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He played in Stephen Dean‘s Rest Stop as Douglas Grant.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Alan Levine: My name is Alan Levine. In addition to acting, I am a lawyer by trade. I’ve been happily married to my wife Dawn for 22 years. She’s a lawyer, too! Our son is a freshman in college. He’ll probably be a lawyer. It’s the family curse.

I’m in my seventh year serving on the Board of Education for Marietta City Schools. I play drums and guitar, enjoy barbequing, drinking good beer, watching sports, photography, and working on all manner of creative projects both collaboratively and alone.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Alan Levine: I started acting on stage late in life, after college, when I was a high school science teacher. The thrill of being on stage, inhabiting another persona, and pulling an audience into a story was and remains intoxicating. Though I left acting for several years, it never left me.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Rest stop Dollar Baby film?

Alan Levine: There was an open audition for the part of Douglas Grant. I taped my audition, was offered the role, and that was how I met the director, Stephen Dean, along with the rest of the wonderful cast and crew.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Alan Levine: Okay, so you’ll probably want to not ask me this question because I’ve not seen the movie yet, nor read the short story that it’s based on! But I am looking forward to doing so. All I can say is the obvious – that lots of people like to be scared – but within the safety of a movie theater or in their own home.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Alan Levine: I auditioned.

SKSM: You worked with Stephen dean on this film, how was that?

Alan Levine: Stephen was great to work with. As an actor himself, he has just the right touch giving direction without overdirecting. That way, he gets the performance he wants while allowing the actor to create within the limits of the character’s persona.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Alan Levine: It was just a great day on set. It was cold and snowy in Atlanta the previous day, which is a rarity. So there was the question of, with the icy roads, whether we’d get a full cast and crew in to work. But we did.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Alan Levine: I am friends with a couple of the cast and crew on Facebook and Instagram – Stephen, Ivy Nicholson and Jaymee Vowell, for instance. So, I get to see what they’re up to even though we don’t hang out. Also, a few of us are with the same talent agency – East Coast Talent.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Alan Levine: I just completed a short documentary titled ‘All My Exorcists Live in Texas.’ It explores the weird, unusual intersection of the law and the supernatural. The legal cases are real, involving hauntings, claims of demonic possession and more. Also, the great film company Hammer and actors Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing and Helen Mirren make appearances. It’s can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5a6hzSXAH0&feature=youtu.be

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Alan Levine: Yes. Though I’ve not immersed myself in his work, I have both read and watched The Shining, and read Pet Cemetery. Also, I saw The Shawshank Redemption and Stand by Me. All of the above were enjoyable. He’s an incredible and prolific creator. The Stand is on my list of books to read.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Alan Levine: Years ago, while I was working as a journalist, I spent an entire night alone, locked inside the famous haunted Atlanta restaurant Anthony’s. It was a stunt for Halloween. I survived, but it was very unnerving. Yes, I heard stuff. No, I didn’t see anything. Though I wrote a story about it years ago, I’ve yet to turn the tale into a video. That’s next!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Alan Levine: I hope that you found the movie enjoyable! Though I’ve yet to see it, I’ve heard good things about it.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Alan Levine: Horror, be it literary or cinematic, when done right, can illuminate the human condition. Whether it’s a work by Poe or Hitchcock or King, the masters of horror, in my opinion, may show us where evil lies, even and especially within our own souls, but still direct us to a better way, to reject cruelty and choose the good, the sane.

 

He is the man behind The Woman in the Room Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Romanos Papaioannou: Hello! My name is Romanos Papaioannou. I was born and raised in Athens, Greece and I’m 23 years old.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Romanos Papaioannou: Since i was 8 or 10. I grew up watching films out of my dad’s VHS collection. I saw movies a 6-7 year old probably shouldn’t be watching but it all worked out at the end.

SKSM: When did you make The woman in the room? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Romanos Papaioannou: I shot the film in May of 2017. With about three weeks of pre production, that included location scouting, casting, assembling my crew. I produced the film myself and it cost less than 1000 euros. Shooting took two days. An 8 hour and a 12 hour shift.

