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He is the man behind Tudo Que Voce Ama Lhe Será Arrebatado Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Leonardo Granado: Hi, my name is Leonardo Granado and I am a fillmaker. I studied to became a producer and try to work in TV, but life got in the way and I use to say that I became a filmmaker almost as an accident:  My first job after graduated was as Stagehand in a TV series’s pilot back in 2010. This first experience as a professional was not doing what I wanted, but opened several doors for me : every single person at that project came to add in my life in so many ways, some of them became personal friends and we have been working together since then. Today I can say that I have worked at 4 movies and 21 short movies. As a producer I have worked in 12 of them. And I am proud of each one of them.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Leonardo Granado: Well, my first wish was to became a soup opera producer, because here in Brazil soup operas are very popular, more than our own movies. This happens because it is TV, for free and here in Brazil going to a movie theater is very expansive. But after college I found opportunities to work only at movies and since then I am love for this industry.

SKSM: When did you make Tudo que voce ama lhe será arrebatado? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Leonardo Granado: Since I was a twelve year old kid I have been a fan of Stephen King’s work. I have dozens of books and DVDS. I grew up reading then. At college I remember that I found out about dollar babies and since then the idea of producing a short movie based upon a short story of my favorite author became almost an obsession. So, in 2014 I found the right crew, the right director and did it. Lucas Tomaz Neves is a friend of mine and I invited him to direct. But since he realized that this was such a personal project to me, he asked me to direct it with him. So we directed it together, the same way we wrote the script together. And I have so many good memories about the process: choosing the right actor, rehearse with him, seeing him getting better and better. And the shooting days too, 2 days that will be at my memory forever and ever. It was not such an expensive project, I think it was around $ 1.000,00. We only paid the actors since everyone else was there believing in the project, doing that with love and respect to Stephen King’s story. A bunch of friends, really, some of them crazy enough to be there giving their best along with me. And I do love them for that.

SKSM: How come you picked All that you love will be carried away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Leonardo Granado: Well, since we did not have much money to work with, I knew I could not work with one of the horror stories. I was afraid that if I would try to produce a horror movie with no money it could look like an “student movie in the wrong way”: the wrong color of blood, monsters that would make people laugh, this kind of things. This could happen if had I tried with the wrong person to make it with no money. And I did not know anyone to do that the right way with no money. So I kept my mind open to other stories at the dollar baby list and that was the best thing that happened for this project. Of course, when you talk about Stephen King you automatically think about horror movies, too much blood and monsters, because this is what he is most known for. But the other stories, dramas like “The Green Mile” and “Stand By Me” are as good stories as “It” or “The Stand”. And there was a story that I have never forget it since I read it the first time: All That You Love Will Be Carried Away. A beautiful story about this guy that has a dream: this book he wants to write. But he thinks that nobody would read it. And his life sucks. And he thinks maybe death would be better. Well, this feeling is something I can relate with. Not the death part, but having a dream and doubts about it. Working with movies is really hard here in Brazil, soup operas too if you don’t know the right person. Every single day I have doubts about it. Will I ever gonna make it? And in 2015 this felling was ever worst. Today I am still in the fight, but now with a much great curriculum, thanks to that short movie and others that came along.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Leonardo Granado: Since I am a fan and speak a little English, sometimes I access his official website. I found out about it in there.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Leonardo Granado: Rehearses, this was the best of times. I use to say that actors should be studied, when they die the family should give their brains to science. There were an rehearse when Eduardo Tocha was working at the scene where his character was almost decided to kill himself. The suicide doesn’t happen at the story or the short movie, neither Stephen King neither us wrote that at the script. But in this particularly rehearse the actor pretended to kill himself right in front of us with our fake gun. He “lived” that moment. He died that moment.  This was really intense, I could not believe what my eyes were seeing. Of course there are a lot of funny moments that I could share with you guys, but this one is very special to me. Eduardo really lived this character and that is why he had won 2 awards for this movie so far.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Leonardo Granado: Well, I wish it could be different.  I wish other fans and my family and friends could have access to the movie at any time. But I do understand why it is the way it is, the legal rights and the money it could make at YouTube with the views, etc etc. But I think maybe a good way to change that would be a special place for all the dollar babies at Stephen King’s official home page. At his own channel on Youtube. Of course, he would make it clear that he had no evolvement with the movies and it is not his fault if it is a bad movie (LOL). But by doing this he would share with his fans, all around the world, different visions of his work. And there would be no one harming his copyright. But things are the way things are and I am very grateful that at least I had the chance to do what I did.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Leonardo Granado: We had good impressions of friends and family (they had to say that, right? LoL). But the most important review we had for this job was a Dutch online Magazine that talks only about Stephen King’s work: King Things. It is a magazine made by a local fan club and they also has a dollar baby festival which they invited the movie too. But, the review was important to me because it was from a true fan of the author and at a magazine for true fans. “Constant Readers” as Stephen King calls us. And this review had good things and bad things to say about the movie, but most good things (most of them for the lead actor). They gave us an “8” , a great grade. This was one of the best things this short movie gave it to me, even more then awards.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Leonardo Granado: I did have a private exhibition at a real cool place in São Paulo, only for friends and family. But before that this short movie was at 9 festivals. 2 after this event. I will try to screen it at my home town, but I don’t know if I will find out a really good place to do it.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Leonardo Granado: I am a big fan. My favorite book is “The Stand”, but “It” is almost as good. And, of course “The Dark Tower” is his best story, all the seven books together. At the big screen my favorite works are: “Green Mile”, “The Shawshank Redemption”, “The Mist” (movie) , “IT” ( 2017) , “1408” and of course “The Shinning” (Kubrick).

