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He is the man behind Bike Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

David Toms: I’m from Birmingham, UK. I’ve been writing and directing short films now since 2007 (including several that will never see the light of day again!). I’m currently writing some new projects and I also work in broadcast TV production.

SKSM: When did you make Bike? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

David Toms: Bike was a project that began it’s life in late summer 2011. We were about to start planning our final project at University. Mike Peace & James Colley (both co-producers) mentioned they’d been reading about Frank Darabont and his successes with a Stephen King Dollar Baby film. After an online search we were convinced it was the way to go. Over the next week, we’d picked our story and sent off our application.
We had a modest budget of just over two-thousand pounds, which was all out of our pockets. Due to an exchange trip, we were in China throughout pre-production, this made the planning rather difficult, but everything came together before we got back and began shooting.
After months of pre-production, we began shooting in March 2012. Filming took place around the West Midlands for four days in total – one day on a rural road in Kinver, Staffordshire and then three days in the main character’s apartment in Birmingham.
We were very lucky to have found Stephen Hope-Wynne, who is a very talented passionate actor and brought incredible intensity to the role of Richard (the lead character).
Despite the film being five years old, it didn’t see the light of day for at least three years as I wasn’t overly proud of some of the quality issues. The camera was overexposed in a lot of the road scene, which made large chunks of it unusable and the focus is soft quite a lot. I finally got round to recutting it the year before last and I’m pleased with the result. It might not be perfect but I hope it gets across the essence of what we intended.

SKSM: How come you picked Stationary bike to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

David Toms: I remember being sat on a bus on my way back home when I was reading through the synopses of different short stories that were available. I don’t recall why, but this particular story just jumped out at me. It really was doable in terms of scale and the inability to know what was real and what wasn’t, was a theme I was fascinated to work with.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

David Toms: As mentioned previously, James and Mike (co-producers) had read about it – I believe from an issue of Empire Magazine.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

David Toms: I remember being sat in the car waiting for the actors to arrive on the dark rural road. We were about to shoot the scene where Richard confronts the metabolic work crew. I was nervous as this was biggest project I’d ever directed and it was a challenging shoot. The local council had allowed us to block off a layby to film in, but we needed to do it darkness so we needed to stop for traffic. Thankfully, there wasn’t much traffic at all so we wanted to try something different.
The camera operator Bex suggested we try a chase with the bike and the van, I reluctantly agreed and we tried it. We had Bex sit in the boot of the car, whilst filming Stephen on a bike, in front of the workmen in a van. It was a nightmare to time and risky, but when I looked at the footage the next day, we’d captured a really cool sequence and it was so worth it.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

David Toms: I understand his reasons for restricting it, I mean, it’s his story you’re adapting, but I’d be lying if I said it wasn’t really frustrating at the time. We were very worried about even putting a trailer on YouTube, as we were only allowed 3 minutes of footage to go online.
I’d like to see it ease up a bit, but some restriction is probably a good idea to stop people taking liberties with the system.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

David Toms: As mentioned by your previous question, only a few people have seen the film all the way through due to distribution restrictions, but those that have seen it have given us positive feedback.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

David Toms: Yes, I’m delighted to say that the film will be screened at the 2017 Dollar Baby Film Festival in The Netherlands, which is really exciting.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

David Toms: I really enjoy King’s writing and definitely some of the adaptations. The latest film IT was fantastic. I really love The Shining (both book and film). I really enjoyed reading some of his short stories actually, it’s some of his best work.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

David Toms: I unfortunately haven’t heard any feedback from his people about the film. I sent it to them via DVD and didn’t receive any response.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

David Toms: As the Dollar Baby terms only mention film students, I’d be reluctant to adapt any more of his short stories at this stage (unless that rule changed). I do however still use some of the dramatic tools I learned from Stationary Bike and adapting it.
If given the chance I would enjoy a crack at Mute, as I think it’s a really interesting premise.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