SKSM: How come you picked The woman in the room to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Romanos Papaioannou: While reading the story i saw elements of myself in it. Although i haven’t experienced an exact situation as the character in it, i knew who he was and i saw parts of my daily life in him. This endless slumber of inactivity in the face of a life or death situation. In my character’s case is literal while to me it was metaphorical.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Romanos Papaioannou: Google. Years before i made the film or even entered film school i had learned about the existance of Dollar Babies through a google search for a complete list of adapted Stephen King works.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Romanos Papaioannou: I was so stressed out while making it I cannot recall of anything. The post-shooting drink at 4 o’ clock in the morning in the empty streets of Athens was a great closure.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Romanos Papaioannou: I think a dedicated short film festival would be best. Once a year, all the short films based on Dollar Babies. I don’t think they are that many anyway so no reason to make it too competitive. It would be more like a celebration istead of a competition. We have enough of those as it is.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Romanos Papaioannou: After the “premiere” in the International Short Film Festival in Drama (Greece) people came up to me and the general consensus was that the film was an honest effort at such a sensitive subject. A gentleman told me how he enjoyed the positive portrayal of Death in the film, he felt my movie references were there to serve a dramaturgical purpose and not just be nerd references. Now on the other hand, for quite a few people the structure of the film didn’t really work and I believe that stems from the screenplay that I needed to work a lot more. Also people felt there were some amateurisms in the look of the film. I don’t like making excuses, I felt both the positive and the negative reviews were fair.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Romanos Papaioannou: Yes, the film had already a big opening at a great festival here and Greece and a great follow up at the Athens International Film Festival. I have sent the film in a few other festivals via FilmFreeWay and I will continue to do so throughout the year.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Romanos Papaioannou: YES! Huge fan! I have a soft spot for Pet Sematary, this novel really got under my skin although my favorite books of his are IT and The Green Mile with The Long Walk and the Dark Tower series following close by. As for my favourite movies based on his works, Rob Reiner’s Stand by Me and John Carpenter’s Christine.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Romanos Papaioannou: No the closest I got to him was with his associates via email. Actually, I haven’t sent them the film yet which is not something i’m proud of but I will do very very soon.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Romanos Papaioannou: Not in the near future. A drawback of adapting the works of such a famous writer is that most of the questions I had for the film was on how did I get the rights to do it. Stephen King monopolized the conversation a bit. But if Frank Darabont ever becomes tired of Stephen King and wants me to do The Long Walk I would do it in a heartbeat. Haha.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Romanos Papaioannou: I am writing my next two short films while working as a production assistant on other films and commercials.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Romanos Papaioannou: I’m funny at a very annoying level and I like making people I don’t like or know very well extremely uncomfortable.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Romanos Papaioannou: The film will be uploaded to Youtube at some point. I hope you will enjoy it and leave a comment. I would love to know what you thought of it.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Romanos Papaioannou: Thank you so much for this interview. It’s great to know that people care about the dollar babies, actually short films in general.

 

 

Title: Rest stop (2019)
Runtime: ?
Director: Mark Zimmerman
Script: ?
Cast: Hareth Tayem, Sontaan Hopson, Nadim Accari.
Trailer
Web imdb Facebook Twitter

 

He played in Walter Perez‘s Into The Night as Booth.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Adrian De Leon: My Name is Adrian De Leon.

I was born in Hawaii, the 4th of 7 kids, but we left there when I was six months old. My family moved around quite a bit because my father was a Marine. We finally settled in southern California when I was 4-years-old.

When I was younger I wanted to be an actor. I went to Hollywood after graduating high school, but unfortunately thought that it wasn’t for me because of a bad acting class I took. I eventually got into construction and have done custom tile work for over 40 years to pay the bills. (It’s only a temporary job until Hollywood discovers me. Ha ha)

It wasn’t until about 30 years after my initial disillusionment that that I really started pursuing my lifelong acting dream. I was doing stand-up comedy and my comedy teacher recommended improv and acting classes. I happened to have a great acting teacher, and I fell in love with it all over again.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Adrian De Leon: When I was 5-years-old. I used to go to my room and act like I was doing the fight scenes from movies. I acted a bit in elementary and intermediate school, and all throughout high school.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Into The Night Dollar Baby film?

