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He is the Composer of Dan Sellers‘ Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Matt Vucic: I am a film composer and songwriter living in the United States. I started playing the drums at a very young age and grew up playing in rock, fusión, jazz, and country bands. I eventually got into songwriting which lead me to scoring films.

SKSM: How did you become involved with Uncle Otto’s truck?

Matt Vucic: I was introduced to Dan (director) by a mutual friend and filmmaker. I read the script and really liked the visión Dan had for the film. Im also a huge Stephen King fan so I jumped at the chance to get involved.

SKSM: How did you get started as a composer and what do you do on production?

Matt Vucic: Although I’ve always loved film scores and grew up listening to them I never really saw myself as a composer. That all changed when a good friend of mine asked me to score a film he was working on about 6 years ago. Ever since then I have been hooked. I consider myself a storyteller so writing music for film is a great fit for me.

SKSM: How did you get started to wrote the Soundtrack for Uncle Otto’s truck?

Matt Vucic: Working on Uncle Otto’s Truck was a unique experience in that I didn’t score to picture. I did see a rough cut of the film so I was able to get a good feel for Dan’s visión. But he was still in the editing phase of post-production so we decided that I would write a few cues and he would edit them into the picture as he saw fit. I probably spent the most time on the opening cue as that set the tone for the film.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the music that you would like to tell me about?

Matt Vucic: Well I won’t give it away for those who havn’t seen the film. But there was a scare moment in the film that made me jump out of my seat when I was watching the first edit.

SKSM: After Uncle Otto’s truck did you write more music? If so what?

Matt Vucic: Yes. While I was working on Uncle Otto’s Truck I was also scoring another horror film called Psyscho Path. You can listen to the soundtrack here. https://mattvucic.hearnow.com/

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Matt Vucic: Right now I have two different suites of music I hope to reléase in the coming months. Also, there is a good chance I will be scoring a feature horror film this summer.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Matt Vucic: Absolutely. I have read and enjoyed so many Stephan King books. Most recently I read 11/22/63 and count it as a favorite. Amazing story!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Matt Vucic: No surprises. I wear my heart on my sleeve.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be musicians?

Matt Vucic: One thing comes to mind. Learn the business of music. Because it is a business.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Matt Vucic: It’s my pleasure. Thank you for giving me the opportunity. Streaming movies is fun. But don’t stop going to see movies in theaters. Nothing beats that experience!

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Matt Vucic: Sure. If you are interested in keeping up with me and my work. Here are a few links. Say Hello!

Twitter @mattvucic

Instagram @mattvucic

Facebook @officialmattvucic

www.mattvucic.com

Im also on Apple Music, Spotify and all other major music streaming services.

Cheers!

 

He played in Dan Sellers’ Dollar Baby Uncle Otto’s Truck as George McCutcheon.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Tom Gore: Originally from Newport, RI. I spent 20 years in the Army as an Apache Longbow Helicopter pilot, now retired and currently a student at Methodist University, working towards my BFA in Graphic Design and playing Defensive Lineman on the school’s football team.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Tom Gore: In high school, I was part of a class that put on a theater show and enjoyed it so much that it was ingrained forever as a part of my life. As I was finishing up my time in the army, I thought to myself, and considered what would I do now that I’m not in the army anymore. My processes all led to me acting and there I followed suit on a course of action that payed of with that actual goal. I am eternally grateful to all those who’ve either come before me or have said yes and let me be someone else for even a brief moment.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Uncle Ottos truck Dollar Baby film?

Tom Gore: Dan Sellers called me up and asked and I said yes.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Tom Gore: It’s a Stephen King story so his name alone will attract attention, but I believe that Dan’s ability as a storyteller is what keeps people in their seats to watch it.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Tom Gore: Thankfully no, I didn’t have to audition, Dan knew exactly how he wanted to tell the story and I’m grateful he chose me to portray George and breathe live into him.

SKSM: You worked with Dan Sellers on this film, how was that?

