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He played in Landon Kestlinger’s Dollar Baby The Reach as Alden.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Steven McDonald: My name is Steven McDonald. I am an actor living in Edinburgh, Scotland. I do mostly screen acting but also some stage work. I have been a songwriter for 30 years and release albums with my band Einstein’s Wardrobe. I am learning to direct and devise screen and stage plays just now and would also love to write novels in the future.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Steven McDonald: I was used to performing on stage as a musician but was persuaded about 7 years ago by a friend to have a go st musical theatre. I realised quickly that I enjoyed being on stage and after having finished acting in a production of Bugsy Malone, I started auditioning for lead roles and found myself being cast. I decided in 2016 to turn pro and started screen acting in 2017. I was involved in about 25 screen projects last year. The Reach was one of the highlights for me.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The Reach Dollar Baby film?

Steven McDonald: I saw an advert by Landon Kestlinger and immediately contacted him. I am a huge Stephen King fan and already knew the story from Skeleton Crew. I wanted to play the part of Alden as I thought it would suit me. And it was an honour to be involved.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Steven McDonald: A lot of people think Stephen King is all about horror. But that is far from the truth. This is a touching story about relationships between people who care deeply about one another. There is a supernatural element of course which adds Stephen King’s unique signature, however the sentimental journey of the characters for me makes it special.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Steven McDonald: I applied online and sent a CV with links to my previous work and some headshots and stills from other film projects.

SKSM: You worked with Landon Kestlinger on this film, how was that?

Steven McDonald: He was great. A pleasure working with him. He is a talented and driven director and I loved the script for The Reach. I felt it facilitated very well the transition from book to screen. The last lines get me every time emotionally.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Steven McDonald: Some really special moments, mostly because I was working with great people. The cast and crew were lovely to work with. I knew Carrie already so the fact we were playing family friends felt pretty natural. And it was the first time I had worked with Freda but the scenes together were really enjoyable. I hope I can work with both actors and crew again.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Steven McDonald: Yes. I keep in touch with Carrie, Freda and Landon.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Steven McDonald: I have some screen projects coming up, including two short independent films, a feature film called Trigger Happy and a couple of episodes of a comedy series called Sons of Spielberg. I still like to do some stage work so I have a play called Lilies I will be working on with a Polish theatre group called The Mirror of Stage. The version I will be doing is in English and is based on Polish folklore. I am also going to be playing live gigs over the summer with my band Einstein’s Wardrobe.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Steven McDonald: Yes. Huge fan. I usually download his audiobooks as he narrates a lot of them. My favourites are classics like The Stand, It and The Shining but I also love the recent Mr Mercedes trilogy.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Steven McDonald: I am a qualified lawyer. I practiced full time for 20 years before I turned pro as an actor.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Steven McDonald: I really appreciate being asked and if you want to follow what I do or keep in touch I have a Facebook page. See www.tallboyperformingarts.co.uk for updates. I am also found on Instagram under tallboyperformingarts

My band are also on Facebook. See www.einsteinswardrobe.co.uk or you can find us on Apple Music, Spotify etc.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Steven McDonald: Thank you again for asking me to do this. And a huge thanks to Landon for asking me to play Alden. I really appreciate it. And a shout out too to Carrie, Freda and the crew. Hope to see you all soon.

 

 

She played in Stephen Dean‘s Dollar Baby Rest Stop as Ellen.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Grace Thomas: I am actor local to Atlanta. I have lived and travelled abroad but the film industry took a foothold here in Atlanta, Georgia a few years ago and so I returned to take my place in it. I am also a floral assistant, culinary and hiking enthusiast.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Grace Thomas: Hahahahaha. I want to be an actor long before I gave in to the deep desire to do so, probably 15 years ago but I tried to suppress the need and ultimately decided to pursue it professionally. You see, I tried not to be an actor because I do value stability and this is not often an industry that provides monetary or geographical consistency but my heart won. If you were born to do something it is difficult to ignore. Also, film acting is a bit different because the lens strips away all facade and sees into your soul- that can be a scary thing.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Rest Stop Dollar Baby film?