Adrian De Leon: I had worked on a couple of other projects with Walter, and he reached out to me because he liked what I did and felt I was right for this part.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Adrian De Leon: As with any compelling story, the conflict is what drives it. Not just the outer conflict between the young city man and the two older rural men, but also, in the case of my character, I enjoyed playing his inner conflict. He both wants to help because it’s the right thing to do, but he’s even more concerned about his own survival and being killed by the vampires.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Adrian De Leon: I didn’t audition but I must have seemed like the right fit.

SKSM: You worked with Walter Perez on this film, how was that?

Adrian De Leon: I always enjoy working with Walter. He has a great calmness about him. I really appreciate Walter giving me another opportunity to do what I really love.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Adrian De Leon: We ran out of snow in the local mountains, so it may be entertaining to know we shot some of the snow scenes in East Los Angeles in early spring with fake snow. Also the neighbors where we were shooting were partying and wouldn’t keep the noise down. Not quite the mood we were going for in our vampire film.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Adrian De Leon: Yes, but mostly on Facebook. It was a fun crew!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Adrian De Leon: I am working on writing a couple of scripts, and I have a couple of short films I was asked to do but haven’t started shooting yet.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Adrian De Leon: I generally don’t follow the horror or supernatural genres so I’m limited in my exposure to outside his most famous screen adaptations. Although funny enough, one of the scripts I am currently writing happens to be a horror film. Of what I do know of King’s work, including in Into the Night, he is a fantastic storyteller. The storyline lays out the conflict and suspense in a really compelling way.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Adrian De Leon: People are usually surprised to know that I am of Mexican decent. Second and third generation.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Adrian De Leon: I hope the fans enjoy watching the film as much as we did making it. I’m looking forward to seeing it myself.

 

He is the man behind Grey Matter Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Austin T. Hill: Well, I’m a Colorado Native and a lifelong lover of storytelling in all its forms – from screen, music, novels, and radio plays to comic books! I studied Theatre and Film at Metro State University, graduating in 2014. Over the years on our Youtube Channel, SaulsburyStStudios, my filmmaking team and I reached a great fanbase with a web-series entitled “The Great Nerf War” for which we’re wrapping up our fifth and final season! I’m also a lifelong animal lover/advocate and currently work at The Wild Animal Sanctuary! It’s a large acre non-profit sanctuary home to hundreds of rescued large carnivores. I sincerely believe in a passion-driven life, surrounding and filling your days with everything you love.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Austin T. Hill: The exact moment is tough to pinpoint. I’ve always been the kind of person for whom it’s not enough to simply take part in something I truly love, I want to be a part of it. Since I was a teenager, I’ve been making movies with friends on my Dad’s camcorder, basically editing the movies as we went (many of which were in the horror genre)! I’d say Jurassic Park and The Lord of the Rings Trilogy have had the largest, most profound effect on me and my imagination as a filmmaker.

SKSM: When did you make Grey Matter? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Austin T. Hill: Grey Matter’s script was mostly written toward the end of 2017 and filmed in the late Spring/Summer of 2018. As a general rule, when/wherever I film, I prefer to do so with close friends and family. Because of my acting background, I’m incredibly fortunate to be surrounded by wonderfully talented people who all agreed, pretty much immediately, to embark on this adventure. To me, this is a dream cast. The same can be applied to our locations; they were available to us through the generosity and graciousness of those friends and family. Because of this, I was really only paying for logistics like props, equipment, and food, so our budget resided around $1,000.

SKSM: How come you picked Grey Matter to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Austin T. Hill: I love audiobooks. I was in high school listening to Night Shift over ten years ago as my first foray into King’s works, and I loved every minute of it. I remember where I was in the school when I heard a particular line in “Grey Matter” that changed everything; it opened the floodgates. Such a powerful line, which therein set up the entire story – I ended up featuring our delivery in the trailer as well. King is my favorite author, and I consider “Grey Matter” the true beginning of that fandom. The line: “I’m not saying there’s any truth in it, but I am saying that there’s things in the corners of the world that would drive a man insane to look ‘em right in the face.”