Tom Gore: It was great, Dan is a fantastic director, he knows how he wants to tell his story, puts it together, and gets us to execute his vision. I’ve worked with him before on other projects and we do have a special chemistry that allows for greater exploration of the story and the characters. I’ve been very fortunate to call Dan a great friend also.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Tom Gore: Oh whew, (SPOILER ALERT) ok in this story my character is killed. Now to show this on camera we brought in an amazing Special Effects Wizard named Matt Patterson (seriously, hire this guy). Getting in position for the death sequence was it own challenge, its dark, late, we’ve already filmed almost all day, and limited lighting in an unknown field. We’re all trying to be safe and quick to make sure we get everything Dan needs to tell his story and fortunately everyone was on board with this mentality (a rare occurrence in retrospect). So I’m laying down under the truck and Matt’s over me with a bucket of red slime and chunks and viscera and says right before he dumps the contents on to me, “I even have teeth in this batch.” The inclusion of teeth through me for a loop, so many questions entered my head at the moment he splatters me I was at a loss for words; like who’s teeth? Where did these teeth come from? Human teeth? How many teeth? Why is there teeth? When did you decide that this extra special batch of FX goo should include teeth???

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Tom Gore: I am lucky and fortunate enough to have a great relationship with many of the cast and crew on this project. Dan and Sammie Cassell host a movie pod cast and let me be a special guest from time to time. I’ve worked with Matt and his wife on lotsa projects and look forward to all future occasions cause I know it’ll be great. Mike and Devlin are Father/Son in real life and it’s always great hanging out and doing stuff where we run into each other.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Tom Gore: I’m currently a Junior at Methodist University working on my Bachelors in Fine Arts in Graphic Design as well as a Nose Tackle on the football team.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Tom Gore: As a horror fan, how can you not be?

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Tom Gore: There’s a lot that would surprise people; I was on the show Superhuman on Fox season 1 episode 4, I have seven awesome kids, the youngest is 18, I deployed 3 times to Afghanistan and once to Iraq during the “surge” while in the army.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Tom Gore: Thank you for having me. Please continue to support indie horror films, and most importantly be awesome to everybody!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Tom Gore: You can find more of my work at www.imdb.me/tomgore

 

She wrote the script of Mark Hensley‘s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Can you introduce yourself to our readers?

Peggy Lewis: My name is Peggy Lewis. I moved to L.A. from Canada 10 years ago.

SKSM: You wrote the script for The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby Film. I watched the film and I loved the changes with respect to the original short story. Why did you make these changes?

Peggy Lewis: I loved the story but felt that there were suspenseful details in the original script that are great in written word but would not translate to film and be lost.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a screenwriter?

Peggy Lewis: It has always been in the back of my mind, but it was my husbands encouragement that got me to act on that desire

SKSM: How do you communicate with a director to design a screenwriter strategy for a film?

Peggy Lewis: The director gives me the general direction he wants to take the story. Then I take it and write what I think fits the feel he is going for.

SKSM: You worked in a Dollar Baby based on a Stephen King short story. It was your most challenging film?

Peggy Lewis: No not at all. I wrote the script really quickly, really just an afternoon. I was already starting with such a strong foundation, and had a very clear vision of what the film would look like

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Peggy Lewis: Its Stephen King. You know it is going to be good with a crazy twist.

SKSM: Can you tell us about the filming steps? Funny things that happened so far (Bloopers, etc).

Peggy Lewis: There are always funny things that happen on any set. For flowers there were a few. Flubbed lines and such.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Peggy Lewis: I am in the middle of a stage musical script.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Peggy Lewis: My first marriage was to a Hells Angel. Now I like to sew, bake and write.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Something you’d like to tell our readers?

Peggy Lewis: If you have dreams go after them.