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Leonardo Granado: No, I didn’t. I wish I did, but there were only some email talk with his office. I sent the short movie to him after it was done, but have I never got any feedback. But I understand he is a very busy man, he writes a lot (thank God for that) and when I sent it to him it was close to a month when he was releasing a new book, so I think it was it.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Leonardo Granado: Yes, I do intend to produce another short movie based on his work. I am working on it, rewriting and waiting for his authorization. It will be based on the short story called “In The Death Room”. I have already sent the dollar to Mr. King.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Leonardo Granado: I am writing a lot, short movies and long ones. I am about to shoot 2 short movies where I will be producer and director. I am also rewriting a script for a long movie. And of course, I am rewriting the dollar baby while I am waiting for Mr. King authorization.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Leonardo Granado: That I am about to be a father. My first kid is about to be born, I have no money in the bank, but I WILL produce 3 more short movies next year, 2 of them as a director. I really love what I do.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Leonardo Granado: Don’t you ever give up on your dreams. No matter how hard it seems to be, if it is your destiny so you will see it coming true. And believe me, when it happens it will be the best of times.

SKSM: Would you like to add something?

Leonardo Granado: No, nothing more than a “thank you for the interview”. I hope my English was not so hard to make any sense LOL.

 

He played in Marcello Trigo’s Dollar Baby Zornit as Régis Porto.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Carlinhos Duarte: My name is Carlos Eduardo de Castro Duarte Filho. I have 47. I spent 12 years working in Hotels of International Networks standard 5 stars, where I divulged the City of Recife, inside Brazil and Abroad.

With the crisis of the tourism, I went to study Radio and later Theater, because since from child I participated of pieces in the college.

I help my brother working with the representing the commercial area of ​​a company. I maintain my vocation by studying Theater and Cinema in courses. I am also a volunteer at the Catholic friary Frei Damião, here in Recife, where I work as a theater teacher twice a week.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Zornit Dollar Baby film?

Carlinhos Duarte: I always liked Theater. Then I started to make TV commercials through a casting agency and I liked the audiovisual. I started looking for casting tests at the university cinema and I liked the atmosphere.

I made a selection for the short film “Uma Volta Comigo”, directed by Larissa Reis. Marcello Trigo was the casting coach at the time. But I did not pass. However, in that selection, Marcello knew at the time that I could take a character in a science fiction film he was planning. It was Zornit.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Carlinhos Duarte: The imaginary world we have created since childhood, talking with toys. In Zornit, does my character create things in his mind, or was the alien really there?

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Carlinhos Duarte: It was as I explained above.

SKSM: You worked with Marcello Trigo on this film, how was that?

Carlinhos Duarte: We formed a kind of family, sharing space in an apartment in the city center of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Everyone was part of this atmosphere. I had the privilege of nominating my companion of scene, Surete Martins, who does my wife. And had also worked with Emília Marques, the actress who plays the android. Everything fit. Less in my head. Sometimes I did not understand the script. Marcello created changes in some lines on the set. But it was all very enriching and fun.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Carlinhos Duarte: In independent cinema, we do as best we can. We created a lot of things on the spot. We had a room with air conditioning, where the actors rested, but in the other rooms of the house the heat was great. This forced me to use feminine absorbent in the armpits.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Carlinhos Duarte: Yes, with Marcello Trigo himself, and also Viucine, as I continue to make other films, Zornit being my main work on the poster, much praised by my colleagues, opening new horizons.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Carlinhos Duarte: In the feature film “Haunted Recife”, with Portela Productions and Viucine.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Carlinhos Duarte: I did not know him, I was not a fan. I’ve never been suspense or terror fan.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Carlinhos Duarte: I wear capillary prosthetic  after I entered the cinema. I have baldness in the middle of the head, in ZORNIT I saw this and I changed.

