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Title: Willa (¿?) Bandera de Canadá
Runtime: ¿?
Director: Corey Mayne
Script: Barbara Szeman & Corey Mayne
Cast: Adrian Jaworski & Kelsi Mayne
Trailer
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Title: Mr Mercedes (2017)
Runtime: 60′
Creator: David E. Kelley
Cast: Kelly Lynch, Ed Anderson, Rob Niter

He is the man behind My Pretty Pony Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Maciej Barczewski: Hi, I’m a director and producer affiliated with Gdynia Film School in Poland. A lawyer by training, I also teach copyright and media law in Europe and the US.

SKSM: When did you make My pretty pony? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Maciej Barczewski: We shot it in the summer of 2016. The whole shoot lasted almost 10 days. We intended to make it in 7 days, but the frivolous weather rendered that goal impossible. The budget was ultra-low, not more than 15.000 dollars. Yet, thanks to the efforts and combined talents of our whole film crew, one of the professionals who saw the final cut estimated that we had to spend more than 200.000 dollars to achieve such a level of quality. We did not correct him.

SKSM: How come you picked My pretty pony to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Maciej Barczewski: I recall that when I read it for the first time in 1993 in the collection of Nightmares and Dreamscapes I did not enjoy it as much as other stories. As a young reader I was disappointed that there were no supernatural elements, no twist or even a distinct ending to the story. At that time it seemed to be just a long scene of a grandfather talking to his grandson. Many years later, when I thought about making a film with time as a main theme, and I revisited this story it struck me as a deep and multilayered reflection on both the nature of time and family relationships. Then everything just clicked and I knew I had to make my version of ‘My Pretty Pony’. The movie is about time and it took time to grow up to it.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Maciej Barczewski: I heard that Stephen King supports independent filmmakers by allowing for non-exclusive adaptations of some of his stories. That is very gracious and a proof of his love for the art of cinema.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Maciej Barczewski: There were many, as usual. For example, one day me and my DOP Krzysztof almost got electrocuted when we moved a piece of set design. Fortunately, at the end of the day everything turned out fine.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Maciej Barczewski: From the perspective of possible future studio adaptations of these stories it is entirely justified. Yet, I guess that some kind of a limited DVD edition of the best dollar babies would not hurt the commercial potential of their studio reworkings. But it is up to Stephen King to decide about such an endeavor.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Maciej Barczewski: So far the reception has been terrific. Within only a month of a festival circuit our film has been awarded seven times at festivals both in Hollywood and Europe. Reviews say that it’s ‘captivating’ and ‘charming’. A number of times I heard that its cinematography and soundtrack is reminiscent of the early works of Spielberg. One cannot imagine better compliments and all our film crew earned them through their hard work.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Maciej Barczewski: I have received a contract signed by Mr King, but all the arrangements have been made with his kind assistant Margaret. I have recently sent him a copy of the movie, but I guess that at the moment he’s too busy with his professional commitments to provide any feedback.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Maciej Barczewski: Just a few days ago we have wrapped a major feature film I’m co-producing called ‘The Fastest’ (pol. Najlepszy) which will enter screens late autumn, with any luck not only in Poland. It tells a true extraordinary tale of a former drug-addict who becomes a triathlon world champion. I’m also working on a script of a World War II drama I would hope to shoot next year. Apart from the film work I’m putting finishing touches on two books on intellectual property and high technology law. So it’s a busy, busy time.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one stroy to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Maciej Barczewski: Oh well, I would love to. The problem is that almost of all them have been optioned or have been recently made. I always dreamed of plunging into the Dark Tower universe and ‘Wizard and Glass’ is a masterpiece of magical storytelling. It would also be fun to revisit the little town of Salem’s Lot.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Maciej Barczewski: If you have an opportunity to see ‘My Pretty Pony’ at a festival nearby, do not hesitate. You will enjoy it.