 

He played in Rob Darren‘s Dollar Baby Mute as Cowboy Bob.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Doc Phineas Kastle: I am Doc Phineas an actor with 62 years experience in the film industry.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Doc Phineas Kastle: Mute is my 44th movie I started my TV film career at the age of 6 appearing on the Pinky Lee Show, Mickey Mouse Club, directed by Alfred Hitchcock and have worked with legendary stars like Bette Davis, Tony Curtis, Barbara Stanwyck, Doris Day and Nick Cage. I am currently on worldwide TV on Pawn Stars on the History Channel, on Mysteries at the Museum and Haunted Hospitals on the Travel channel, Jay Leno’s Garage on CNBC.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Mute Dollar Baby film?

Doc Phineas Kastle: I loved making MUTE. I so enjoyed playing Cowboy Bob in a fun comic tragic role. 

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Doc Phineas Kastle: I believe the rôle was written for me.

SKSM: You worked with Rob Darren on this film, how was that?

Doc Phineas Kastle: I love working with Rob Darren. He’s a good friend and so fun and encouraging. He sets the direct for an actor and then just lets you run. I love that because my characters become so much a part of me that I just take those roles to such an amazing place within…

They always reveal something profoundly emotional, vulnerable, fun and tragic at the same time. I have been acting many years its just the way it is with me!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Doc Phineas Kastle: My favorite moment in making the movie was my scene with actress Donna Hamblin when I picked her up at a bar and took her to a motel. The sexy kinky scene we did in the motel left us laughing hilariously. First Donna is a dear friend and we appear in the new SAG TV series «War of the Gods» together. So when you are playing a love interest with a dear friend… its already funny. I was chasing her around the motel room wearing a mask and we looked at each other burst into laughter and were rolling on the floor!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Doc Phineas Kastle: My new projects are: I am currently starring in the movie DUDS as Charlie Chaplin. We just won Best Comedy Short at Tokyo Film fest! I am in a great new movie playing the role of Director James in the Steampunk Adventures of Salem Tusk written by Marvel Comics Tom Rasch. I have a new TV Show in development where I star as a psychic detective entitled «Touched».

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Doc Phineas Kastle: I am a HUGE fan of Stephen King.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Doc Phineas Kastle: I am a bit unusual in the Hollywood film industry in that I have a PH.D in archaeology…

I am like the real Indiana Jones and still go on digs in Valley of the Kings in Egypt. I have been on archaeological expeditions in 122 countries. I am fluent in 8 languages including 3 languages from India. I am an author of 5 books and a jazz pianist. I perform with the Good Hurt Band in Las Vegas. I perform on the Las Vegas Strip in the Broadway Show «ALICE». These are some things fans may not know about me.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Doc Phineas Kastle: I loved being in the movie MUTE. I look forward to more film roles with Rob Darren – he is a fantastic guy! A big HOLA to all my fans in España and I hope you love the movie!

He is the Cinematographer of Dan SellersUncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Zack Fox: Hello, I am Zack Fox, Winston-Salem, NC based photographer and cinematographer. I served as the cinematographer on Wreak Havoc Productions ‘Uncle Otto’s Truck’ and many other projects with them.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a cinematographer?

Zack Fox: I’ve grew up shooting on my family’s old film camera. It’s aways just been my thing.

SKSM: How do you communicate with a director to design a visual strategy for a film?

Zack Fox: I’ve been the DP for the team behind Wreak Havoc Productions (Dan Sellers and Sammie Cassell) several times now. We all work great together.

Dan and I have developed a nice on set short hand and trust. He lets me take nice creative liberties.

SKSM: You worked with Dan Sellers on this film, what do you think the relationship between a director and a dp should be?

Zack Fox: I pitched an idea of using a weird mixture of Tilt Shift and Wide Angle lenses for the film, shooting on the Canon R. Dan and Sammie completely supported it. I think everyone was very please with how it came out.

SKSM: You worked in a Dollar Baby based on a Stephen King short story. It was your most challenging film?

Zack Fox: The most challenging aspect of the film we were 15 plus miles from any electrical, running water, and zero cell service.  The house we shot in had no power. Everything had to be powered by batteries or generators. A single light would attract every bug for 10 miles. But no one complained, everyone had a great time and got the job done. 