SKSM: Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Carlinhos Duarte: The cinema has its magic and enchants. The sound, the dubbing, the soundtracks … the actor is enchanted how everything is embedded.

It’s wonderful to see, from the opening to the credits, to realize how many people was needed to put that story together, like a jigsaw puzzle.

Zornit was simplicity, discipline and pascience throughout the filming period, almost a therapy. The director is a partner and also actor himself, he knows and understands the need to change or alter, or accept suggestions from his actors, within the story.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Carlinhos Duarte: Everything in life has its motive, live today intently with if there was no tomorrow.

I dedicate my work to my daughter and my new life.

 

She is the woman behind In The Deathroom Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Ashley Good: My name is Ashley, and I am an independent filmmaker and screenwriter from Victoria, British Columbia (Canada), as well as the Programming Coordinator at a local filmmakers society.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?      

Ashley Good: I decided to become a filmmaker when I realized that if I wanted to have any of my screenplays made, I was going to have to film them myself.

While Victoria’s film industry is growing, the majority of projects being shot here are backed by large American production companies, which won’t accept unsolicited screenplays. So you can’t get an agent, unless you’ve had your work produced, and you can’t get your work produced until you have an agent… It’s a real catch 22.

My first project was a “proof of concept” pilot for a potential series that I wrote. It was incredibly low budget (some of the actors even took turns working as boom ops), but as soon as I said “action” for the first time, I knew that I wanted to focus on filmmaking.

SKSM: When did you make In the Deathroom? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Ashley Good: In the Deathroom was shot over one day in October. It was one of the most straight forward productions that I have worked on, as I had a very clear mental image of how I wanted it to look. It was a tricky to explain my “game show” plans to the rest of the crew, but as soon as one of the leads, Ross Ogilvie (Escobar) said “Like Running Man!” the rest of the crew understood.

The entire production had a budget of less than $500 CAD.

SKSM: How come you picked In the Deathroom to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Ashley Good: I picked In the Deathroom because it of its twisted underlying dark humour. My own projects have all been dark comedies, so I wanted to pick a Dollar Baby that I could hopefully do justice to. Popsy would have been interesting to attempt, but it would have been so out of my comfort zone to direct that I don’t believe I could have been true to the story.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Ashley Good: It was referenced somewhere online. I don’t recall the website.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Ashley Good: Because it was such a low budget movie, and because I will joyfully accept any chance I have to work with fake blood, I actually did all of the make up and special effects myself. Ross Ogilvie (Escobar) and Alex Biddiscome (Fletcher) were kind enough to be my guinea pigs, as I had never worked with liquid latex before.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Ashley Good: It is disappointing that I can’t share the movie publicly, but I knew the terms when I signed up. I’m sure Stephen King and his team have their reasons.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Ashley Good: In the Deathroom hasn’t been screened to anyone outside of the cast and crew yet. We have entered a few non-profit film festivals, but will need to wait for a few more months to see if the film is accepted.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Ashley Good: I am hoping that In the Deathroom will be accepted to local short film festivals around Vancouver Island. My feature, Pity Party, which I finished just before I started In the Deathroom, is eating up my larger film festival budget!

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations.

Ashley Good: Absolutely. My favourite Stephen King story is The Stand. Growing up as a bit of an awkward kid, I spent most of my free time watching horror movies and reading. I still remember getting in trouble in French class because I kept hiding Stephen King novels in my text books and reading them in class instead (Bag of Bones got me detention!).

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Ashley Good: No, Mr. King has not watched the movie yet. Actually, I have the DVD in an envelope next to me at this very moment! As soon as I finish this interview I am going to pop it in the mail.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Ashley Good: If any Hollywood bigshots are reading this and are looking for a director for the eventual The Stand remake, just shoot me an email… I’ll work for free if you let me play with the fake blood!

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Ashley Good: I am currently working on getting Pity Party (my feature) as much press as I can, while waiting to hear back from the film festivals that it has been entered in. I am also working on my next feature length screenplay, which I am planning to film in 2018/2019.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Ashley Good: Most people are surprised to know that I really liked Entourage.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Ashley Good: Thank you for reaching out to me to complete this interview! You have built a really cool website, and I hope that it starts to get attention that it deserves. Maybe Stephen King’s team will tweet about it?

I don’t think that I have fans quite yet, but maybe I’ll make a few with In the Deathroom! The trailer is on Vimeo is anyone is interested. The link is Vimeo.com/ashleygood

SKSM: Would you like to add something?