David Toms: I’ve just finished work on a short film called Astrosapiens, which is set inside a psychiatrist’s office and shows the assessment of an astronaut she goes on a one way mission into space. We’re waiting for several festivals and the NASA Cinespace competition to get back to us about if it has been well received.
Next on the horizon is a TV pilot I’ve been writing set in the mid-to-late seventies about a man who goes to Spain to leave his broken marriage behind, but gets involved in the criminal underworld.
I’ve also just completed a lengthy contract working on a TV documentary about the West Midlands Fire Service.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

David Toms: I’m quite scared of moths…no, seriously.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

David Toms: Thanks for having me on to chat about Bike! You can keep up with my work on www.davidtomsfilm.com and also on Facebook and Twitter – https://www.facebook.com/davidtomsdirector/ & https://twitter.com/davidtoms

He played in Thomas Magnuson’s Dollar Baby The Man Who Loved Flowers as Love.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

David Lee Hess: I’m an actor, improviser, writer, director, and musician living in Los Angeles, California.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The man who loved flowers film?

David Lee Hess: I auditioned for the role of “Love” in Austin, Texas when I still lived there. The Man Who Loved Flowers was one of the last films I shot in Austin before moving to LA in 2015.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

David Lee Hess: The character and plot unfold over time in surprising ways. It’s mysterious and eerie and while it’s violent, the violence is secondary to the tone, the mood of the story.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

David Lee Hess: I auditioned.

SKSM: You worked with Thomas Magnuson on this film, how was that?

David Lee Hess: Thomas was easy to work with. I don’t know if you’re aware that Thomas was in high school when he shot the movie. And while many directors don’t have their stories written by someone as capable as Stephen King, Thomas did an amazing job with verey few resources.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

David Lee Hess: Thomas told me later that his crew members were concerned about me because I kept giving them creepy looks. I don’t remember if I was playing the character or just being weird, but they were compelled to report it.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

David Lee Hess: Thomas just moved to Los Angeles in August 2017, so we’ve hung out. I didn’t keep in touch with the rest of the cast.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

David Lee Hess: In addition to acting in projects out of Los Angeles, I directed a short film called Fetish and have begun submitting to festivals.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

David Lee Hess: Yes. I grew up reading his books and watching the movies based on his work.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

David Lee Hess: I’ve been a musician for over 35 years and have recorded about a dozen albums. Most recently I released two albums: Boo by Baby Got Bacteria and Every Fool in Love by Paper Lawn.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

David Lee Hess: Thanks for watching the film. Thomas did the lion’s share of the work on this movie and given the fact that he was a high school student at the time, I think it turned out great. I’ve worked on all kinds of projects: network television, indie films, student films, etc., and I’m very proud to be part of The Man Who Loved Flowers.

 

He is the man who wrote the script of The Words Of The Prophets Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

James Turner: I’m a recent philosophy graduate from The University of Sheffield. I’m currently looking for work to keep me occupied for a year before I go back to do a Masters and possibly a PhD. I’m working on my second novel while trying to find an agent for my first. I also play in a post-hardcore band called Sobriquet and am currently involved in promotional duties for our upcoming Ep. Akeldama.

SKSM: When did you make The words of the prophets? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

James Turner: We filmed it in the summer of 2015 and had it edited by summer 2016… I think. The production was equal parts fun and infuriating. We had a lot of trouble getting the movie to sound right and often had to film with a crew of only three people. But when it went smoothly it was a really cool experience bringing a Stephen King story to life.

SKSM: How come you picked All that you love will be carried away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

James Turner: We knew from the beginning we’d be working with a small crew and a very limited budget – about thirty pounds, actually – so we knew we’d have to pick a story that required minimal locations and characters. All That You Love Will Be Carried Away is a story about one man in one room, and even though we added a couple of characters and locations to that, it still meant that our cast and crew list could be kept to a minimum.
In all honesty, ATYLWBCA isn’t my favourite King story. If I had the chance, the one short story of his I’d like to adapt would be The Man in the Black Suit. However, The Words of the Prophets was a good opportunity for us to learn how to adapt King’s work. His stories often delve deep into characters’ psyches, and because of that they are quite hard to adapt into film. We’d promised ourselves that we wouldn’t use a voice-over to convey the character’s thoughts, so instead came up with other ways to express his declining mental state. We went for parallel narratives, one lifted from the story itself, and the other fabricated by ourselves. Though this didn’t always work as well as we would have liked, I’m glad we did it rather than rely on using a voice-over.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favourite works and adaptations.