SKSM: When you’re going to shoot, what are your favorite lenses? formats?

Zack Fox: When shooting for films, my go to favorite camera is the RED Gemini (Although, rarely is it budget friendly) It’s small, mighty, and the dual sensitivity is both the beauty and the beast.

For photography, I have always have in my go bag a Fuji X100F, Canon 5D Mark iii, 24-70mm canon micro, and 70-200mm canon f2.8.

I also modified a kit of 35mm anamorphic film projector lenses into camera lenses, but needless to say – focusing isn’t easy.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Zack Fox: As for special moment… I think the obvious answer is Mike Burke and Devlin Burke – father and son actors playing Otto. I’ve worked with Mike several times and he’s a leading caliber actor. I can definitely say Devlin will be too. For the early parts of the film we have Devlin playing young Otto, later in the film we have his father, Mike. There’s a great scene in the film where you see young Otto change to old Otto, it’s fun to watch the actors change in a blink and see the striking resemblance. It’s nearly seamless. No special events or make up needed to make the audience understand it’s the same character. It’s just father and son. Dan made a great choice when casting both of them.

SKSM: Who are some of your influences (favorite dps/films)?

Zack Fox: My influences for DPs would have to start with Thomas Del Ruth and his extraordinary work on ‘The West Wing’. Some of my core memories of love of filmmaking/cinematography began with this show. Two Cathedrals, Noel and Arctic Radar are among my favorite episodes by him. Another core memory of influence would be when watching 1998’s ‘Meet Joe Black’.  Emmanuel Lubezki work on that film still holds up to one of my all time favorites, it inspires me every single time. As for more recent/current work, Greig Fraser has to be my favorite. For one, his cinematography in Rouge One is outstanding and by far, far (away) my favorite work on any Star Wars.

His color palettes, subtle camera movement and lens choices are always flawless. I can get lost in his technique.  I can’t wait to see what he does on Disney + for The Mandalorian.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Zack Fox: I’ve honestly never have read the story Uncle Otto’s Truck Story before filming the movie. When Dan first pitched the dollar baby to me I thought it was some kind of evil ‘Tow Mater’ from Disney’s Cars story. After the project was green lit, I read the story. I’ve read many of Kings novels, although my person favorite novel of his is is his memoir, ‘On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft’. I really love King’s own story and where he comes from. You learn a lot about him and from him. That’s an excellent book for anyone wanting to get into the ‘arts’ of any kind. I personally used that memoir as more source material and story mind set more than the Skeleton Crew collection.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Zack Fox: I’m finishing up post-production on my new short film that I wrote and directed, Sea Salt Wind. The film is a drama about mistakes, love, flawed people and self-penance. I co-produced the film with Wreak Havoc Productions. We’re planning on shopping this short film around at festivals as a trailer to help find funding for a full feature film version. Uncle Otto’s Truck and Sea Salt Wind’s principal photography were only weeks apart. Michael Burke, Tom Gore, Jennie Stencel all have small cameo roles in this too.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Zack Fox: I’m a co-owner of a movie theater.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Zack Fox: Thank you for taking the time to read this and I hope you enjoyed the film! You can find more on this film and my other work on Instagram @charmfoxphotowsnc.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Zack Fox: Thanks again!

 

He is the man behind The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark Hensley: I have worked in the audio post industry for 25 years as a re-recording mixer. In 2018 I recieved an Emmy for my work on Genius Picasso.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Mark Hensley: I honestly never thought about becoming a film maker until last year. After working in the film and TV industry for so long, I think I had a pretty good idea of what good content looks like.

SKSM: When did you make The man who loved flowers? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mark Hensley: We filmed The Man Who Loved Flower two weeks ago. The cost was pretty minimal, about $1000. We did a two day shoot, pulling a lot of favors from friends and film group cohorts.