Grace Thomas:I saw a posting on Actor’s Access and submitted an audition, I was fortunate enough to be entrusted with such a rich character as Ellen.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Grace Thomas: We all walk around as multiple versions of ourselves and I loved seeing a duplicitous main character who is an outwardly “put together” woman and has a take charge/ even violent alter ego. The characters all have layers and that is always attractive as it allows and audience to explore the levels of themselves too.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Grace Thomas: Stephen cast a large net and posted on Actors Access and luckily I was granted an audition and brought Ellen to life.

SKSM: You worked with Stephen Dean on this film, how was that?

Grace Thomas: He is a great communicator and very generous as a director. Also, as the writer of the screenplay (as adapted from Stephen King) he was not tied to his vision alone. Stephen invited collaboration and watched out for our well being. He is an actors director so to speak.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Grace Thomas: The night we filmed not much went as planned and it was a very cold night but  we huddled together and made jokes in between scenes to distract ourselves. It fostered a collegial environment in which to work and with very intense scenes like mine one needs to be able to build in a positive and safe space as well.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Grace Thomas: I don’t. Atlanta is a smaller market but it is quite saturated and I can only hope to work with some of these folks in the future.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Grace Thomas: I get a good bit of commercial work and so that has been a blessing, as well as, preparing for an experimental production of a play called Constellations with a beautiful ensemble of actors in Atlanta, GA.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Grace Thomas: Yes I am a fan. Although, I must admit that it has been at least 10 years since I have read one of his novels.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Grace Thomas: I am an only, a middle, and and oldest child- I know that can be a bit confusing. I am quite positive that each of those rolls has helped to shape me uniquely.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Grace Thomas: The pleasure was mine. Thank you for your support and time spent reading my thoughts. Please support small film productions in your local areas and never ever convince yourself that you are too old to chase your dreams. I believe that you only live one and since you can fail at something you don’t like doing, you might as well spend your life chasing what you love. Be brave and live boldly.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Grace Thomas: No sir, thank you so much for the opportunity.

He is the man behind The Reach Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Landon Kestlinger: I’m Landon Kestlinger, the writer, director, and editor for The Reach. I am currently a student at Elon University in North Carolina. I am studying Television and Cinema Arts & History.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Landon Kestlinger: Compared to many other people I was kind of late. I realized Freshman year of College. I never had a film program in High School and really didn’t film growing up. I always liked watching the behind the scenes of films and going to see movies. I guess I always wanted to do something with film, but it didn’t hit me until College.

SKSM: When did you make The Reach? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Landon Kestlinger: The Reach was made in November of 2017, but it wasn’t completed until January 2018. The film was made for around $200 and it took 2 days to shoot. The total time for the two days was around 10 hrs in total. We shot all in the Stella house scenes one day and the lake scene the next. Overall there was three people of the crew including myself and it was a small but experience crew. We made this fast but still took the time for getting things set up and working out problems that came along the way.

