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Title: The man who would not shake hands (2013) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 28′
Director: Brandon Herron
Script: ?
Cast: Bernie Ask, Wayne Degan, Melissa Dickinson, Aldo Hernandez, Tim Hollinsgworth, Sean McCleary, Tony Mills, Matt Milton, Brian Murphy.
Trailer
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He is the man behind Delver Glass Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Matthias Greving: Hi Oscar here is a bit about me:

Matthias Greving, born in 1986, discovered his love for theatre at a young age through his passion for exciting stories. From there his involvement led to super8- films and television productions.
He studied media design and successfully completed training in film and television, going on to produce industry films and commercials. Greving continues to work for „Radio Bremen“ as a project planner and chief lighting technician.
His love for theatre did not fade over the years. As a drama lecturer he directed classic and modern plays with young people, aged 13 to 18, at a secondary school.
In 2009 Matthias Greving and Eike Kasper founded the production company „Kunst Licht TV.“
„Delver Glass“ is his first project in scenic directing, breaking from the theatre and television studio.
„Delver Glass“ is a special horror feature which requires acting skills similar to an intimate live play, thus the theatre experience of the actors was a decisive factor in choosing the cast.

SKSM: When did you make Delver glass? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Matthias Greving: We started pre-production in 2011 and finished in October 2012. It took us 8 days of filming with the whole crew and two more for effects and specials to finally capture all the images we needed. The whole production time is 25 months from idea to the first 35mm film copy. The movie cost nearly 60.000 Euro.

SKSM: How come you picked The reaper’s image to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Matthias Greving: The Reaper’s Image differs a lot from the bunch of stories that were available at the time I found it. I wanted to make a movie that captures its viewers and tears them into another world without displayed violence, screams and so on.
It’s a mixture of horror and mystery and the fact that it has not previously been done as a short film that convinced me.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Matthias Greving: I just read about that by accident looking for information about Frank Darabont.
After several hours of searching the net I found the website and started reading.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Matthias Greving: In the need for a dollar note I wanted to go to a local bank when an old friend of mine gave me a call and we met for breakfast. I told him about the Dollar Baby and the dollar note and he laughed and gave a dollar note to me he received three years ago from a friend who had been to NYC. He had carried it for three years in his purse until that day…

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Matthias Greving: I would love to share the movie but I don’t think this will ever be possible because of the rights. They have been sold a year ago to Mark Pavia who is working on a movie right now.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reference have you received on your film?

Matthias Greving: We have received a lot of good feedback for film and cast. Now we hope to satisfy people around the world with our screenings on film festivals like the “Garden State Film Festival” in April 2013. Hope to meet you there!

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Matthias Greving: Not yet. I hope to hear from him in the next months. During the production I stayed in contact with Margaret Morehouse.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Matthias Greving: I would choose “The man who would not shake hands”. It’s a great story that can be told with atmospheric pictures and only a few !good! actors. I have written a complete adaption. But I don’t know if I will ever make a movie out of it.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Matthias Greving:Try it. Make your own movie and use the chance Stephen King gives to all of us.
And please, if possible shoot on film – It makes nearly everything look more realistic and atmospheric than sterile 4K video pics. And it’s cheaper than ever.

SKSM: Do you have anything you’d like to add?

Matthias Greving: Thanks!

 

He is the man behind The Reaper’s Image Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Kenny Bates: My name is Kenny, my brother (Sammy) and I began film making a few years ago. We started out doing 5-10 minute short films for practice. We founded our own production company: Rotting Corpse Productions. As of right now The Reaper’s Image is our longest film to date (31 minutes).

SKSM: When did you make The reaper’s image? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Kenny Bates: We filmed it in 2012. Overall the production went smoothly. The film’s budget was a meager $300. All of which went into the mirror and catering for the cast/crew. It took approximately 4 months to shoot.

SKSM: How come you picked The reaper’s image to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Kenny Bates: Well, I’ve always been fascinated with the Grim Reaper so it was really cool to do a film based on Stephen King’s interpretation.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Kenny Bates: Our colleague Brandon Holbrook mentioned the idea. So we looked into the details on the site and checked out the available stories. So we were aware when we decided to do the project.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Kenny Bates: There was a pretty funny story. During our 1700’s scene at Waveland Historic site one of our actors Jeremy Fish (The Duke) was in full costume: white wig, pantaloons, etc. On break from filming he got in the black tricked out hummer he drove to the shoot and drove to the gas station down the road blaring rap music. He said people in traffic gave him some really strange looks but none as weird as the clerk at the gas station haha.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Kenny Bates: It’s disappointing but I understand it is part of the contract. I doubt it’ll be changed anytime soon. We made promotional copies of The Reaper’s Image for conventions.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reference have you received on your film?

Kenny Bates: We premiered it March 16th at the Kentucky Theater in Lexington, KY in front of 100 people. Overall, the reaction was more positive than negative.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Kenny Bates: Not yet, we sent out the requested copy to him but haven’t heard anything back yet. Fingers crossed though!