SKSM: How come you picked The man who loved flowers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mark Hensley: The reason I picked this particular story is the minimal cast and the lack of special effects requirements. Also the story has a lot of room for interpretation. The original story works really well in print, but I think that critical story points gets lost when translated literally to film. I asked my wife Peggy, who is a writer to work on it, and she wrote an excellent adaptation.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Mark Hensley: I had read about this a few years ago and it stuck in my mind. When I got a bit more confident as a director I made the decision to pursue it.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mark Hensley: My wife laying in the alley as the dead body.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Mark Hensley: I hope all his fans get the chance to see it. We will be entering it festivals around the world. Hopefully Stephen King will create a depository for the dollar baby movies that everyone can access.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Mark Hensley: No reviews yet. It hasn’t been released yet.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Mark Hensley: Really any festival we can get into.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Mark Hensley: Yes, I am a big fan. I loved Carrie and Christine as well as The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile and of course Misery.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Mark Hensley: No personal contact. He hasn’t seen it yet, but I will certainly let you know when he does

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mark Hensley: We have no plans right now, but I would love to make Mile 81. I just really like the story. I think it is really creepy

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Mark Hensley: Right now I am producing a play and I am planning to start shooting the feature film version this winter.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Mark Hensley: I directed my first short last year after never having set foot on a set before. This one was my third.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mark Hensley: To all the fans out there, if you get the chance to see the film, I hope you enjoy it

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Mark Hensley: Anyone who wants to make a film, but thinks they can’t. Just do it.

She played in Dan Sellers’ Dollar Baby Uncle Otto’s Truck as The Narrator.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jenny Stencel: I’m a comedian and a mom.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Jenny Stencel: Since I was maybe 7 I knew I wanted to perform.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby film?

Jenny Stencel: Dan and Sammie approaches me about the movie and I had never read this particular story.

They send it over and I was like “Yes! When do we start?!”

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Jenny Stencel: The film was a lot of fun to make. The cast and crew are so talented and easy going. Lot of really wonderful teamwork.

Filming in a quasi abandoned house in the middle of summer was tough. It Was Hot!!!

SKSM: You worked with Dan Sellers on this film, how was that?

Jenny Stencel: I’d make another movie with this crew anytime!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jenny Stencel: I’ve been mostly running my comedy club, The Idiot Box since filming and performing standup.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jenny Stencel: Hm… I dunno if people are surprised about anything about me.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jenny Stencel: People are really fascinated with this film. Everyone wants to see it.

 

He is the man behind Rest Stop Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark Zimmerman: My name is Mark Zimmerman and I am from Sydney, Australia. I am a factory worker as my day job but in my spare time I write script’s and Direct and dabble in a bit of acting as well.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Mark Zimmerman: Well I’ve always been a writer for as long as I can as I can remember, I was 10 when I wrote my first short story and it developed from there onwards and at the age of 16 I wanted to become an actor. But it was at the age of 19 when I first saw 2001 a space odyssey that this was the path I wanted to take. So I started writing screenplays and studied film making by watching many different type of films and even doing short courses in Australia and New York.

SKSM: When did you make Rest stop? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mark Zimmerman: Rest Stop was produced over a space of 2 months in April and May 2019. We shot it on weekends when cast and crew were available, so I was working around that and council permits where we shot at the actual Rest Stop area. The budget was very low around the $2,500 dollar mark, I wish I had more but we made do with what we had and made a solid 18 min short.