SKSM: How come you picked The Reach to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Landon Kestlinger: It wasn’t scary or a horror, to me it was romantic and soothing. Something about your loved ones watching over you had a calming effect. After reading the short story I felt that this was the one to make into a short film. I filmed it while studying abroad in Scotland so I thought with the looks of the highlands and Loch Lomond the scenery would work extremely well.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Landon Kestlinger: One of my professors mentioned it in a class, so I googled it and found out about the Dollar Babies. I keep telling other students at my school about it so hopefully there are more films being made, it’s a great opportunity.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Landon Kestlinger: When I made this I knew no one is Scotland; no producers, actor, etc. I worked with the student television station [GUST] over at the University of Glasgow, which helped a lot. The think the craziest story is that my original lead actress ghosted us the day before production, I still haven’t heard from her. Luckily, thanks to my other actors, they managed to find Freda and she was filming less then 24hr later. I think the best easter egg in the film is the lake that we end up at is Loch Lomond and we sang the Loch Lomond song for Stella’s transition between life and death, thats just a fun tidbit.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Landon Kestlinger: There are ways for fans to see these films in places like festivals. Mine just showed at the Cannes Film Festival Short Film Corner so some King fans could see it there. I have also submitted to other festivals where Kings fan might be able to catch it. Sometimes I wish that I could release it online, but I think that the process and experience of working with a name such as Stephen King is exciting enough. Hopefully in the future there will be more outlets, maybe paying $2 for internet rights.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Landon Kestlinger: The good reviews that I have received is that it tells a story in the simplest form as well as shows potential for future endeavors of mine. The biggest criticism is the lighting and more character development. I wish I had more time and help creating the film, but overall I liked what came out.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Landon Kestlinger: Like I mentioned before It was just screened last week at Cannes Film Festival Short Film Corner, I have submitted to other festivals, but still have not Heard back yet.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Landon Kestlinger: I like Stand by Me, The Shining, and Carrie. My favorite story is It, I don’t know why I like It so much but it’s my favorite of his works.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Landon Kestlinger: I did not have any contact with Mr. King and I don’t think he’s seen it. I would love to know how I can get him to watch it because I know it’s not the best but I would love to hear his input and how to make it better.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Landon Kestlinger: I would like to, but I don’t know which one. I would just have to start Reading more of his stories and find one that calls for me like that of The Reach. Defiantly would love the opportunity to do another one of his stories.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Landon Kestlinger: I am currently working on my BFA thesis film. I am in pre production on it so I can’t say much about it, sorry. What I can say is that it is a new look into the traditional sleepaway camp film.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Landon Kestlinger: I’m not ordinary, I never played baseball and soccer. I snowboard and play the drums and had a interesting time growing up.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Landon Kestlinger: No problem this has been fun. I would like to tell those who are reading this article and thinking that their dreams of becoming a director, writer, producer, etc. are too far away, that its not. Anything is possible you just have to work hard. Yes, things might not go right all the time, but you get through it and the experience helps you grow as a filmmaker. Go out there and make something.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Landon Kestlinger: I don’t think I have much else to say except thanks you for letting me talk about my film The Reach. I hope I gave you all some insight into the process of how it was made and I can’t wait to start making the next film. Thanks again.

 

 

He played in Peter Szabo’s Dollar Baby Love Never Dies as Steve.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Reese Eveneshen: Sure thing! I’m Reese Eveneshen… I played Steve in Love Never Dies. Which was my first and only starring role! I also produced and co-edited, Love Never Dies as well. I’m also primarily a Writer and Director as well!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Reese Eveneshen: Truthfully it’s not something I had any interest in… and still don’t! Maybe when I was younger and didn’t quite understand the film industry. But my interest has definitely always been behind the scenes. I’ll give myself a cameo here and there, but that’s about the extent to which I want to pursue an acting career. I have lots of friends who are actors and who are busting their butts doing it, I have a lot of respect for what they do, but it’s not for me.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Love Never Dies Dollar Baby film?

Reese Eveneshen: Originally I came on board as a producer on the film. Peter and I had already been working together for a few years by that point. He produced my project and in turn I wanted to help out and produce his. I was there to help facilitate the production, how we were going to pull it off, how we were going to spend accordingly. It was a very low budget short, and we had a lot to pull off in a short amount of time. I had been working on many smaller productions at the same time and new how to better spend what little we had.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Reese Eveneshen: I think it’s that primal thing in people, folks are attracted to the dark side… especially when they can view it in third person through a film. Stephen King as always tapped into that dark side, it’s very attractive. And I think people like to watch characters who move against the grain and act out their more violent impulses… Everybody has bad days, everybody gets bullied… not many people act on that and do something about it.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Reese Eveneshen: Well we had been going through the usual work load of watching several auditions for the character of Steve. And there were several actors that were very good for the part. But it became clear (based on our schedule) that we needed someone who was going to be available on a rather sporadic schedule. Which can be difficult sometimes with a low budget. At some point I started reading alongside the other actresses who were auditioning for Nona. Peter started looking over at me with this “look” in his eyes… next thing I knew he was asking me if I wanted the part! Based on our schedule and what I was already giving to the production, I said yes. Also I thought it would be a fun challenge, there was a part of me that wanted to give acting a try… In hindsight, if I could go back I would have said “No” and gone with someone else. It was a fun little experiment, but ultimately I feel I didn’t do the part justice and we could have got someone better!

SKSM: You worked with Peter Szabo on this film, how was that?