Ashley Good: Yes, I would like to thank everyone on the In the Deathroom team for making this film possible. I hope that everyone that watches it appreciates their work and that they get the attention that they deserve.

 

He is the man behind Zornit Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Marcello Trigo: My name is Luiz Marcello Trigo, and nowadays I work with advertising here in Brazil. I’m a voice actor. I have a studio and I work to advertising agencies with narration for TV and Radio commercials, cartoon or voice dubbing for technical courses, phone calls and such things. I started my career as an actor in the theater in 1992 and from then on I got involved with scriptwriting, as well as dramaturgy and directing actors. Between 2001 and 2013, I worked with a theater company that is specialized in adapting literature. There I learned in practice how to write for an actor, how to deal with them to direct their work. In 2015 I went to a film school here in the northeast of Brazil, called AESO BARROS MELO, in the city of Recife, in the state of Pernambuco. Zornit is the film that I did to graduate in the film and audiovisual course.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Marcello Trigo: Generally speaking, it was gentlemen like Spielberg and Hitchcock, Then, Rod Serling, Robert Zemeckis, George Lucas, Sam Raimi, you know, the masters of the simple and good stories. I have always wanted to create something that capture the imagination of an audience, as these guys did. In pre-adolescence I had already tried the amateur cinema with these old JVC camera, VHS tape. I had no editing room, so I edited in the camera. And when I had friends around to make home movies, we tried. Later I went to do theater, where I learned the base of the craft, I think. Also I learned to write plays for the stage and scripts on my own, reading authors like Syd Field and Robert McKee.
When I joined film school in 2015, I already had some experience trying to make movies on my own. Zornit is my second job in college and the first one I direct alone there.

SKSM: When did you make Zornit? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Marcello Trigo: My team and I filmed Zornit between the end of October and the beginning of November 2016. The production was a partnership between colleagues in my film class. I also had the help of Viucine, which is a company that produces cartoons and documentaries. I’ve worked with them for a few years as an actor, narrator and voice actor.
They lent me camera and sound-recording equipment, and their respective technicians. For free. We filmed everything in thirteen days in a rented apartment. The rest were all colleagues of my college class. It was a difficult undertaking and we had our own financial resources to count on. Putting together what each person invested, starting with me, of course, but considering the transportation and food that everyone paid out of their own pocket, apartment rent and production details, we spent close to 3000 Reais (which is the equivalent, today’s quotation , to about 920 dollars). But we were happy to do the work, under the conditions. And from that experience, I created my own studio brand, Studio 8. My art director, Rosário Gonçalves, who helped me a lot, also created her, the Fênix Filmes. And today we are engaged in other productions like documentaries and varied videos.

SKSM: How come you picked The ballad of the flexible bullet to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Marcello Trigo: I’ve been a fan of Stephen King since a certain book called “Christine” got me through my teens. King is such a strong influence in many of my tales, and even my non-fiction writing, are inspired in the way he does. Whenever I buy a new book of short stories, I like to read those texts in which he tells us how each story appeared in his mind.
I had, in college, a script-making class, in which the teacher taught adaptation. The goal was for students to film the scripts for the next semester. I really did not have time to read all the tales of the Dollar Babies to choose from, so I went to the one whose title caught my eye. “The Ballad of the Flexible Bullet” was the chosen title. In fact you can see my degree of anxiety: the tale should be the third from top to bottom in the first column of the list. What caught my attention inside the story is being a tale involving a writer. I’m a writer, too.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Marcello Trigo: In 2015, when a college professor told me there was the Dollar Babies project, I almost went crazy. That´s how the movie exists today. But, I remember the day I sent the envelope to Maine. It was an incredible day.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Marcello Trigo: So many, that would not fit in this interview. But I think that recreating the story as an episode of The Twilight Zone was a lot of fun, as well as turning the luck elf Fornit into the alien of  another dimension Zornit. Animating the alien on the set was a funny thing. Or the Android Jehovah’s Witness. The Sparks going out of her head are those birthday sticks that sparks, you know? They behave and sounds like an Impossible Mission fuse. We put two of these fuse sticks inside a mannequin’s head. We put fire on then, to provoque the sparks, and vibrated the head to give an impression that it was a broken robot.
I decided that the monster would be a slug of another dimension because that way the little monster would be an easier puppet to manipulate. It would have been a headache to make an Elven-style Narnia, that the original Fornit should be. This change created all other changes. Like making the movie as if it were a The Twilight Zone episode. The story was converted in a sci-fi movie.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Marcello Trigo: My premiere, here in Brazil, was in a Halloween event, so I can not complain. I’ll make the movie go as far I can and show it to the future investors of my future films. The Dollar Babie movie I choose, was an opportunity to test my work and learn how to make movies.
Work in the cinema is a leap into the unpredictable, but we must always take the first step.
So, each Con Horror developed on the planet, you know… I’m going to show my film to every possible festival I can. Now, that I am in contact with you guys, here on the site, and on the Dollar Babies Facebook page, every film festival organizar out there who asks me for a copy, I will be pleased to provide. I would like to see the films of the other directors here on the site as well, mainly the short stories that have a larger volume of interested directors. The different versions of the same story are a film class about adaptation by itself.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Marcello Trigo: Well, I received very good reviews from people who know that my movie was not made with a lot of money. These people recognize the effort of my team and me. As we say here in Brazil, “we take milk from stone”. We did the best film that we could achieve.
Other people do not like the alien, they criticize him for being artificial. I am aware of all the flaws in my film. In this way, I also know the qualities. I know, for example, that while some purists of college-age cinema think that making a monster movie is a waste of time. I see different. Here in Brazil it is much more difficult to make movies of monsters. So, if we do not start from somewhere … do you understand me?
A long time ago I decided that if one day I could manage films, these would be made to amuse and entertain my audience. My alien was not made with a million dollars, but my audience keeps watching from start to finish to see how it ends. When someone gives me a very hard criticism, I look bad, like any artist, but I will not give up my career because of that.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Marcello Trigo: I will offer my film to all festivals who wish to exhibit it. I am at the disposal of all. Here in Brazil there is the Fantaspoa and CineFantastik, next year. But this is the first time I have to deal with sending a movie to any festival, so I will gradually get to know those who can receive my film. Any tip from you guys is gonna be awesome.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations.