James Turner: Absolutely! King is basically the reason why I started writing my own novels. My personal favourite books of his are those in the Dark Tower series. We even threw a couple of Dark Tower references into WOTP.
As for adaptations, I’d have to go with The Shawshank Redemption. Frank Darabont seems to be the only person who can consistently nail King adaptations, and shows a profound understanding of why the stories are so good in the first place. It’s about the characters, people, not the scares.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

James Turner: I knew about the whole ‘dollar baby’ thing before I asked to adapt his story. How I found out about it, I honestly can’t remember.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

James Turner: Seeing as the movie is about graffiti, we filmed some scenes in a public bathroom. Well, a university bathroom. We filmed in the summer holidays so there weren’t too many people around, but we still had to cordon off the bathroom while we were filming – two dudes and one big camera in a unisex bathroom looks a little odd, you know what I’m saying? As it turns out, people don’t read signs, and we kept getting barged in on. Later, the security guard found us and told us we couldn’t film there without prior permission, and our excuse that “Stephen King said we could do this,” didn’t hold much water. We got round it eventually, but it was a real effort.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe an internet/dvd release would be possible?

James Turner: It’s a shame people can’t see it, and if anything changes contract wise be sure that we’ll release it for all to see on YouTube.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

James Turner: Seeing as we’ve only screened it once and the majority of the people who have seen it have been somewhat involved in the production, we haven’t really had any official reviews. Audience reactions have been positive though. Some of our practical effects have had people jumping or squirming in their seats, and other than a couple of pacing issues that even we recognise, people have overall found the film quite enjoyable.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

James Turner: Not at the moment. Me and Mark are currently working on other films and have a lot else on our plates right now. However, if a Dollar Baby festival were to be held, we’d definitely put the WOTP forward.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

James Turner: We had contact with his secretary when sorting out the boring rights stuff, and at the end we did send him a copy of the film along with a letter, so we assume he’s seen it, though he hasn’t replied so maybe he hasn’t. It’s more likely though that he saw it and didn’t think much of it.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

James Turner: I’d love to, though I’m not exactly planning on making any more. Writing and academia has taken over my life at this point. Though if the opportunity arose to take part in a bigger Stephen King project, I’d sure as hell want to be part of it.
The one story I’d really like to be involved in is The Gunslinger. I saw the Dark Tower adaptation the other day and oh my god was it awful. I think we just need to treat it as a mistake and start from scratch.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

James Turner: I’m currently working on my second novel while trying to find an agent for my first. I also play in a post-hardcore band called Sobriquet and am currently involved in promotional duties for our upcoming Ep. Akeldama. Film wise, I’m still acting and doing voice-over work, but only bits and bobs.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

James Turner: If we have any fans, thanks for fanning. If you want to keep up your fandom, follow me on twitter @JTAuthor. Most of the stuff I post is about the latest UFC events, but every now and again I’ll post something film/book related. I’ll also have a blog out soon, which I’ll post on my twitter feed, so there’s that to look forward to if you’re a fan of dry, pseudo-academic essays about morality.

 

He is the man behind The Words Of The Prophets Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark Howarth: I’m currently a freelance videographer and independent filmmaker based in Sheffield where I’ve just graduated from university with a degree in English Language and Linguistics. Been creating for as long as I can remember in both film and literature but it’s ultimately film for which I have the greatest passion.

SKSM: When did you make The words of the prophets? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mark Howarth: Yeah, we had a lot of difficulty with malfunctioning equipment and such but managed to do the best with what and who we had available. Principal photography lasted probably about two weeks – we were in rather a rush and had to work very quickly – with a series of pickups towards the end of summer 2015 just to make the edit work a little better.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favourite works and adaptations.