Reese Eveneshen: Wonderful! As mentioned, Peter and I had (and still have) been working together for years. We’re very close as friends, we’re practically family. We’ve got a great short hand between each other. We worked very well together on this set, both as actor to director and producer to director.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Reese Eveneshen: Oh boy, it’s been years… seven to be exact. I don’t remember much of it. All I mostly remember is how flippin’ cold it was! We shot the movie during a particularly cold April in Ontario, Canada. And it was a lot of very, very cold night shoots. If anything I remember hanging out with fellow cast and crew members, we all got along great and kept each other from freezing to death. On a funnier note, Peter really wanted me to grow a beard for the short… and I really, really tried. I had over a month before production started, and the best I could muster up was a “Wolverine” look. That’s when we learned it was impossible for me to grow a beard! I did enjoy some of the low budget tricks we used: For instance, we had these night time driving scenes, but we wanted to limit our night shoots. We took over a large work shed on a family member’s piece of property and essentially built a black box with heavy cloth. We put the vehicle in the box, ran lights past the windows… and voila! Night time driving sequences. And it worked too… I love that stuff, especially on low budget shoots.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Reese Eveneshen: Of course I do! Mostly Peter and Erin (Nona)… Peter and I still work together to this day. Erin was my girlfriend back then and now she’s my wife… so that worked out well! I’m also still very close to Chris who was our on set sound recordist, he was a groomsmen at my wedding, There’s too many to name, but there’s a lot of people in front of and behind the camera who I’m still close with and continue to work with!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Reese Eveneshen: Well my feature film (that Peter produced) is now out in the world! It’s called, Defective! A sci-fi, action film about a brother and sister trying to escape a police state. We’re very proud of it. This is a shameless plug of course… but please check it out at facebook.com/defectivefuture . Peter and I are currently developing several different projects at this time!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Reese Eveneshen: Since I was a kid. I’ve loved his work. That was certainly one of the draws to working on this project. If I had to pick a favourite, I would pick “The Long Walk”. Great book, and what that I’ve revisited multiple times over the years.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Reese Eveneshen: Plenty I’m sure! Let’s see… Well, I did do the bulk of the make up effects for the Love Never Dies short. I’ve always loved special make up effects and will occasionally dabble in it when I feel so inclined to!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Reese Eveneshen: Thank you! And thanks to the folks that are still watching the short. It was filmed quite sometime ago, and it’s still amazing to me that we’re talking about it today. We weren’t sure if it would find much of an audience, but it’s continued to play overseas for the last few years, which is really cool.

 

He played in Steve Zakman‘s Dollar Baby Autopsy Room Four as Mike.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Sal Catalano: My name is Sal Catalano. I am an actor/writer from Boston presently living in Los Angeles.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Sal Catalano: Living as a musician in Boston in the late 80’s early 90’s I enrolled in a theater class and started doing plays in Boston. I caught the bug. I was a relative shy young man. Music and theater helped me break out of my shell as they say. In 1995 I moved to Los Angeles.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Autopsy Room Four Dollar Baby film?

Sal Catalano: I was cast by Steve Zakman. I co starred in two films he recently produced. “WE Married Margo” and “The Fine Line Between Cute and Creepy”.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Sal Catalano: It is right in line with the usual King creepy tone. The notion of appearing dead yet still being alive still creeps me out. I think the film does a great job in capturing that suspense and morbidity.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Sal Catalano: The part was written with me in mind.

SKSM: You worked with Steve Zakman on this film, how was that?

Sal Catalano: Steve is great and wonderful to work with. We remain good friends.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Sal Catalano: I recall having some good laughs. We always do on these shoots. I was having a good laugh just watching “Flounder” from “Animal House” play dead for hours on end.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Sal Catalano: I also became good friends with Stephen Furst. I was writing a film for National Lampoon. So we had that connection. We remained friends over the years. I was saddened to hear of his passing. I attended the service for him a while back. A sweet man he was. I stay in contact with Steve and our mutual friend Rob Slane a producer on Autopsy.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Sal Catalano: I have just finished a re-write on an independent comedy and beginning a new spec script. I have returned to music briefly. I am staging a benefit concert for people in opioid recovery back home in Massachusetts. It has become a large problem there. Lots of rehearsing. Show is in September on Cape Cod.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Sal Catalano: Yes. Always a big fan. I think “Christine” was the first film I saw in the theater. I used to drive limousines in Boston as a side job. Occasionally, I would drive his kids. I believe I took them to a Red Sox game once. Never met him.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Sal Catalano: I think many are surprised I am also a musician and that I can sing.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Sal Catalano: This is great what you’re doing here. So many King fans including myself. Nice to have a place to share and celebrate his life and work.