Marcello Trigo: I’m a big fan. The kind of fan who does not always like everything the idol writes, but keeps buying their books from time to time. I’ll never forget the impact I felt when Andy Dufresne escaped from Shawshank jail. First, in the book. Then on the Frank Darabont film. And I want to congratulate the producers of “It”, which exceeded my expectations. This new Pennywise is extraordinary.
For a time, Mr. King has not been getting very good adaptations. Under the Dome and The Mist, and The Dark Tower are not my favorites. Then came “It” and “1922”, these are incredible works. I do not put myself between the good adapters. I’m just a student trying to move on.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Marcello Trigo: When I sent the dollar bill inside the envelope, I wrote a note wishing that the dollar would bring me as much luck as to him. I also thanked the organizers of stephenking.com. But they prefer to be rather conomic in their responses. I imagine that millions of people should every year get in touch, wishing for two or three seconds of Mr. King’s attention. So I did not want to be boring.
I only had contact with the kind Margareth Morehouse, by email. Mrs. Morehouse sent me the Dollar Babies contract to sign and solved all doubts. I have no hope that Mr. King will even see my movie, or that he will give any opinion about.
But I know that my DVD, at this moment, are somewhere in Maine. I do not know if he’s going to like to see his elf turned into an alien. Or the central character, Reg Thorpe, becoming Regis Porto. But as far as I know, my brazilian Regis Porto is the only incarnation of Reg Thorpe so far.
I wonder if he’s going to recognize his book on the bookshelves of the character. The novel is that one, here in Brazil, we call “Novembro de 63”. About Kennedy’s assassination.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Marcello Trigo: I have no plans to make another, because a single Stephen King-based film in the curriculum is already pretty cool. Maybe in the future.
But I believe that my next movie will gonna be encouraged by some cultural laws of my country. We don’t have a strog industry like you have in US. Here we have cultural incentives to make movies, but it requires organizing a detailed project and wishing to pass in one of the incentive laws.
So, on the next, I wish to can make a movie with money. To pay the technicians and actors. My “Zornit” is my business card for the my future investors.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Marcello Trigo: At the moment, I’m working on releasing my movie in every festival I can, so the flame does not go out. I keep my job as announcer and voice actor, and actor. I just star a webseries here in my city, made by independent filmmakers. It’s called “Fãtásticos”. I interpret a horror writer (what a coincidence!) that also deals with the occult. I’m also recording sinister narration for a radio series called “Cursed Secrets”. I’m finishing college, writing the report on Zornit and getting ready to be a father in April.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Marcello Trigo: I think people are always surprised when they know that I am acquiring the roles of actor, director (both theater and film) casting, scripts and plays, voice actor, editor and sound editor. It’s my voice that opens the movie Zornit, and that dubs the actor Carlinhos Duarte in his brazilian version of Rod Serling / Alfred Hitchcock, presenting the film. People tell me “Wow, you’re multitasking!”. But in fact all these activities come from the same source: telling stories. I performed and performed each one of them, in my life, always with the intention of finishing my projects having as much control over them as possible. I do not understand photography, for example, but I know how to ask for a wide angle for my photographer. I do not understand color correction, but I learned to trust in the professional who does.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Marcello Trigo: Here in Brazil, we believe that in the US you have better film schools and more money to make movies. But I do know that even there, not all future directors have a place in the sun. I read that Sam Raimi spent around 30 Thousand Dollars to make the first (and only, and amazing, and classic, and incredible) Evil Dead. Wow! If I had 30 Thousand Dollars to make my Zornit, no one would complain about my alien, you can be sure, and no one on my set would have worked for free. So what I mean is, whether or not having money, whether or not having the best college, do not be intimidated by bad scenarios. Go and do it, no matter how. If Chaplin had access to our cell phones today, he would ask why we do not make movies every day.