Mark Howarth: James is definitely the King-buff of the two of us. Like, I’ve obviously been aware of King’s work but the only experience I’ve had of it has been through the film adaptations. I don’t know if this response is going to earn me grounds for crucifixion among Stephen King purists but Kubrick’s adaptation of the Shining was probably my initial introduction to and abiding memory of King’s work. But I’d tend to agree with my learned colleague in that Darabont’s Shawshank is probably my favourite King adaptation.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Mark Howarth: Got a message from James, something along the lines of “want to make a Stephen King film?” – I didn’t hesitate.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mark Howarth: Oh god, the bathroom scene… that was interesting. But I’d have to go with shooting the exterior shots from the film’s climax where Zimmer puts his life in the hands of fate. The wide shots were interesting since setting the camera up on the far side of the pond, concealed by bushes, left James on his own and in full view of half of Endcliffe Student village… in broad daylight…. holding a gun to his temple… I fully expected to hear sirens.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Mark Howarth: When we screened it for the filmmaking society at uni, a few of the alumni who showed up to see it thought we’d really succeeded it building a creepy and emotional atmosphere throughout the film so that was nice to hear. Obviously, staring at the footage for hours on end, made me numb to the actual emotions that would be felt by a live audience so it was nice to hear that our intentions had been successful therein.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mark Howarth: Call me a dreamer, I’d like to see Pet Sematary done well on screen. Before I read it, the number of people telling me it would make me “question my own morality” had me almost afraid to open the cover. I reckon it’d be a really interesting experiment to translate something on that level of disturbing into film.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Mark Howarth: Despite graduating, I’m still heavily involved in the Sheffield Student Filmmaking Society. I’m doing a lot of editing work at the minute, working on the first projects of a lot of close friends and am, of course, working on my own projects. My own personal projects span a wide array of platforms: I’ve got my films and novels currently under construction, I’m working on character design for a graphic novel I’ve been planning for some time now and a handful of others so I’m keeping rather busy creatively.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Mark Howarth: Yay, fans! Good to think that we might have one or two but I reckon we’re too modest to hope for that. But if people are interested in my work, they can check out some of my other pieces at www.markhowarthfilms.com, got lots of interesting projects coming up soon so I hope people find some of them work looking at!

He played in Peter Szabo’s Dollar Baby Love Never Dies as Officer LeBeau.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Colin Paradine: I am Colin Paradine and I am an actor, writer and producer based out of Toronto, Canada.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Love never dies Dollar Baby film?

Colin Paradine: I was approached by the director, Peter Szabo. We had previously worked together and he there was a part in this upcoming Stephen King short that he was directing that he was interested in having me play. As soon as I Heard Stephen King, I was in. I didn’t even have to see the script.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Colin Paradine: Like most of King’s work, it has a completely relatable quality to it that appeals to a very wide audience and that has always been my draw to his work. He makes it very easy for his readers to slip into the worlds he creates and this one was no different. It had rich characters, the wonderful backdrop on Maine and King’s trademark dialogue that is almost like a second nature to most, if not all readers of his work.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Colin Paradine: No, I didn’t have to audition, nor was the role specifically written for me. Peter just called me one day and asked if I would like to play a cop in a Stephen King short and I had to jump at the opportunity.

SKSM: You worked with Peter Szabo on this film, how was that?

Colin Paradine: It was great! I have worked with Peter both prior to and since Love Never Dies and in different capacities. I have worked with him as a director and as a producer and in both roles Peter has a certain cerebral way of running his sets. Everything is thought out, planned and at the ready. Sure, there is always some form of improvisation when things don’t go according to plan, but he always has a way around those obstacles.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Colin Paradine: You’ll have to forgive me on this one. It was quite a while back that we shot Love Never Dies and the night was a bit of a blur. I remember it being very cold and thinking at the time how lucky the other actors, Reese Eveneshen and Erin Stuart were to be sitting inside of a nice warm car for the whole scene.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Colin Paradine: Oh yes, I see most of them regularly. In fact Peter Szabo and I were in Reese Eveneshen and Erin Stuart’s wedding this past summer.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Colin Paradine: I have a sci/fi/action feature film coming out in the next couple of months that Peter Szabo produced and Reese Eveneshen wrote and directed and I also have a post-apocalyptic web series that I wrote and will direct that I am in the process of securing funding for.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Colin Paradine: I am very much a fan of his work. I have been since I was old enough to read his books. While I have enjoyed his later work, the older stories are my favorites, specifically the Bachman Books. I love those short stories!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Colin Paradine: I’m also a musician. I play drums. Preferably to some loud and heavy rock n’ roll.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Colin Paradine: Thanks for reading and remember to support your local independent arts scene.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Colin Paradine: Thanks for to opportunity to share some fond memories and working on a fun project. Here’s hoping all King fans will get to see it! Cheers!