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Austin T. Hill: My best friend and writing partner, Sam Nicoletti, first informed me of the Dollar Baby program a few years ago. We filed the idea away, saving it for a later time when we’d be better able to approach such an endeavor. Last year (2017), the idea came up again and we didn’t hesitant to apply!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Austin T. Hill: When it comes to working with adaptations of great work, I’ve read King himself say “Why f**k with genius?” The story is already incredible; it doesn’t need changes from me in the way of its content. However we did make a few of our own purely because of logistics with filming. One change made was substituting a heavy Autumn thunderstorm in place of the Winter blizzard – due to the time left to film and snow predictability. I wanted the storm to land in the final act as Henry, Carl and Bertie, or the “Trio of Terror” as I call them, confront what Richie has become in his apartment. On the night we filmed this scene, no rain, let alone a thunderstorm was in the forecast. I kid-you-not, as we’re filming that very moment, thunder boomed outside so loud we all paused, shocked to hear it! Soon, rain poured and lightning illuminated the street! Definitely a moment where we felt as if we were all exactly where we were supposed to be.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Austin T. Hill: I wanted to do this for that young Austin hearing the story for the first time. The opportunity to film it (non-commercially of course) with permission, was too amazing to pass up. Everyone involved worked so hard going the extra mile to tell this tale – to be part of something special. Of course, I would love to share what we made on a more public scale, but we know we made it and love how we got there.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Austin T. Hill: Pretty positive reactions so far, I’m happy (and relieved) to say! I’ll always find things to tweak and change but once I submitted our copy of the film, that was my threshold to stop editing. I know our cast delivered really terrific performances and our reviews reflect that! I did all the music as well, which especially terrified me because bad/good music can truly change the final product. A huge part of post-production was just writing, performing and applying score. If a piece didn’t fit the scene, then repeat the process. I actually tested some pieces by placing score in the trailer. Fortunately, the music has also been well received! Above all else, I just wanted to do our cast and this story justice.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Austin T. Hill: Not necessarily, but that’s not to say it’s never happening, just not in the plans at the moment.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Austin T. Hill: Huge. My favorite author through and through! My favorite book of all time is IT, which I read annually. I adore the 1990 miniseries, and thought the 2017 re-adaptation was sensational. It’s a grand time to be a King fan!

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Austin T. Hill: Sadly, I did not – but he’s a busy guy! I’m not sure if he’s seen it, but I do know the package landed in Maine, thankfully. If anything, I think he’d find it among the most faithful of the “Grey Matter” adaptations. Along with our movie’s copy, I included a handwritten letter expressing my hope that the love for the story comes through onscreen.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Austin T. Hill: There are talks amongst the team, yes. We had such a blast making this one, we want to apply what we learned during its production and showcase that growth.  Along with “Grey Matter”, my other very favorite short story of his is “One for the Road”. However, that one’s challenges to film, to do it right, would be pretty outstanding. But, time will tell…

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Austin T. Hill: Filmwise, I’m currently in post-production for two Western shorts we filmed over the last couple years for our Youtube channel. Those, and that finale of our series, “The Great Nerf War”! And, of course, I’m always writing!

SKSM: What’s one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Austin T. Hill: Since grade school, I have absolutely loved the Universal Classic Monsters with Creature from the Black Lagoon being my favorite. I’ve always wanted to direct the remake of “Creature” – with all practical effects of course. However, as a kid I’d be extremely opposed to “modern” scary movies as I was too scared! I refused to watch one. Absolutely refused. It wasn’t until a very reluctant family movie night screening of M. Night Shyamalan’s Signs that changed my outlook completely.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Austin T. Hill: Thank you for this wonderful opportunity! I’d encourage those reading this to celebrate what you love. Write your songs, reach out to your heroes, audition for that part, write that book, donate/volunteer for that cause. We only have one life to live, so let’s leave the world a better place than when we arrived!

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Austin T. Hill: Stephen King rules!