Title: One for the road (2018) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: ¿?’
Director: Joshua Brucker
Script: Joshua Brucker
Cast: Lance Henriksen, Don Scribner, Brittany Benjamin, Daniel Bielinski, Matt Roy, Mabel Weissman
Trailer
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He is the man behind Popsy Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what

David Merriman: My name is David Merriman and I own a small company called dmi videos. We do everything from commercials to music videos. I spend as much time as possible writing scripts and working on my own documentary projects and short films.

SKSM: When did you make Popsy? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

David Merriman: I made “Popsy” in oct of 2015. I shot it over 3 days in Birmingham Alabama. A documentary I had made in Alabama had got a lot of press and done quite well at a film festival there, as a result I got a great cast and crew who all worked on the project for free! I edited the film myself and called in some favours on the colour grade and mix so the real world cost was only a couple of thousand.

SKSM: How come you picked Popsy to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

David Merriman: The second film I ever saw in a movie Theater was hammer horrors the brides of Dracula. And I have always loved the original Dracula novel, so it seemed like a really exciting story to try and translate into film. There is some evidence that Stoker based Dracula on an Irish warlord he was related too and not Vlad the impaler. So in Popsy the only line the vampire speaks is in Irish.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

David Merriman: I’m a big Frank Darabont fan and read about how he did the first dollar baby. After researching and finding out King still did this I blew up his site quick fast.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

David Merriman: My favourite part of the film is where the vampire materialises in the car next to Sheridan. Sheridan slowly turns and sees the vampire and is terrified. We had a lot of fun doing that shot and multiple takes were lost from laughing. I think we were all giddy with excitement at how cool the vampire looked. Our Sheridan,Jeff Hallman, is also in kings “Cell” with Sam Jackson and John Cusack. He is a super committed person and great to work with.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

David Merriman: I don’t see that. I think the dollar babies are more for aspiring film makers to get their chops on good material and I think it’s a testament to Kings generosity as an artist that he does this.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

David Merriman: The film screened at the sidewalk festival in Birmingham, Alabama and was really well received. We also got a Luke warm review from a king fan site.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

David Merriman: No comment

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

David Merriman: I’m in post production on another vampire short I shot over last few months of 2016 and planning another horror short for end of March as well as commercial work I’m doing.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one stroy to shoot, which one would it be and why?

David Merriman: I’d like to do another short though I’m not sure which one. As a life king king fan it’s tough to pick

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

David Merriman: Thanks Oscar, please send me on a link when it’s done. Cheers, Day

 

Title: The mist (2017)
Runtime: 60′
Creator: Christian Torpe
Cast: Alysssa Sutherland, Gus Birnev, Luke Cosgrove

He is the man behind I Am The Doorway Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Joe Kowalski: My name is Joe Kowalski and I’m an independent filmmaker hailing from Cleveland. I’ve directed four films, about 300 Internet shorts, and countless commercials and promotional materials. I also do a lot of freelance work and co-host a podcast that’s been going on for over 70 episodes.

SKSM: When did you make I am the doorway? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Joe Kowalski: We made it at the end of last year (2016). The production was fairly straightforward. I was working on a film called Prism at the time that we were introducing in a film festival event because it was only half an hour long. We were still looking to fill our allotted time, and it just so happened that my girlfriend at the time had told me about the Dollar Baby Club. We started working on our version of the story that summer and filmed the entire thing at almost no cost in a weekend.

SKSM: How come you picked I am the doorway to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Joe Kowalski: Given that our main budget was going into Prism , we wanted a story that we could adapt at a low-cost and with minimal stress. My girlfriend at the time suggested Doorway because out of all of them it was one of the few that seemed to meet that criteria, especially if we took out the scenes with the characters in outer space. We then added a framing story to fill it out a bit more.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Joe Kowalski: I had heard about it years ago and thought it was an exceptionally cool opportunity. It wasn’t until last year when my ex read about it that I started taking it seriously however. The funniest part about the whole agreement for me is that it had to be paid with a literal dollar bill. It couldn’t be a check, or a PayPal payment, or anything other than a crisp dollar.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Joe Kowalski: Filming the scenes by the beach turned out great visually, but it was in actuality a horribly cold and windy day. This is why I typically try to film my movies in the summer! All the voices in that scene had to be overdubbed later, because there was no way the original audio would have been usable.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Joe Kowalski: It’s unfortunate, because we’re very happy with the final results. Yes, it was cool premiering it at the festival event, but I wish there was a way to display it online, even if it means we had to pay an additional fee. An Internet/DVD release would be fantastic, but currently the contract stipulates that we can only show it privately or at other festivals.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Joe Kowalski: Neither yet outside of the original festival event, although we are submitting it to further festivals. That’s the tricky part about not being able to display it much!