SKSM: Would you like to add something?

Marcello Trigo: I want to thank you for the opportunity to be here among so many talented names and I ask all festival organizers who read this interview to get in touch, if they want my film in your country or abroad. Making a Dollar Babie movie was an incredible experience and taught me a lot. My Facebook profile is Marcello Trigo. I would also like to see the films of the other directors and read the book written by Shawn S. Lealos, and I would like to be part of a second edition someday.

 

 

 

Title: Dedication (2017) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 19′
Director: Tyna Ezenma
Script: Tyna Ezenma
Cast: Bryan Keith, Cameo Sherrell, Paula Lauzon, Laura Bollinger, Lawrence August, Raul Bencomo, Darlene Rene.
Trailer
Web imdb Facebook Twitter Crowdfunding

 

He played in Brando Improta’s Dollar Baby Mute as Monette.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Roberto Ormanni: I’m Roberto and I’m one who hasn’t yet found his place in the world: I’m a musician, a composer, a student of Literature and cinemaand when they call me I’m an actor!

SKSM: How did you become involved in Mute Dollar Baby film?

Roberto Ormanni: I often worked with Brando. He knows very well the roles close to my soul. When he proposed to me the Project I was thrilled and accepted at once.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Roberto Ormanni: Maybe the simplicity. It’s a story that could happen to anyone.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Roberto Ormanni: I haven’t a real audition. I think that Brando already had in mind what he was looking for.

SKSM: You worked with Brando Improta on this film, how was that?

Roberto Ormanni: Working on Mute with Brando was very stimulating. He chose to direct the movie with an unusual approch, focusing on the sound of dialogues and enhancing the details of the scenery. He have tried to bring the audience not in front of but inside of the movie.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Roberto Ormanni: Well, the scenes you can see have been shot all night long. We drifted in the car and we had chosen isolated Street, on the edge of Napoli, to have a less pronunced setting. Suddenly, while we recited, we stopped the car and we have looking around: we took a wrong way and we had lost in an unexpected place, a long street, deep in the darkness between two ancient walls. I don’t remember how we found the way back home and still today I can’t tell you where we came!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Roberto Ormanni: Sure! I’m still working with Brando, Fabrizia and Roberta, the dop.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Roberto Ormanni: Today I’m working as actor for the new Brando’s film, as a composer for a theatrical show…and in the meantime I keep doing the musician!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Roberto Ormanni:  Before Mute I had never read anything written by King. But to prepare myeslf for the movie, I started Reading some of his books and now I love it!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Roberto Ormanni: I hate to be a lead role, I love to be a right-hand man!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Roberto Ormanni: Staging and making physical words written by others is, in good and evil, the greatest magic in the world.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Roberto Ormanni: I hope to shot another movie inspired by King!

 

 

 

 


He played in Amy Driver’s Dollar Baby In The Deathroom as Eoghan.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Shane G. Casey: My name is Shane G Casey and I’m from Dublin, Ireland. I’m an actor, musician, singer, music promoter & voice over artist. I love theatre and my most recent credits include lead roles in Chekhov’s ‘The Proposal’ and ‘The Bear’ and also with Shakespeare in the Park Productions of ‘Taming of the Shrew’ where I played Baptista Minola and ‘Measure for Measure – Ireland 1916’ in which I played the roles of ‘Duke Vintentio’.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The deathroom Dollar Baby film?

Shane G. Casey: The Director Amy Driver had seen me in another IADT short film and asked me to take on the role of Eoghan ‘the Interrogator’

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Shane G Casey: Well, I suppose the main attraction is that ‘good guy’ (supposedly) escapes having killed all in his path.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Shane G. Casey: No, Amy Driver felt that I was the right actor to play the role she had written.

SKSM: You worked with Amy Driver on this film, how was that?