He is the man behind Willa Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Corey Mayne: My name is Corey Mayne, I’ve been into filmmaking ever since I caught the tail-end of Batman 1989 on VHS, particularly horror and sci-fi. I’m an industry visual effects artist who has worked at Sony Imageworks, Pixar and now Vikings at one of Toronto’s leading production companies.

SKSM: When did you make Willa? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Corey Mayne: We started pre-production a month or so ago, and are slated to shoot in early November. Then there will be about 3 months of post production.

SKSM: How come you picked Willa to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Corey Mayne: I loved the idea of doing a classic ghost story with heart. I loved how it explored themes of overcoming isolation and persevering for those you really care about. It was very atmospheric and stuck with me after I read it.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wikd guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Corey Mayne: Blind luck. I read Willa a long time ago and Barb and I were itching to work together again. So we discovered the Dollar Baby program by chance and Willa was one of the stories I was already familiar with.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Corey Mayne: Most of the funny things that happen probably aren’t funny to anyone else. They’re pretty moronic or politically incorrect, but that’s one of the great things that happen when you are a part of a tightly-knit team.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Corey Mayne: I understand why that is part of the option agreement and it’s totally fair. We are making this for the fans and they can see it by contributing, we’ll do a password protected premiere after it has run the festival circuit, but I don’t see why it would change in the future. It would pose too many legal issues for Stephen King I think.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Corey Mayne: No reviews yet!

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Corey Mayne: TIFF, Screamfest LA, Austin Film Festival, whatever we can do!

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations.

Corey Mayne: Hell yes. The scariest book I read of his was also the first — Cycle of the Werewolf.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Corey Mayne: No, just his agent who was very accommodating. Hopefully when we finish the film, he might spare a few minutes.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories?

Corey Mayne: If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?
I can barely think past this one at the moment, we’re working so hard. One thing at a time.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Corey Mayne: I’m working on Vikings, which is a thrilling historical action/drama with so many talented people involved.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Corey Mayne: I spent my last vacation learning backflips and kong vaults.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Corey Mayne: Production has been so incredibly time-consuming, and it won’t lighten up until we have wrapped, especially since our entire crew have industry day jobs, but the support we are getting from fans this early into the journey has been astounding. It is fuel to keep doing our best and we just really hope they enjoy what we are trying to bring them.

SKSM: Would you like to add something?

Corey Mayne: If they wish to follow our progress and even contribute to the project in any way, they are welcome to visit www.willamovie.com or follow us on Facebook and give us a shout. Thanks!

 

He played in Jesse James Marshall’s Dollar Baby Cain Rose Up as Curt Garrish.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Ryan Barton: My name is Ryan C. Barton and I’m an actor located in Toronto.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Cain rose up Dollar Baby film?

Ryan Barton: It’s sort of a long story. My friend Dylan Colton (who is also in the film) actually connected me with Jesse Marshall, the director, after he saw the script and thought that I’d be a good fit for the lead. So I contacted Jesse and the rest is history.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Ryan Barton: I suppose what attracts people to the story is that it’s, ironically, very unattractive. Gun violence and mental illness are very ugly subjects, and with this story you’re able to examine them from a safe distance.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Ryan Barton: I did have to audition! There’s not too much of a story there, I just sent in a self-tape and thankfully Jesse liked it!

SKSM: You worked with Jesse James Marshall on this film, how was that?