He is the man behind One For The Road Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Joseph Horning: My name is Joseph Horning and I am an independent filmmaker from Norristown, Pennsylvania, a small town about twenty miles north of Philadelphia.  I primarily write screenplays and collaborate with other filmmakers on their scripts and productions, however I do occasionally like to jump out from behind the computer and produce my own work.  I’m the owner of Quarterly Entertainment, LLC, and co-owner of CKC Quarterly Productions; a joint venture I run with my business partner Curtis K Case.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of One for the Road or some updates?

Joseph Horning: As of this writing we have one day left for pick up shots.  It’s an odd time to be shooting scenes for a story that’s set in the middle of winter during the spring but there were a lot of things that sprung up during the production and immediately after principal photography that caused some delays.  One thing that set us back in completing the film when we had hoped was a surprise snowstorm on our third day of production.  Because of continuity we had to rework a few things in our schedule and then hope for the best that another storm would come in to help with the scenes.  It was actually kind of perfect at the time because we had just finished all of the interior shots and the snow happened just as we were about to film the exteriors.  Since the story of One for the Road takes place in the middle of winter and during a snowstorm, it was apropos.

As time went on our actors had other commitments so we had to accommodate their schedules.  Also, while in editing I noticed a few things that we needed to go back and rework for the scenes at Tookey’s bar.  So we redid those scenes and then I ended up buying a snow machine to give the illusion on camera that it’s snowing.  All in all, despite the delays, everything is looking great.

SKSM: How come you picked One for the Road to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Joseph Horning: Well for one thing, it’s a sequel to ‘Salem’s Lot, one of my favorite King novels. I loved how that book had a gothic feel to it and that carried over into the short story “One for the Road.”  There’s something about the short story that exudes all of the traits of a great gothic horror tale – the characters are isolated from the rest of the world by being stuck in the middle of a snowstorm; there’s a dark legend that only the local residents believe or know to be true until it’s too late; and of course there are vampires!

I love the original ‘Salem’s Lot mini-series from 1979.  I’ve also seen a number of other Dollar Baby films adapted from “One for the Road,” and always thought it would be a neat spin on the story to make it a connecting sequel to that film.  No other adaption has done that.  So we’re taking our version of One for the Road and placing it within the universe of the Hooper adaption by featuring one or two characters from that mini-series that are still kicking around The Lot after nearly 40 years as vampires.  It will be interesting to see if the fans will pick up on who they are.

SKSM: It is One for the road your debut as a director?

Joseph Horning: No, this is the third short film I’ve worked on as a director and definitely the largest production so far.  My first short film was a psychological thriller I wrote, called Masterpiece, about a desperate woman and eccentric artist. The second film I directed was for a proposed webseries that my friend and assistant director, Gus Garfield, and I developed, called Forest of Darkness.  The pilot episode was called “The Field Across the Way”, and was based off of an old Scandinavian myth about the forerunner of death.

Besides writing and directing my own films, I’ve also collaborated on screenplays with other filmmakers from the Philadelphia area.  I mainly stick to horror, though I’ve co-written two suspense thrillers with my friend Andrey Nikiforov, who is in the middle of directing a feature film based on one of those screenplays.  My business partner Curtis K Case and I wrote the feature length screenplay Where is My Golden Arm, based off of an old traditional jump scare story made famous by Mark Twain.  It’s made the rounds in a few festivals and was a semi-finalist in several of them.  We plan on shooting a short film version next year; once we’re finished with One for the Road, in the hopes that we can attract investors to shoot the feature.

SKSM: You have an incredible cast and crew involved in this project. How did you convince them to play in One for the Road?

Joseph Horning: There really wasn’t anything I had to do to convince them to be in the film.  We held an audition process and a vast majority of the actors who submitted for the film were already fans of Stephen King, or have always wanted to be part of one of his productions.  Many of them actually read the story before coming in to audition for us, and their enthusiasm for the film radiated in their performances.  My lead actress playing Janey Lumley, Sandy Lawler, is a Stephen King fan.  One year for Halloween, she and her twin sister dressed up like the Grady twins from The Shining, complete with blood and an axe!  She just can’t wait to be covered in blood and become a vampire in the un-official Stephen King universe!

I’m extremely happy with the cast we put together for this film and I can’t wait to see all of these characters come to life on screen!