Shane G. Casey: Amy was a pleasure to work with, she let the actors have a fairly loose rein and was very open to any suggestions I may have made but was also very cognisant of keeping the story real and truthful.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Shane G. Casey: Well, we were filming the scene on a very cold day in November in a ruined old cow shed in a field in the middle of the country and my hands were numb with the cold. But the funniest thing now in hindsight was when the generator which they were using for power broke down and then the replacement one broke down which meant we had to wait for about 2hrs until they got a third one and by this stage our whole bodies were numb with the cold!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Shane G. Casey: Funnily enough I was shooting another short only last week with Sharon Skerritt and we keep in touch too.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Shane G Casey: Well, I’ve just finished two corporate shoots and a TV commercial last week and I do regular voice over’s for radio commercials. I’m working on a documentary with a writer / director colleague where I’ll be the narrator and executive producer. We hope to have this released in early 2018. Apart from that I’m on the prowl for other roles in features, TV etc.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Shane G. Casey: I suppose I did become a sort of a fan after seeing my first ever Stephen King film ‘The Shining’ with the brilliant Jack Nicholson. Since then I reckon I’ve seen most of his movie adaptations.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Shane G. Casey: I can do a great imitation of TARZAN swinging through the jungle!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Shane G. Casey: I hope for a long busy acting life!!

 

She played in Dave Brock’s Dollar Baby The Woman In The Room as Mother & Grandmother.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Laura K. McKenzie: I am currently a stay at home mom. I have four boys, ages 17, 15, 13 and 11. I live in Morgantown, West Virginia. My husband is a doctor of mechanical engineering. I went to West Virginia University on an acting scholarship. I occasionally do acting projects that interest me as I have time available. Until my children finish high school I plan to be with them as much as possible.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The woman in the room Dollar Baby film?

Laura K. McKenzie: Another actress that I know from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania told me about the audition posting in the WV Film website. I decided to read the short story to see if I would be interested. Once I had done some research, and decided I would like to audition I drove to Charleston to participate in the auditions. It was very exciting as this was the first time in a long time I felt on top of my game. It was a wonderful auditioning experience, and fortunately I was given the part.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Laura K. McKenzie: I think that we all struggle with the different realities between life and death. The main character is given the power to choose what is best for his mother, with whom I, as the actress playing his mom, interpreted as having an extremely strong yet unspoken emotional connection, one that surpassed the traditional mother-child relationship. He has to agonize over what would be the best to do for everyone involved as he is now the caretaker. I think there is a fear in all of us as to what we would choose if faced with the same set of circumstances and that conflict is compelling to watch but will also hopefully give us insight as to what another human being would do under those circumstances.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Laura K. McKenzie: I auditioned. It was a wonderful auditioning experience!!

SKSM: You worked with Dave Brock on this film, how was that?

Laura K. McKenzie: I actually think that Dave Brock my be my very favorite director to work with. He is friendly, open, and direct. A very supportive director who does not give idle praise. One of our rehearsals is still in my mind as one of the very best acting experiences I have ever had. I only hope he writes more so that I can work with him again.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Laura K. McKenzie: Well, apparently while we were filming a scene while I was in bed resting I fell asleep for real. I believe they actually caught me snoring on camera.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Laura K. McKenzie: I am Facebook friends with Dave Brock, and we email. I’m also Facebook friends with our make-up artist. We spent a lot of time together. I feel the closest to them- but I would gladly work with any person from that film again. I wish I had had time to get th know Rodger Echols better. I have enjoyed following his filming of a project hecworked on after The Woman in the Room.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Laura K. McKenzie: Well, I’m currently only doing projects I have been asked to do. My four boys are 17, 15, 13, and 11. I’m not ready for my oldest to leave for college.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Laura K. McKenzie: I actually scare very easy, and therefore cannot read much of his work, however I did research on Stephen King the person when I was working on the film and was very excited to find out what a great man he is. I tried twice to get tickets to hear him speak when he went on tour for his last book, but was unable to get tickets. The thought that he will watch The Woman in the Room is thrilling beyond belief.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Laura K. McKenzie: I think people are surprised, and also actually don’t believe me when they find out I only wanted Boy children. We started out just wanting children, and it didn’t matter either way. But with my last pregnancy I actually prayed the baby would be a boy. People find it hard to believe I didn’t want a little girl to dress up and so on. Personally I can dress up, or dress down and I’m good either way- minus high heels, but boys are so very much fun. I love my family.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Laura K. McKenzie: Well, it’s nice to think that people will be reading your article including me. That’s very flattering. I spend a lot of time doing for others, so it’s kind of novel to me.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Laura K. McKenzie: I would just like to add that it was an honor to be asked to be interviewed and I hope I didn’t wait too long to get back to you. Thank you!!