SKSM: How come you picked Rest stop to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mark Zimmerman: I picked Rest Stop cause it was about a man who was pulled out of his comfort zone and confronted with a situation, which of course he couldn’t face but his alter ego and that was something that stood out to me. It also had a bit of “DARK HALF” elements about it which is one of my favorite King book and Film adaptation.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Mark Zimmerman: Funny enough I stumbled across the dollar babies via facebook on a Stephen King fan page and I did a bid of research on it and thought I’d give it a shot not expecting anything and 3 days after I sent the request I received the contract, I was blown away. I never thought I’d have an opportunity to adapt a Stephen King story, especially for $1, but here we are.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mark Zimmerman: Well it was funny now, but at the time it wasn’t. The first night of shooting which was April we had a massive cold front coming in and gail force winds and the night was freezing. We managed to get most of the car scenes and the fight scenes done, then we went to lunch and during lunch the council decided to turn the lights off and that was the beginning of multiple phone calls and more freezing conditions. After 30 min’s I decided to pull the plug and reschedule, which of course the cast and crew where happy with. These things happen and you can not control the weather and the council were a pain, but we battled on and get the film made.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Mark Zimmerman: It’s a little disappointing, but I hop and this is an idea and I hope the right person is reading this, we can do a 3 volume DVD/bluray collection of the dollar baby films produced, they can be sold and proceeds can go to a charity of Stephen King’s choice. That way the world and his fans can see everyone’s talent. At the end of the day were not here to make money but just getting the opportunity to adapt a King story is a massive achievement in itself.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Mark Zimmerman: So far only a handful of people have gotten back to me saying the film is strong and passes the message through well. I’ve had a few say it is well shot, written and acted and a nice thriller. No negatives yet, but if there is any I can take it on the chin, nobody is perfect.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Mark Zimmerman: I’m on film freeway which most of my pervious films have been entered in many festivals on that site, so I am searching of the right ones and also the next Dollar babies festivals in the U.S of course when ever that may be.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Mark Zimmerman: I am a huge Stephen King fan, his earlier works are masterpieces, Pet Sematary, IT, The Stand, Dark Half, Misery, Carrie, The Shining, Salems Lot. My Favorite book is Dark Half and the film adaptation is my favorite that and The Shining. It’s hard to pinpoint just one.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Mark Zimmerman: I haven’t had person contact with Stephen King yet, would love to one day, I’ve sent him the DVD of the film still waiting his thought’s. Fingers crossed.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mark Zimmerman: I would love to do another Stephen King adaptation, I would chose one of his novels and the one I would pick would be ROSE MADDER, cause it centers around escaping violent situation only to be dragged into a world of mythology and magic and more blood shed. It doesn’t matter how far you can escape the past will catch up with you unless you make a stand. It’s is his least popular works, but I enjoyed it.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Mark Zimmerman: I am working on a feature script at the moment, a psychological horror story. Can’t say too much now as it is in it’s early stages but I’m looking forward to when it is brought to life.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Mark Zimmerman: Well, there isn’t really anything surprising about me, I live the normal everyday life, I’m just waiting for my big break whenever that may be.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mark Zimmerman: Yeah, keep reading, writing and making fantastic film’s and don’t give up on your dreams. Remember King lived in poverty for year’s and did give up, but thank god for Tabitha for fishing Carrie out of the trash basket, cause we would have no KING.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Mark Zimmerman: I hope I get to see the other Dollar baby film’s. The one thing I love about the facebook page is that everyone is supportive of one another and do not judge, and that is amazing, two thumbs up everyone hope to meet you all one day. Take care.

 

He played in Dan Sellers’ Dollar Baby Uncle Otto’s Truck as The Barber.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Sammie Cassell: My name is Sammie Cassell,  I’m 49 years old (cool fact, I was born 2 hours after Jimi Hendrix was pronounced dead), I’m vice-President of Wreak Havoc Productions, a local NC actor, an actor at the Original Hollywood Horror Show haunted house and a comic book enthusiast

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor? 

Sammie Cassell: There was a casting call on a local haunt page looking for volunteers to play zombies in a short film (Dan’s Hank vs the Undead). It was our 13th wedding anniversary so my wife, our college age daughter, one of her friends and I went. I met Dan briefly there. He cast me in a speaking part as “The Hobo” and we became fast friends and production partners and I was hooked on acting and producing from there on out.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby film?