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Joseph Horning: I’ve known about his Dollar Baby films for quite some time.  I first learned about them in the early 2000’s, before heading back to college to study film and video production.  I was kicking around Stephen King’s website trying to get the scoop on anything new that he was working on, when I stumbled across the page listing the stories he had up for purchase.  At the time I knew I wouldn’t have time to find a suitable story to work on and adapt into a film before heading off to school, so I just kept the idea in my back pocket until a later date.  Later turned out to be much later, as I began working on and developing other projects with friends I’ve met along the way, and the thought of the Dollar Babies kept getting pushed off.  So now it’s nearly seventeen years later and I’m finally getting around to fulfilling my dream of making a movie for Stephen King.  In a way I’m glad I waited, because I don’t think I would’ve had the help or resources I have now, had I jumped into it sooner than I did.  The connections and friends I’ve made over the years have become some of my most valuable assets, and I’m grateful to everyone working on this film with me to bring it to life.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there won’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe an internet/dvd release would be possible?

Joseph Horning: It’s a little disheartening knowing that only a select few people will get the chance to view the film upon completion, but that’s just the way the dice roll.  Hopefully our film will be well received by Stephen King and he’ll grant us permission to debut it to a wider audience.  It’s been done before with other Dollar Baby films. As of right now, only the cast, crew and crowdfunding backers will get the chance to view the film in a private screening/link that will be available online with a private pass code.

SKSM: I guess it’s very soon to asking this question but… where the premiere will be? Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Joseph Horning: Well since we’re getting close to wrapping up production, my executive producers Chris Wagler, Scott Surochak and I have been discussing where we would like to hold our films’ premiere.  There are three places we have in mind.  The first is the Grand Theater; located in East Greenville, PA, where the majority of One for the Road will be filmed.  It’s a small theater that has been renovated to look like the old movie houses from the 1950’s.  There’s an old organ in front of the screen and balcony seating for a small group of people.

The second location we have discussed is the Colonial Theater in Phoenixville, PA.  Anyone who is a movie buff or fan of old B-rated horror films will recognize the Colonial Theater from the original Steve McQueen version of The Blob!  The film was shot locally back in the 1950’s, and the Colonial Theater was the setting for one of the movies’ iconic scenes, where the Blob attacks thralls of teenager in the theater.  The teenagers proceed to stampede out into the street as the Blob seeps through the vents and doors after them!  Every year the town holds Blobfest, where visitors return to the Colonial Theater to watch old B-rated horror films and re-enact that famous scene!  I think it would be amazing to debut our film during Blobfest or very near it!

Lastly, we’ve discussed a possible showing in Philadelphia, at the Prince Theater, where many films, plays and celebrities have made appearance over the years.  David Lynch; who attended the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia, has returned to the Prince to showcase his movies and discuss his career.  I believe The Sixth Sense, Rocky Balboa and Creed held their premieres there; along with countless other Hollywood films over the last century, so it would be a great venue to debut our film in.

If given the okay by Stephen King to distribute the film to a wide audience, we would love to put it into the Tribeca Film Festival or even Sundance.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Joseph Horning: I’m a huge Stephen King fan!  I wasn’t so much when I was younger.  It took me until my teens to actually get into his work, and the first of his novels that I ever completed was Cujo.  I had attempted to read IT when the mini-series was announced, but I found it too much of a challenge for me; especially since I was only 12 at the time and not into reading like I am now.  A 1,000 plus page book is pretty daunting for someone just discovering an author; an author that would help to shape his ideas and imagination.  It wasn’t until after I watched the mini-series that I fell in love with that book, and I have now read it at least a dozen times!

IT is clearly my favorite novel by King, though I’m not on board with the remake.  The characters felt forced together, while Richie was too vulgar and not like the character in the novel.  I prefer the original mini-series from 1990 with Tim Curry.  Yeah, it’s cheesy at times and the effects aren’t the best, but I find it fits the original story better than the remake.  I also love Misery.  There is nothing wrong with that adaption;  Kathy Bates is phenomenal in that role!  And of course ‘Salem’s Lot!  Again, the original mini-series is my favorite.  I know fans have issues with Reggie Nalder’s performance as Barlow, and they take issue that it doesn’t follow the book closely enough, but I find it to be a worthy adaption.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories in the future? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Joseph Horning: I would love to work on another Stephen King film if given the chance.  There are so many great stories out there that it’s hard to pick just one, but if I had to, I’d say “Bad Little Kid”, out of The Bazaar of Bad Dreams.  I love how this unknown child just randomly appears throughout this man’s life to taunt and torture him, until he is forced to take drastic measures to save the people around him.  The ending actually gave me chills.