 

He played in Walter Perez‘s Into The Night as Tookey.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Russ Andrade: My name is Russ Andrade, I am an artist involved in  acting, painting, music and abstract electronic music composition. Custom furniture manufacturing is my main source of income.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Russ Andrade: About 10 years ago when someone asked if I wanted to make money doing commercials and sent me to a 2 week trial acting class. Never made a commercial but I fell in love with acting.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Into The Night Dollar Baby film?

Russ Andrade: Walter invited me. We acted together on stage in a play called “Picasso’s Women”. I guess he was impressed.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Russ Andrade: Everyone likes a well written scary story in general. I think the setting of a small rural town in the midst of a late night snowstorm adds to the sense of fear and dread in an element of severe adversity.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Russ Andrade: I think Walter just saw me as fitting the part. I did not audition.

SKSM: You worked with Walter Perez on this film, how was that?

Russ Andrade: Good job, Walter. He knew what he wanted out of the entire crew and drew it out of us. Good job, Walter.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Russ Andrade: Well, when we couldn’t find any snow in the middle of winter in Big Bear. What’s up with that, Mother Nature?

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Russ Andrade: Not yet but looking forward to a bust out reunion. Tacos and Patron, maybe?

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Russ Andrade: I am working on a series concept inspired by genealogical research of my surname. Mum’s the word. On my way to Europe 9/23/18 to do some on site visiting and research.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Russ Andrade: Particularly “The Shining”. Coincidentally snowbound.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Russ Andrade: What they don’t know.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Russ Andrade: “Hi!”

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Russ Andrade: “Hi, Mom.”

 

She played in Walter Perez‘s Into The Night as Francie.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Sofia Kaempfe: I’m Sofia Kaempfe. I’m an actress and a student. I also love to watch movies, tell stories, draw and care for animals. I have two younger sisters, a dog named Brodie and three rabbits. I truly love animals.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Sofia Kaempfe: I knew I wanted to be an actress when I was eight years old. I have always been fascinated by movies and television and I love getting into character.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Into The Night Dollar Baby film?

Sofia Kaempfe: I was on set when my manager called me to tell me that I was selected for the role of Francie. I was incredibly excited! I had to hold in my squeals though because I was on a quiet set. That was really hard.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Sofia Kaempfe: I think what attracts people do this story is that mystery of the lost little girl.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Sofia Kaempfe: I audition for the role of Francie.

SKSM: You worked with Walter Perez on this film, how was that?

Sofia Kaempfe: Working with Walter Perez super fun because he is fantastic with kids, has a lot of enthusiasm and is a very nice guy.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Sofia Kaempfe: I loved when Walter jumped on set with me and pretended to be a vampire with me.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Sofia Kaempfe: Walter Perez, Aly Trasher and I all stay connected on Instagram.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Sofia Kaempfe: I just went to the red carpet premier for my last short film Famous Little Girls. I also received a best supporting actress award for my role in that film as Simon de Beauvoir, so it was very exciting!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Sofia Kaempfe: I love scary books and movies, but my mom won’t let me read Steven King’s scary books yet. As soon as she does, It, The Dark Half and Pet Cemetery are at the top of my list!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Sofia Kaempfe: I think people would be surprised to find out that my favorite animal is an alligator lizard. They will eat right out of  your hand and can have live babies.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Sofia Kaempfe: Thank you for taking the time to read this. I know you’ll love the movie!

 

He played in Walter Perez‘s Into The Night as The Master.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

David Phillip Fishman: My name is David Phillip Fishman, and I play the Master in Walter Perez’s Into the Night. I’m a recent graduate from USC’s School of Dramatic Arts, with a BFA in Acting. At the moment, most of my life is taken up with unpacking my boxes from moving out of student housing, but when I’m done with that, I’ll spend most of my time reading and writing screenplays, plays, short stories, anything I can get my hands on.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

David Phillip Fishman: My elementary school did a Christmas play every other year about the life of an Italian composer, Antonio Vivaldi. When I was in third grade, I watched the fifth-grader who played Vivaldi that year and loved his Italian accent, so I spent the next two years perfecting my own Italian accent. I ended up falling in love with the stage and haven’t looked back since!