Ryan Barton: It was great! Jesse is a very talented director and it was an absolute blast getting to work with him on this. I think he’s definitely going places.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Ryan Barton: There was one thing. So in the film my character has a sniper rifle, and originally the rifle had a set of legs that you pulled down and it made the most satisfying and badass click. So we did a rehearsal a few times, but when it came time to shoot, I pulled the legs down, but instead of there being that badass click, I just broke the legs clean off. Needless to say I was very embarrassed!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Ryan Barton: I still talk to Jesse sometimes. We’ve talked about doing another project together, which I’d love to do.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Ryan Barton: Unfortunately not too much. I have my fingers in a few different scripts that I’m trying to write, but other than that and my day jobs, nothing.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Ryan Barton: I’m a huge fan! I’ve been reading his books and short stories since I was about twelve. He’s an amazing author. I actually just saw IT the other night and it completely blew me away.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Ryan Barton: I’m actually only 4-foot-5. The budget for digitally altering my height in the film was astronomical.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Ryan Barton: No problem, thank you the opportunity! As for fans, I can’t imagine I have any at this point, other than maybe my parents!

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Ryan Barton: Just that I can’t wait to hear what people think of the film!

 

He played in Matthew J. Rowney’s Dollar Baby I Am The Doorway as Arthur.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Greg Patmore: I’m from the north of England, a town called Wigan, famous for Rugby League and George Orwell’s Road to Wigan Pier. My dad was a soldier then a truck driver, my mum a nurse then a midwife. I grew up playing in brass bands and getting into school plays, but got into university to study music. I was the first in my whole family ever to get into university, Goldsmith’s College, University of London.
After that I worked in a variety of jobs, never really settling but having to do whatever it took to get by, so a lot of jobs I hated. Eventually I met my wife of 24 years and we launched our own business in 1997. In 2008, I decided to try to work as an actor musician. 3 years later I was in Hatfields & McCoys as Good ‘Lias Hatfield alongside Kevin Costner.

SKSM: How did you become involved in I am the doorway Dollar Baby film?

Greg Patmore: Matt called me out of the blue. I liked him. I liked the script. I did it.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Greg Patmore: It’s a great story. Complex, layered, terrifying and a little bit creepy too. I’m Matts hands it had a little of everything.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Greg Patmore: Not sure it was written ‘for’ me, but no audition. Matt just asked me outright.

SKSM: You worked with Matthew J. Rowney on this film, how was that?

Greg Patmore: Very good. Matt knows what he wants, and more importantly he knows when he’s got it. No extra takes for safety or extra angles for options. He’s clear in his mind and it makes it easy to deliver. He also listens to ideas and suggestions too, which makes it a collaboration.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Greg Patmore: Basically my whole role was shot in a day. We had more time scheduled, but Matt knew what he wanted and I hit it, I guess, so I got home early! That was great.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Greg Patmore: With several actually by Facebook. Matt, Ollie, most of them really.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Greg Patmore: I’m doing a lot of audio drama with Big Finish, also I’ve always loved books, so I do a lot of audiobooks. I love it. And I live a lot of the time on a barge in France, so it’s something I can do between acting roles even when I’m in the middle of nowhere.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Greg Patmore: Yes. A huge fan since I was young. I read everything I could get my hands on by him back then, and I’ve read more of his books than by any other author. Favourites include Christine, Firestarter, Needful Things, Pet Sematary, Carrie… so many.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Greg Patmore: I’m shy. Really quite reclusive unless I fight it. No one believes that, but it’s true.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Greg Patmore: Watch out for Matt. He’s going to make big movies one day. I just hope I’m involved, as we worked great together.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Greg Patmore: The Dark Half. Carried off by a flock of birds? I never really bought that. Looking forward to the new IT movie, though. Love that book…
And was Stephen King a Ray Bradbury fan, because I sense so much common ground in their writing.

 

He played in David Toms’ Dollar Baby Bike as Wheeler.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Adrian Annis: I’m an actor who either appears in weird and wonderful shorts films or plays weird and wonderful characters in such films.

SKSM: How did you become involved into Bike Dollar Baby film?