Sammie Cassell: Dan and I were involved in a dollar baby that didn’t get off the ground a couple of years ago. I think that planted the seed for him. Unbeknownst to me, he started doing research and last year he came to me and said “let’s do a dollar baby”.  I asked which one and, he told me Uncle Otto’s Truck. I picked up my personal copy of Skeleton Crew (a 1st edition) and read it the next day.  I went back to Dan and said this is doable, but if it’s going to be in front of Stephen King it’s got to be done right.  So we started pre-production. A little later he told me that he needed someone over the top to play the barber and that fit me to a tee.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Sammie Cassell: Stephen King haha, it’s a tried and true King story. He’s got a thing about cars. From Christine to Hearts in Atlantis to From a Buick 8 to Maximum Overdrive, whatever his deal is with cars, it’s fueled his writing. To all our benefit. I’m not a huge car guy but Kings stories resonate with me. Christine is one of my favorite books and movies of all time. He’s just an amazing storyteller and Otto is a good one. Plus, it’s the only dollar baby set in Castle Rock. And that’s huge right now.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Sammie Cassell: Haha I hope not. I get a role in every film we do. Although sometimes I have to lobby for it. This one, Dan had me in mind for.

SKSM: You worked with Dan Sellers on this film, how was that?

Sammie Cassell: Dan and I have become best friends.  We collaborate on almost everything. He writes and directs, I produce and act. I’ve found I have a knack for producing.  I found the house and the truck through people I know. We’ve since brought some very talented and diverse people into our circle that we like and trust. There’s a great little group now, and we enjoy making films. Dan and I don’t always agree, but we always know where each other stands, and that’s important in any relationship.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Sammie Cassell: We always try to keep a light and fun set. We pick and carry on until it’s time to work. Jeff Cochran (one of the other producers) and I were cleaning some brush off. We both had these big machetes, I always carry a pocket knife. Dan normally does too, along with Chad Hunt, another collaborator. Well, Jeff and I walk by a van to put our machetes up and sitting in the van is Jennie, our lead actress studying her lines. She’s a city girl, and we’re in the middle of the mountains. She’s cracks the window just a bit and says “Why does everyone have weapons?” Lol. I said, because we may see critters, to which she said “That many?” haha. There are snakes and bears and raccoons, and all sorts of things up there. We needed protection. Another fun aspect was Nelson Hill. His truck, Festus, is the real star.  Festus is legit creepy, and we treated him like a real person.  Nelson appreciated it I think and he stuck with us the entire time.  And was entertaining himself.  I’ve know Nelson almost all my life.  His daughter and I are the same age.  We had fun that weekend.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Sammie Cassell: Well, with social media it’s easier, but yea. Most everyone was a friend or someone we’ve worked with frequently. Jennie was really the only outsider, but we all stay in touch. North Carolina has a very close knit film community

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Sammie Cassell: I’ve been doing some background exttras stuff. I worked on the new Halloween movie, Halloween Kills.  I’ve worked on the untitled Walking Dead spin-off.  Next spring, I’ve got a role in one feature called Can You Smell the Flowers, another one called Dark Trepidation 3 (I had a role in 2), and a small role in Killer Babes and the Frightening Film Fiasco from Brett Mullen. Other than that, I’m on the festival circuit promoting Uncle Otto, a short drama from writer/director Zack Fox (cinematographer on Otto) called Sea, Salt, Wind that we produced, and films that I’ve acted in, It’s All Fun and Games and Silent Breath and debuting in 2020, the brilliant feature Kill Giggles from Jaysen Buterin. I try to stay busy. And this is my hobby haha