SKSM: Are you working on another project besides this one?

Joseph Horning: Not at the moment.  My business partner; Curtis K Case and I recently wrapped up production on the first season of our comedy-drama webseries called Siblings the Series.  The entire first season is available for viewing on our YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/c/ckcquarterlyproductions.  Once things are wrapped up with One for the Road, we’ll be sitting down to hammer out plans for the second season, as well as develop the short film for Where is My Golden Arm.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Joseph Horning: Probably the biggest surprise is that I’m a self-published writer and illustrator of a children’s book called The Christmas Mouse.  I know, the guy who loves horror films and Stephen King wrote a children’s book? I promise that it’s a cute story that teaches a lesson in the end! No one dies…  Or do they?  Dun dun dun!

I’m working on a second children’s book centered on the same mouse in the first story.  It’s written, I just need to find the time to work on the art for the book.

I also dabble in writing film scores from time to time.  So far I’ve written two scores for short projects and have worked on a few solo pieces.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Joseph Horning: Keep pursuing your passion.  There are going to be people out there who criticize and demoralize, but you have to ignore the detractors, and listen to your heart and follow your dreams.  Like the old saying goes “you can’t please everyone, so you gotta please yourself.”  Make art that you can be proud of not matter what the subject or the story is that you’re trying to tell.  And don’t worry if you’re just starting out and don’t have the best of everything.  Some of the best films are made on the smallest budgets, with the cheapest equipment.  It’s all about the passion you put into every shot and every scene that matters.  Except for audio.  NEVER skimp on the audio!!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Joseph Horning: Fans?  I have fans??

SKSM: Would you like to add something?

Joseph Horning: I just wanted to thank you and everyone out there who has helped support this project from the beginning!  Without their contributions – either from crowdfunding donations or the people on my team who have donated their time – I wouldn’t be where I am right now in this stage of development!  You guys rock!  Thank you!

 

He played in Derek Simon’s Dollar Baby A Very Tight Place as Curtis Johnson.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Patrick Riviere: I’ve been in the theatrical sandbox since I was 10 years old and have worn a variety of hats in the industry my entire life. I always say that highlights of my performing career have been singing with Patti LuPone and making Robert DeNiro laugh between takes on the film Being Flynn. But in truth there have been a lot of highlights including starring in the film A Very Tight Place. I have also done a lot of arts administration and was the first Industry/Professional Liaison at NYU Tisch School of the Arts Department of Drama. I’ve had my own theater companies and am also a playwright.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Patrick Riviere: Since I was 9 years old and had the chance to be the villain in a school play about teeth, I played Sir Desmond Decay and I was bit by the bug and never looked back.

SKSM: How did you become involved in A Very Tight Place Dollar Baby film?

Patrick Riviere: I saw a casting notice and submitted myself. Got a call from the director, Derek Simon and had a great audition and he cast me as Curtis.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Patrick Riviere: It’s classic Stephen King. It’s twisted and of course anything that deals with a storyline where someone is trapped in a porto potty is gonna bring some interest.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Patrick Riviere: I auditioned.

SKSM: You worked with Derek Simon on this film, how was that?

