on instagram and follow @KellsieActor for more updates and adventures!

Title: I am the doorway (2019) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: ?
Director: David Albahae
Script: David Albahae
Cast: Jamie Blond, J.J. Crowne, James Ferrigno, Nicholas Sonara.
Trailer
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