 

He played in Sara Werner‘s Dollar Baby The Things They Left Behind as Ken Hargrave.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Terrance Murphy: Sure, I’d love to, although I always feel a bit uncomfortable talking about myself; my name is Terrance Murphy, and I play the role of Ken in “The Things They Left Behind”. I’m an actor, model, musician, fine artist, and writer. I moved to NYC shortly after filming to attend Acting Conservatory.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The things they left behind Dollar Baby film?

Terrance Murphy: Well, I’m a little cloudy on the particulars, but I believe that Cherry (Xinyue) sent me an email about the casting. I had done a short film for her the year before and I guess she remembered me as someone who didn’t screw up too badly.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Terrance Murphy: Its amazing story telling with the backdrop of the 911 tragedy in NYC. Everyone over high school age can remember exactly what they were doing that day and it changed their lives forever. That backdrop immediately creates a commonality for every viewer. Life is about relationships, and Mister King loaded up the story beautifully with three very different love stories.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Terrance Murphy: I auditioned for a smaller role that never made it into the final script. Most times when I audition for films, there is maybe two or three people at the most in the room. I remember walking into the audition room and there were about 15 people waiting! So many faces staring back at me was a little different to say the least! I remember leaving the room not feeling like I did my best, so I was happily surprised when I was contacted to come in for a table read for a different role. I thought to myself, “Does this mean I’m in the film?” I still didn’t know if I had the part after the table read either, and I didn’t ask; it seemed a bit awkward, you know? I kept looking at Duba, trying to read her face, “Yes or no, did I get the part?” I think we had another table read the next week; I felt a bit embarrassed to say anything and thought to myself, “Well, as long as they keep contacting me, that’s good!”

SKSM: You worked with Sara Werner on this film, how was that?

Terrance Murphy: Sara is wonderful! She is not only one of the sweetest person you could ever know, but a smart, sensitive and generous director. She is so caring with each of the actors to explore and delve into the characters we were portraying. At least that is what I saw and experienced first hand. I always felt like I was in a safe place, and for an actor, that’s golden.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Terrance Murphy: There were some moments that were already talked about in other interviews that were given, like when we had to evacuate, so I won’t rehash those. I do remember a funny (and maybe a little scary?) moment after we finished filming. Duba had a wrap party at her house for the cast and crew. She lives right on Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. It was a beautiful evening, the sun was setting over the bay and after a lot of food and drinks, some of us decided it would be a good idea to go in the water. A few jumped in and a few others took some of the family paddle boards out. I think I was the only one who actually ever used one before (haha). There was a pretty strong current that night, and not long after getting into the water, we all ended up quite a few yards downstream, laughing and goofing around. The current started getting stronger and it was getting difficult to swim back so I started ferrying the ones back that didn’t have any boards. I probably made three trips and I think we eventually all did get back, but come to think of it, I never actually did a head count. I’m just an actor; I think that job falls under the PA’s jurisdiction.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Terrance Murphy: Since I moved to New York City, I don’t see the people from Miami as much anymore. I am a social media stalker though. I keep up with a lot of the others and click “like” or “❤” so they know I’m still stalking them. I live vicariously through their successes. I did get to see Duba, Sara, Jonathon, Maria, Missy and Michael again at the Shreikfest NY Horror Film Festival when it played here in NYC where it won another “Best Short Film” award! It was fantastic to see them again and under such wonderful circumstances!

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Terrance Murphy: Currently, I’m turning a screenplay I wrote called “Prophet” into a novel. We shot a 20 minute short film from it, and it won “Best Short Film” at the International New York Film Festival last winter. I’ll be releasing it for rent or sale in the next few weeks hopefully. It’s a suspense thriller; I’m attracted to these kinds of stories. I’m also going on casting’s, working away.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Terrance Murphy: Yeah, I’m a big fan. When I was young, I read every Alfred Hitchcock story, watched the Twilight Zone and Outer Limits, so I’m drawn to Stephen King’s work naturally. I had a lot of vivid nightmares as a kid, and actually still do. I just don’t go running into my parents bedroom screaming anymore…

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Terrance Murphy: One thing? Hmmmm… I can clap with one hand and yes, it looks as weird as it sounds.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Terrance Murphy: Sure, no problem, it’s truly been my pleasure!

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Terrance Murphy: I want to say thank you to all of you who have seen the film or who want to see it, and have supported the film and continue to do so. You are the reason we do what we do, and you give us the passion and love to tell these stories. We as actors are changed by the stories we tell, the characters we play; we are changed by the people we meet through these stories, and hopefully, if we get out of the way, you too will be moved by these beautiful stories too.

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