Patrick Riviere: This was Derek’s thesis film from NYU and so it meant a lot to him. He put together an incredible team and was very hands on. He knew how he wanted it to look and what it needed to be. I was lucky to work with him. He is also a writer so he had the story at the core of his direction.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Patrick Riviere: There were two. One was working with a trained dog that had to “play dead” as he was supposed to be electrocuted by an electric fence. Each time we would do the scene I’d run and kneel down and start to cry and the dog would lick my face. Now of course he’s supposed to be dead so that took some time to get him to lie still and not react to my tears. The other was, there is a scene where I am completely naked at the shoreline. It was just above freezing and they needed to get the shot at sundown. We did three takes and then I started to shake uncontrollably. They got me back to the home base and radioed that they didn’t know if they had gotten the scene and that it might not make it in the film. I told them my bare butt better made it in somewhere even if it’s when they roll credits. But the scene was kept in the film.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Patrick Riviere: I do have limited contact with Derek from time to time. He is very busy working on the television series Supergirl. I am also connected to some of the other cast and crew on Facebook so keep up with their adventures especially Barbara Ann Davison who played Mrs. Wilson and Christine Sciortino who was our incredible makeup and special effects director.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Patrick Riviere: I am usually trying to get my play scripts out the door and I am also the new General Manager at Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater on Cape Cod, Massachusetts and I also manage programming for Provincetown Community Television. I am hoping since that I am now 50 years old that I’ve grown into type and maybe will get back to acting one day soon.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Patrick Riviere: I always have been a fan of horror in general but have a special place in my heart for Stephen and actually his son who wrote Horns. Gifted family. My favorites are Carrie, The Green Mile, The Stand, Salem’s Lot and It. Although A Very Tight Place ranks up there now!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Patrick Riviere: That I grew up in a very small rural farming community even though my family was not a farming family. I think most people assume I’m from a big city. There were less than 5000 people in my town and we had a graduating class in High School of less than 100.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Patrick Riviere: I hope they have a chance to see this little film and any of the other Baby Dollar projects. They are worth the look and also not a lot of folks have the opportunity to see some of these stories.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Patrick Riviere: Dream big and always be ready to take a detour. Life’s full of them and sometimes the real joy is on the side roads, and of course, you can always get back on the main route if you want to.

Title: Restare (2018) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 10
Director: David Chien
Script: David Chien
Cast: Shannon Mary Dixon, Nicholas Talone, Audrey Looye, Delicia Shattuck, Dwight Huntsman.
Trailer
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He played in Corey Mayne‘s Dollar Baby Willa as Henry.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Nick Szeman: My name is Nick Szeman. I’m an actor based out of Toronto, Canada.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Nick Szeman: Part of me always wanted to be an actor but was too scared to really put myself out there.  After High School, I went to school for Business and never really felt like I belonged.  As I was getting closer to completing the program, I promised myself that as soon as I finished I would give acting a try.  I’ve been acting ever since.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Willa Dollar Baby film?

Nick Szeman: I was lucky enough to be very close with the creative team behind it.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Nick Szeman: It comes from Stephen King.  Safe to say that anything he is a part of is usually really good.  The creative team behind Willa, especially Corey Mayne and Barbara Szeman, took some creative liberties with the script that are very exciting as well.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Nick Szeman: I did not have to audition.  I’m so lucky that Corey and Barbara had me in mind when they were writing this character.

SKSM: You worked with Corey Mayne on this film, how was that?

Nick Szeman: Corey is amazing.  I’ve known him for a long time and he is an incredibly creative person.  Watching him direct and make his vision come alive was a very exciting experience.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Nick Szeman: The film was shot mostly outdoors in the middle of winter in Canada.  Needless to say, it was freezing on set.  Early on, I discovered that the portable restrooms on set were heated.  So I spent most of my free time on set and in between takes on the toilet.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Nick Szeman: I am in contact with a good portion of the cast and crew.  This was quite literally a family project.  Barbara is my sister.  Adrian Jaworski is my brother in law.  Madison Seguin is my girlfriend.  And the majority of the rest of the cast and crew might as well be family because we are all very close.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Nick Szeman: I was in a short film called Solid State that was released online not too long ago.  Another film I was in, Travis Turner, will probably be released in the not too distant future as well.  Apart from that, I’m constantly taking classes and trying to learn as much as I can as an actor.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Nick Szeman: Of course.  He’s such a complex writer.  Everything he does is so different, yet so brilliant.  I’ve always been very interested in time travel and right now I’m obsessed with 11.22.63.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Nick Szeman: I have a degree in Business.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Nick Szeman: Thank you for reading and I hope you found this interesting.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Nick Szeman: The entire team behind Willa is such a passionate and creative group.  They put in countless hours and endless efforts to make this come to fruition.  A mutual love for film and storytelling brought together a group of wonderful people to share a story they all believe in.  I hope you all enjoy the film.

 

Title: Mute (?) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: ?
Director: Rob Darren
Script: Rob Darren
Cast: Rob Marrocco Jr, Ross Alzina, Doc Phineas, Donna Hamblin
Trailer
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