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Joe Kowalski: I did not, but that would be a dream come true if there’s any possibility that he had a chance to view it!

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Joe Kowalski: Currently I’m opening a studio space for freelance work with some friends, continuing work on our podcast, and still putting out new shorts every other week. I have a few other film ideas and other secret projects gelling that I may start working on later this summer.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one stroy to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Joe Kowalski: There’s already so many adaptations of his work, but the man writes so much that there’s still plenty out there. My ex is a much bigger King fan than I am, and introduced me to some of his other works that might be cool to dream about. It might be fun to do an updated, film-length version of The Stand.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Joe Kowalski: Hi!

SKSM: Would you like to add something?

Joe Kowalski: Thank you for taking the time to interview me. It’s been a pleasure!

She is the woman behind My Pretty Lover Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Irina Lord: My name is Irina, I am 23 years old and I was born in Romania. I moved to the UK when I was 19 to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Art at the University of Oxford. I now live in Canada, Vancouver to be more precise where I am working towards my Master’s degree. I am a filmmaker and a visual artist. I think over the years I’ve become a sort of nomad. I have a hard time pinpointing where my home is, since my family is currently spread over 3 continents. I guess I move around a lot and this has influenced my work: my characters are displaced and universal, never tied down in time or space.

SKSM: When did you make My pretty lover? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Irina Lord: I started working on “My pretty lover” in the summer of 2015 and I finished the film in 2016. It took a few months because I made the film with no budget and using only what was available. It was sort of a side project, a fun thing to do with my friend Andra (she’s the actress in it).

SKSM: How come you picked My pretty pony to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Irina Lord: This might be a no-no to say, but I’m actually not a huge Stephen King fan. Out of all the dollar baby stories, I though this one was the most organic – I didn’t really like the big reveal “punch-line” endings most of the other stories carry. I also thought it was a good metaphor for film, as the story is all about time and duration.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Irina Lord: Just to be clear, he is not selling the movie rights. He is giving permission to adapt a few select stories (with many strings attached).  I think I read about it on Indiewire or somewhere similar.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Irina Lord: There was one! I was filming the intro by the train tracks. It had just started snowing and the fields were still green, so I thought that would make a nice shot. Over the tracks there is a farm, quite far off in the distance. Unfortunately the farmers there also have dogs they let roam around and they came running almost as soon as I set up my tripod. I think I only got about 2 minutes of footage before I was chased off by 5 or 6 big hounds…

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Irina Lord: Speaking of strings attached… After finished the film I realized what a big problem not being able to show it was! No budget films rarely make their way into festivals, so showing your film online is usually the only opportunity you have of releasing your work. Of course, with the dollar baby films you can’t do that. I’ve made a trailer for the film, but that’s about it. The film is just sitting on a hard drive somewhere – seems like a waste if you ask me!

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Irina Lord: None so far… I think my friends and family liked it, but you’re the first “outsider” to ask for an interview and express an interest. I had almost forgotten about this film, so thanks for resurrecting it!

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Irina Lord: I’ve had some brief email exchanges with his assistant. I’ve of course asked for feedback when I sent the film, but heard nothing back.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Irina Lord: I’ve just finished a short film in collaboration with two actors, one from South Africa and another from Indonesia. The film is called Silence and it’s a hybrid, pushing the boundaries between fiction and documentary, actor and director. I’m now researching my graduation project, looking into Deleuze’s idea of the fold.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one stroy to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Irina Lord: I don’t think so. There’s no point in making films to keep on a shelf.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Irina Lord: Thanks for the interview! I guess what I could say is, if you want to see “My Pretty Lover” email me and I can send you a copy!

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