Adrian Annis: I became involved in Bike via the usual process. I saw a casting call on a casting web site, it intrigued me, I applied, I auditioned via Skype, I got the part and I filmed it.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Adrian Annis: I think like most Stephen King adaptations the writing makes you think and question yourself. Bike is a prime example of that.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Adrian Annis: I had to cast by the wonderful medium of Skype over a broadband that was not much better than dial up. I was amazed they could even make my face out to be honest!

SKSM: You worked with David Toms on this film, how was that?

Adrian Annis: David was an actors Director. What I mean by that he was very open at allowing a scene to flow and make minor tweaks with each run though. He let it be natural.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Adrian Annis: Well we filmed it along a country road very late at night around March time. So it was cold and if I remember rightly wet! Now actors can be a moany bunch at the best of times, however one of the other actors, Denny Hodge, does some amazing impressions of some of the main Saturday night TV characters of the 80s. So yes cold and wet but laughing our heads off!!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Adrian Annis: I’m still in contact with David Toms, Denny and Steve. Mainly on Facebook, but also out of the social medium spectrum. At castings, filming etc

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Adrian Annis: I have a few projects in the pipeline that are very much in the development stage. I don’t want to jinx them by mentioning their names as yet….. Silly I know!!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Adrian Annis: I’ve been a huge fan of Stephen King for a very long time. My first exposure was from me sneaking out of my bedroom and watching Salems Lot over my parents shoulders. I don’t think I have slept with my window open ever since. Plus my fear of Clowns went to ‘needing counselling’ levels after IT.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Adrian Annis: That I’m a collector of cult novels and comics. I even had a 1st Edition of Junk, William Burroughs 1st novel. You notice the past tense in that statement……. it still pains me to think of it’s demise!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Adrian Annis: Enjoy the wonder of Stephen Kings works and their screen adaptions!

 

He is the man behind Here There Be Tygers Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mike Johnston: My name is Mike Johnston, I am an independent filmmaker from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. I was born and raised in Oakville, Ontario, Canada and moved to Vancouver to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Film Production from the University of British Columbia, which I completed in 2017.
Currently I work as a Key Grip in the film industry in Vancouver as well as produce independent content such as music videos, short films and various commercials and web ads in Vancouver.

SKSM: When did you make Here there be tygers? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mike Johnston: Here There Be Tygers is my sixth short film as a director. We began prepping for the film in Vancouver in September 2016 and shot it in December 2016. After 5 months of post-production, the film was completed in May 2017.
The film cost approximately $8,000 including post production costs and was we completed principal photography in just 2 days, which was quite remarkable for the piece we were shooting and the gags and visuals involved.

SKSM: How come you picked Here there be tygers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mike Johnston: The decision to adapt Here There Be Tygers is an interesting one. In August 2016, I had just completed the festival circuit with my last film, “Victory Falls”, which I wrote and directed, and was searching for my next project. I was writing a variety of pieces and wasn’t really getting excited about any of them. I also find that I need to constantly push the boundary or challenge myself with my work, and I was looking for the right way to challenge myself after “Victory Falls” – a wrestling film that took place during the 1996 World Championships and on the water.