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Kenny Bates: No immediate plans. If we could pick one however, it would probably be Suffer the Children. It’s such a good story and I think we could bring it’s creepiness to life.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Kenny Bates: Thanks for all the support thus far! We’ve got a lot more in the works including a short slasher flick and a T.V. pilot for a comedy.

SKSM: Do you have anything you’d like to add?

Kenny Bates: I would just like to extend thanks for the interview. Also – a shameless plug (or two). Look us up/like us on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/RottingCorpseProductions) and you can find us at www.RottingCorpseProductions.com!

 

He is the man behind Popsy Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

John Lerchen: My name is John Lerchen. I am currently a student at Columbia College Chicago majoring in film directing. I began making films in the 6th grade and fell in love. I typically make drama/fantasy films.

SKSM: When did you make Popsy? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

John Lerchen: I made Popsy the summer of 2012. Pre-production for the short lasted a few months and we only shot for a few days. Post-production for the film took a few months as well. The film was very low budget and I pulled many strings to get locations/props for free.

SKSM: How come you picked Popsy to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

John Lerchen: I enjoyed the suspense that Popsy created. I read through many SK shorts and just found Popsy to be the best fit for me.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

John Lerchen: A friend in Hollywood mentioned to me that King sells the rights to students for a reasonable price.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

John Lerchen: For the ending of the film we had a road shut down. Hundreds of people had to turn around when they reached our roadblock that the town had set up for us. One woman was so angry she decided to call the police. The police showed up and we handed over our letter from the mayor. We were not bothered again.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

John Lerchen: I wish that I could release my film on the Internet to share with others. I however respect Kings wishes and have submitted the film to over 20 festivals instead. A best of Dvd in the future would be awesome.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reference have you received on your film?

John Lerchen: None yet. I have just now sent my film to festivals and critics.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

John Lerchen: I have not sent my Dvd to Mr. King yet. I however plan to sometime soon.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

John Lerchen: I currently do not have another SK movie in the works. I do however think it would be great to adapt The Eyes of the Dragon.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

John Lerchen: Thanks for following me. I appreciate your support now and in the future.

SKSM: Do you have anything you’d like to add?

John Lerchen: No. Thanks for inviting me to do this.

Title: One for the road (2016) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: ?’
Director: Jacob Norlin
Script: Jacob Norlin
Cast: Kelli Culbertson, Rudy Frias, Bill Koruna, Ron Morrison, Zoe Yates.
Trailer
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Title: Here there may be tygers (2013) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 14′
Director: Keir Pearson
Script: Keir Pearson
Cast: Talton Browning, Natalie Pappalardo, Jyles Horton, Maria Mayenzet, Kimberly Stark, Stephen Brewer.
Trailer
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Title: Big driver (2014) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 30′
Director: Ian Wolfley (Read interview)
Script: Ian Wolfley
Cast: Valerie Weak, Bettina Devin, Heidi Wolff, Mikael James
Trailer
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She is the woman behind Beachworld Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Maria Ivanova: I live in St Petersburg, I make animated films, I love theater.

SKSM: When did you make Beachworld? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Maria Ivanova: I’ve completed Beachworld in 2012. I don’t think I can tell how much did it cost, I was just making it along with my other projects, sometimes in my freetime. So, overall, it took me from 8 to 10 months.

SKSM: How come you picked Beachworld to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Maria Ivanova: I liked the sci fi theme, I don’t think I have ever done anything regarding other planets or spaceships, so it was an interesting opportunity, I decided to give it a shot.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Maria Ivanova: Nothing interesting here – I found it on the official site.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Maria Ivanova: My short film doesn’t have any dialogue at all, so it was a bit tricky to include everything that happened in the story. I tried my best. One day I was drawing a part of storyboarding, and I came up with a detail that wasn’t in the story, and I decided – oh well, let it be, lets see, where it will lead me to. And only at the end of the film this very detail helped me to tie everything together.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Maria Ivanova: How does it feel? It’s sad a bit. It’s like an actor without an audience. But of course, I respect the Dollar Baby rules, and I understand, that the fact that we are allowed to adapt stories is already great.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reference have you received on your film?

Maria Ivanova: I didn’t have a chance to show the film to a lot of people, so I don’t have much to say about this question.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Maria Ivanova: No. I didn’t have any contact with King.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Maria Ivanova: These days I focus mostly on making films based on my own stories.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Maria Ivanova: What fans? Do I have fans? 

SKSM: Do you have anything you’d like to add?

Maria Ivanova: Boris Pasternak wrote a really good poem about creation and dedication, and what is important in this process, in russian the poem is called «Быть знаменитым некрасиво» Maybe you could find it, maybe you will read it, and maybe you will like it. (imdb.com)

 

Title: Big driver (2014) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: ?
Director: Kyle Mecca
Script: ?
Cast: Marlo DiCrasto, Jennifer Hooper, Cathy Reade, Jeffrey Coyle
Trailer
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