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Sammie Cassell: I love Stephen King. My first year in high school, I came home after the last day of school and went to my room. There was a note from my mom that said, “I know you’ve got a summer reading list from school, but I’m giving you one too. Under that note was King’s Pet Semetary. The next year it was Christine, then IT, and it took off from there.  I devoured every King book I could.  IT is my favorite novel ever! I also really like The Stand and Cujo. I also really like most of the films. Especially The Shawshank Redemption (look for an Easter egg in Otto), the new IT, and The Shining.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Sammie Cassell: I’m also known as Sammie the Comic Book Man. I go around to schools, libraries, senior centers, wherever and do presentations encouraging people to read, specifically comic books. Every kid leaves with two books, gender based. It’s basically a show and tell. I do a section on how a comic is made, real history in comics, women creators, and when comics were almost banned.  It’s a passion project for me, and Dan did a documentary about it a while back. That’s my heart up on a screen and I’m forever indebted to him for it.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Sammie Cassell: Please check out our stuff. It’s all on social media. Like, share, all that good stuff.  We also do a podcast about movies called the Wreak Havoc Film Buffs Podcast.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Sammie Cassell: Thank you so much for giving us this outlet to promote Otto. We’re really proud of it and it’s already won 3 awards. We hope we do Mr King proud.

 

He is the man behind Mute Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Rob Darren: My name is Rob Darren  I’m a writer, producer and director. I was born a Navy brat in San Diego California. So I’ve lived in several places during my lifetime including: California, Virginia, Colorado, New York, Indiana, Nevada, and North Carolina.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Rob Darren: I have chased the dream for nearly ten years. It became an obsession after I wrote, produced, and directed my first independent film “White Paint: A Clown Story” The entire process  remains a thrill no matter the size or scope of the film production. I began working on the film sets of “Evan Almighty” and “John Adams” I was amazed watching Academy Award winning director Tom Hooper work his magic on “John Adams”. I was fortunate to be the AD (assistant director) on Ted V Mikels “Astro Zombies M3: Cloned”. Mikels was a filmmaker of 65 years and largely through him that I learned about the art of cinema.

SKSM: When did you make Mute? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Rob Darren: I started adapting the script in February 2018 and went into pre-production. We finished principle photography in June 2018. We put together an amazing crew and some very talented actors.. This was a team effort and everyone went above and beyond to make Mute a great film. We filmed over the course of 3 days and nights in Las Vegas Nevada in various locations with a budget of $6000.

SKSM: How come you picked Mute to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Rob Darren: The ending of this story is unexpected and the characters are special. The story keeps you guessing . Mute has a strong comedic tone despite it being a thriller. I wanted to bring both the comedy and suspense elements through the story. It was feasible to shoot on a limited budget.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Rob Darren: I found out accidentually on the internet.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Rob Darren: During the desert scene the camera was mounted to the hood of the car. My DP and I waited for the car to return. We thought it had fallen off, There was an issue and the actor put it in the car without us knowing at first. Scary frantic momento.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Rob Darren: I understand why Stephen King doesn’t want these films released for profit, The honor of being able to use a King story is worth it. In the future I hope everyone can watch “Mute”.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Rob Darren: They all have been very positive, especially the clever easter eggs dropped throughout the movie.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Rob Darren: We are planning on submitting to several festivals.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Rob Darren: Yes I am a fan. He has so many films based off his books. “The Shawshank Redemption”, “Salems Lot”, “It”, and my personal favorite “The Shining”.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Rob Darren: I’ve been dealing with his manager. He has not seen it due to my editor at Gazing Cat Productions polishing it up.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Rob Darren: I would love to shoot  “All that you Love will be Carried Away” Its a dark story similar to Mute and very character driven.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Rob Darren: I produced and directed my first feature “White Paint: A Clown Story”. Also was the assistant director of Ted V. Mikels “Astro Zombies M3: Cloned”. I also wrote a Laurel and Hardy feature that was accepted by Creative Artists Agency. I hope to film that someday. Also would like to create a series similar to the Twlight Zone and show works from independent students, guest directors and eventually Hollywood directors. I also to make documentaries on the presciption drug industry and Antartica, which are very personal to me.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Rob Darren: I was a dear friend of Hollywood icon Tony Curtis.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Rob Darren: Thank you for interviewing me. It has been a pleasure.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Rob Darren: I would love to develop Mute into a feature film. The characters are rich and the story can all be developed further. It can truly be a modern Hitchcock type film. I want to thank my amazing actors, great crew and everyone who helped make this posible.

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