I started looking into adaptation, and came across Stephen King’s dollar baby program on his fan website. It was an exciting concept for an independent filmmaker looking for his next project, so I started reading a variety of different Stephen King short stories and came across “Here There Be Tygers”, and decided to submit to adapt that one. I emailed Margaret Morehouse, signed the contract and sent $1 American dollar bill in the mail. I don’t think he would have accepted a Canadian loonie.
I think what interested me so much in “Here There Be Tygers” is that I found the character of Charles very relatable, especially to a young me. I was always the kid who was day dreaming in elementary school, never really listening in class and I saw a lot of that in Charles. Especially with how I chose to adapt the film, the realism of the tiger is up for debate and for the audience to interpret in their own imagination, which is really what Charles is doing. He is this boy with a wonderful imagination, who at the end of the day just wants to go to the bathroom and get back to class. And I found this very relatable and I think a lot of kids can too. It was nice to take a break from the moody dramas that I am used to making and adapt a fantastic kid-oriented fantasy film by one of my biggest creative inspirations.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mike Johnston: The entire experience was special for me. For all my other previous short films that I have directed, I have also written. And I think, when we act as both writers and directors, we put a tremendous responsible on our shoulders as creatives. Not only are you responsible for the creative direction and storytelling of the film, but I find you can also back yourself into a corner obsessing over every word and every little detail. My focus when directing is always the performances of the actors and how the camera drives those performances. Having not written this film, that additional pressure was off and it was now an open opportunity for me to play with someone else’s work and adapt it to the screen.
There is still a tremendous responsibility in that, but the obsession over dialogue and every spoken word goes away, and you can let the actors really play and that is the way I want to make movies going forward. I was very lucky to work with a young man by the name of Logan Oung who played Charles. A young boy, still finding his way in the world of acting and film, etc. but also unbelievably smart, he challenged me in a lot of ways and pushed me to be better and to be better for him as well. An awesome moment we shared actually happened during rehearsal, days before principal photography. We were rehearsing in a small room and I was going through the blocking of when he first sees the tiger, one of the most important scenes in the film. And he wasn’t really getting it. I started stressing out a bit, like have I made a huge mistake, did I mess up in the casting, is it my direction, etc. So we sat down and we talked for a while and we figured out that we both loved video games. And once I was able to relate the action and the blocking to an experience he had playing video games, he got it immediately. It was awesome to see this switch flip, when he got it – he got it. And because of the way we chose to shoot the film, much like Steven Spielberg’s “JAWS”, the film is driven by his performance and the success of it rides on his shoulders. Needless to say, I believe the film is what it is because of Logan and what he brought to the film and I couldn’t have done it without him.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Mike Johnston: It is disappointing, as I would love to share my work with other Stephen King fans and dollar baby filmmakers, but I also respect and understand the rules and as to why we cannot share our films on the internet as of yet. Hopefully that could change over time, but I don’t expect it to.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Mike Johnston: So far, all the reviews we have received from peers, critics, festivals, etc. have been very positive, which is awesome because I really put the pressure on myself to uphold the legend and the quality of the short story as well as the Stephen King name, so to hear good things from my peers and critics alike, is great.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Mike Johnston: My priority is to screen the film at as many Dollar Baby film festivals as possible. We have already been accepted to one in the Netherlands in November, which is awesome news. As well, we are currently in consideration for the King on Screen film festival. Outside of those, I would love to see the film play at the Vancouver Short Film Festival or East Van Showcase, but time will tell and see where it takes us.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations.

Mike Johnston: I am a huge Stephen King fan, have been since I was a teenager. He is one of my greatest inspirations in filmmaking. “The Mist”, ‘The Shining” and “It” are some of the early works that got me interested in a future in filmmaking as well as the films. Whenever a Stephen King novel or film becomes available, I make sure to make time to read it or see it. So, 2017 is a great year for him so I will be spending lots of time in the theatre or on Netflix watching Stephen King adaptations.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Mike Johnston: I have yet to hear anything from Mr. King, and I cannot confirm if he has seen the film or not. Needless to say, if he did see it and was able to comment on the film, that would be one of the greatest honours I would have as a young filmmaker.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mike Johnston: Actually, I have already begun light prep for my next short film, which I believe will be a Stephen King adaptation. The short story is called “Rest Stop” and is about a writer who stops in a gas station washroom for a break and overhears a man beating his wife in the other washroom. As such, he decides to take matters into his own hands like the characters in his books. Another very relatable story in my eyes, I think everyone at one point or another in life has fantasized about being the action hero and taking the law into their own hands, for better or worst and as such a character that we can all get behind and understand, even on deeper levels. Clearly I enjoy making films in bathrooms.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Mike Johnston: Right now I am working with a production company in Vancouver which works in conjunction with the Lifetime Network and Hallmark Channel to produce ten television movies a year, we just wrapped our 6th production this year and are starting the 7th next week. I currently working as the Key Grip there, the head of the Grip Department. Additionally, I am prepping to produce and direct, “Rest Stop”, my second Stephen King dollar baby film. As well, as in the early development stages of outlining my first feature film, currently titled, “Shrapnel”.

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