SKSM: How did you become involved in Into The Night Dollar Baby film?

David Phillip Fishman: I’ve worked with Walter before on a handful of projects, including a comedic webseries with a number of his classmates from CSULA. He invited me to be a part of this project fairly early on.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

David Phillip Fishman: This story links to Salem’s Lot, one of Stephen King’s most famous and popular works, which immediately lends it a lot of background and helps to build the world beyond the short film. My character in particular ties into the whole backstory from Salem’s Lot, which I find fascinating.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

David Phillip Fishman: Walter told me a story about speaking with a co-creator about the role of the Master, and specifically the physical traits they find scary. While his co-creator said she would be more afraid of a bigger, more imposing figure, Walter wanted someone tall and skinny, so the sense of power would come more from the words and actions of the Master rather than simply his figure, and eventually invited me to be a part of the project. Hopefully I live up to those expectations!

SKSM: You worked with Walter Perez on this film, how was that?

David Phillip Fishman: Walter’s a consummate professional. I’ve always enjoyed being on set with him because he works well with actors and treats us well, too. I can’t wait to see what he goes on to do.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

David Phillip Fishman: The special effects makeup took forever, but I think it was definitely worth it. I looked terrifying to me, and I’m quite excited to see how it turns out.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

David Phillip Fishman: We’ve all worked together before, and I’m sure we’ll work together again sometime soon!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

David Phillip Fishman: I’m partially finished with principal photography on my first feature, an indie feature filmed in Los Angeles and Sweden called I Wanted Our Summer, which will be coming out next summer. I also run a YouTube sketch comedy group called Elephant Dept. Season Two is on its way!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

David Phillip Fishman: I’ve been reading his books and short stories since I was quite young. Probably a little younger than I should have been, but the librarians didn’t know that. I’ve always been fascinated with the screen adaptations of many of his famous works, and I’m excited to see how this one turns out!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

David Phillip Fishman: It took me five tries to get all the way through Kubrick’s Shining… But now I love it!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

David Phillip Fishman: I’m excited for all of us to see the final product! Thanks for reading!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

David Phillip Fishman: A huge thank you to Walter and everyone else involved in the short, both cast and crew. I can’t wait to see how it turns out!

 

 

He played in Walter Perez‘s Into The Night as Gerard Lumley.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Evan Carver: My name is Evan Carver and I’m an actor.  I had the good fortune of playing the character Gerard Lumley in “Into the Night.”

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Evan Carver: I knew that I wanted to “be in the movies” ever since I was a little boy.  I reenacted and impersonated everything that I saw.  In my mind, I basically was Indiana Jones.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Into The Night Dollar Baby film?

Evan Carver: I knew Walter from a previous project and he contacted me about “Into the Night” and said something like “Hey man, I have a role for you in a film based on a Stephen King story, we roll camera in two weeks.  You in?”  I was literally sitting in the hospital with a cast on my leg from ankle surgery I had the week before when I got that message from Walter, but it was a no-brainer.  Hell yeah I was in!

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Evan Carver: Well I had never heard of King’s story “One for the Road” before Walter reached out so naturally the first thing that attracted me was that it was Stephen King.  Then I read Walter’s screenplay and loved it.  I loved that it was a period piece, I loved that the stakes were high for Lumley and of course I was intrigued as to how they were going to pull off a blizzard in So Cal in March.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Evan Carver: I did not have to audition for this part, no.  I knew Walter from a previous project that we worked on in 2015.  Fortunately we became friends on set that day and exchanged info.  And the rest is history.

SKSM: You worked with Walter Perez on this film, how was that?

Evan Carver: Working with Walter was great! He’s a talented director as well as a super nice guy. He had such a clear vision for this project and articulated exactly what he wanted, but without inhibiting my creativity.  He gave me a lot of freedom, which was really exciting. Walter’s knowledge of cinema is so vast you could spend hours listening to him talk about films (and I have).

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Evan Carver: My first day on set and everybody’s first day shooting up at Big Bear was…interesting?  I guess we can laugh about it now.  Everybody got lost trying to find the meet-up location.  And cell phone service is almost non-existent on the mountain so everyone’s GPS wasn’t working and you couldn’t call anyone to figure out where you were supposed to be.  I was mortified that I was 2 hours late to set on my first day! So you can imagine my relief when I got there and discovered that everyone was having the same problem and I wasn’t actually the last one to find the location.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Evan Carver: I keep up with some of the cast and crew on social media.  Or the occasional group text with Walter, Russ and Adrian – they’re always good for a laugh.  I had a great time working with and getting to know them.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Evan Carver: I have a few projects coming up this fall.  I’ll be acting in two short films and a web series.  Also, my girlfriend and I are currently developing a short.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Evan Carver: Yeah I am a big fan of Stephen King.  I actually binge read the entire Dark Tower series last year in like two months.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Evan Carver: I taught English in Thailand and lived there for 6 months. And I recently got to re-visit and take care of elephants at a sanctuary there!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Evan Carver: Thanks, Oscar.  If any of you get the chance to see “Into the Night” I hope you enjoy it.  Thanks for reading!

 

She played in Landon Kestlinger’s Dollar Baby The Reach as Annabell.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Iona MacRitchie: Hello, I’m Iona MacRitchie. I’m a student at the University of Glasgow studying Film and Television and Digital Media studies.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Iona MacRitchie: I actually became an actress in the production by complete accident. I was the producer in the short film, but since the part had very few lines I offered to do it! Before ‘The Reach’ I have typically been behind the camera rather than in front of it, but all in all it was a nice change.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The Reach Dollar Baby film?

Iona MacRitchie: I got involved with ‘The Reach’ through Glasgow University Student TV (GUST) where I met Landon (Director) on his semester abroad from the US. Landon had his head straight about a short film he wanted to make, and honestly his drive made me want to throw myself in and get involved.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Iona MacRitchie: Although I may be entirely bias, I think that a Scottish production is always going to draw audiences in. Scotland has the most beautiful scenery which makes filming even more enjoyable. The Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond are an encapsulating view and honestly these scenes were my favourite part of the production and made the film into something special.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Iona MacRitchie: I didn’t have to audition for the part no, It was more of a spontaneous decisión to try out the role.

SKSM: You worked with Landon Kestlinger on this film, how was that?

Iona MacRitchie: Working with Landon was a pleasure. He knew what the want, how he wanted to go about it and let me as the Producer help make that happen.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Iona MacRitchie: Anyone that knows me well knows I don’t cope with the Scottsish weather at all. Despite this Landon has a very clear idea that in one his scenes, my character would appear on by the water in Loch Lomond wearing nothing but a White dress to convey an almost angelic look. Standing in Loch Lomond in the middle of Winter for far too many takes  is definately still something that makes me laugh today.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Iona MacRitchie: Yes, I am still in regular contatct with Andy and occasionally Landon. I would definately get back in contact with the rest of the cast again, they were down-to-earth whilst profesional, a true a joy to work with.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Iona MacRitchie: I am moving to the US to UCSB for a year abroad so I have currently be working on filming my favourite parts of Scotland to make a comedy short film with a comparison to the tropical West Coast lifestyle – but i wont give too much away!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Iona MacRitchie: Oh absolutely. Although I was made by my Mum to watch ‘IT’ at a very young age and i am still absolutely terrified of clowns!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Iona MacRitchie: Oh gosh, this is one of these questions that you wish you were a triplet or had some sort of fourth nipple. I guess that I orginially went to university to study History and Politics then quickly realised that I always wanted to work in the media industry and that’s what I wanted to study.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Iona MacRitchie: Thank you for so much for taking the time to read this interview. Honestly I’d say the one peice of advice is just to get out there, carry you’re camera around with you and be ready to capture something, because sometimes the best content is when you least expect it.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Iona MacRitchie: I would just like to say how proud I am of the team that the film was shown at Cannes Film Festival Short Film Corner. I hope the film brings as much joy to those watching it as it did to help créate it. Feel free to follow me on instragram @iona_macritchie

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