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Title: The boogeyman (1982) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 28′
Director: Jeff Schiro (Read interview)
Script: Jeff Schiro
Cast: Michael Reid, Bert Linder, Terence Brandis. Mandy Silverman
Trailer
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He is the man behind All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark Montalto: My name is Mark Montalto. Originally from Rhinebeck, NY (upstate a little bit), I now live in Manhattan. I’m a recent gradute from the film/animation/video dept. at Rhode Island School of Design, in Providence, RI.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Mark Montalto: I guess a friend had mentioned it to me at some point. After that, I did a little research on it (mostly on this website and others like it) and also, I spoke with James Renner about how the process actually works. James was just finishing his version of “All That You Love” as I was getting ready to shoot mine.

SKSM: How come you picked All That You Love Will Be Carried Away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mark Montalto: I always liked that story. I first read it a while ago in high school, around the time I 1st picked up the Dark Tower books I think. When the 7th and final Dark Tower book came out, all of my roomates and I were huge into King again and thats when I went back and read “All That You Love”. At the time, I was trying to write a script for my FAV degree project, but I was at the point where I had to start shooting in a few weeks and I was nowhere near done with my own script. I remember thinking I could write and re-write my own script forever and never be happy with it, and theres a great story right here in front of me. Thats when i decided to shoot ATYL.

SKSM: When did you make All That You Love Will Be Carried Away? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mark Montalto: And so, a couple of weeks later (winter ’05), I had a shooting script all ready, and began casting for Alfie and looking for locations. The story is set in Nebraska so I was hard pressed to find areas the looked similar enough. I actually ended up using Google Earth (Keyhole at the time) to find a big field outside of Providence. I used a Panasonic AGDVX-100 that I checked out from the school, with mostly natural lighting. None of the actors that came to audition were perfect and i ended up using a friend of a friend, Jack Roach (who actually used to be a salesman) for the part. It probably cost me a few hundred bucks to make the movie. Mostly for gas, a few miniDV tapes and renting the motel room… they wouldnt let me shoot for free! Actually they wouldnt let me shoot at all .. i had to try to sneak it.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mark Montalto: Oh probably blowing all the electricity in the motel with our lighting… or Jack shoving onions up his nose for the final scene where Alfie is supposed to be crying. It didnt end up looking all that real anyway.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd release would be possible?

Mark Montalto: Oh god… I don’t if they will wanna see my movie… But in case they do, Im working on getting DVDs copies made.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)? Mark Montalto: Nah, no personal contact. And I doubt he’s seen it. I’m not even entirely sure i bought the rights to it. I was in contact with his office and they asked me to send the script with a scheck for a dollar. I was supposed to receive something signed in return, i beleive, but i never got it. After that I just went ahead and made the movie. I’d love to follow up on that and maybe i could show it around at some point… I just havent yet.

SKSM: What do you think of the other three versions of “All That You Love Will Be Carried Away”?

Mark Montalto: The only other one I’ve seen is James Renner’s. He was nice enough to send me a copy of his version, and of his script to get ideas for my version. I thought it was really good, and I’m so jealous that he got Joe Bob Briggs and Harvey Pekar. What the hell?! I look forward to seeing the others.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mark Montalto: At the moment, no. Id love to do something with the Dark Tower books, but i just dont think it could be done… especially as a movie. Maaaaaybe as a miniseries or something. . . but doubtful. But if it could be, Id do that.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mark Montalto: Go do something else, now that you’ve wasted 5 minutes reading all this. I mean you could have made a five minute movie just then! and thanks!
-Mark A Montalto

 

She played in James Renner’s Dollar Baby All That You Love as the Housewife.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Rebecca Wilde: I am Rebecca Wilde and I co-host a morning show on Cleveland’s Q104. I am a single female, who owns a house in the Heights, with my two cats, Holyfield and Van gogh……they are both missing part of their ears.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away?

Rebecca Wilde: Local writer/director James Renner call me up and asked if I would be interested in a bit part in the flick.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Rebecca Wilde: I don’t think it was written for me, but I didn’t have to audition.

SKSM: You worked with James Renner on this film, how was that?

Rebecca Wilde: James is awesome! He makes people completely at ease. I think that shows a great director because he’s easy to get direction from.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Rebecca Wilde: It wasn’t really funny, but I felt really cool having a cigarette with Joe Bob Briggs, the star of the movie. I used to watch him on TNT all the time……..btw, I quit smoking almost 2 years ago.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Rebecca Wilde: Just James……..I’m sure Joe Bob couldn’t pick me out of a line-up.

SKSM: What did you do after All That You Love Will Be Carried Away?

Rebecca Wilde: Went back to the simple life of anonymity…..at least visually. Still on the air.

SKSM: There are four different adaptations of this story. What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Rebecca Wilde: Stephen King just has a way of pulling people into his stories. Maybe it’s because the guy is totally relatable……..he’s just a regular guy looking for who knows what and I think a lot of people are always looking for something or someone to fulfill them.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Rebecca Wilde: LOVE him!! Used to read the scary books to my brother, even as we got older and we would scare the crap out of each other.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Rebecca Wilde: Sure………I’m available for work! Haha……

He played in Peter Sullivan’s Dollar Baby Night Surf as Alvin (Burning Man).

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jack Erdie: I’m a reformed actor! I haven’t acted in anything for more than three years. I’m from a small town in West Virginia. I wanted to be an actor. Pittsburgh seemed like a good place to get more experience before moving to New York or Los Angeles. I acted here for eight or nine years, had a principle role in a Van Damme vehicle called Sudden Death, then moved to Los Angeles. I didn’t get many film opportunities in L.A. Then I played Dracula in a play that was horribly directed, really a sad joke. I gave up acting. Since returning to Pittsburgh, I’ve been pursuing a career as a singer-songwriter, and so far I’ve gotten a lot of local recognition. I’ve
been with the same woman, Camille, for twelve years. We have one dog and two cats.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Night Surf?

Jack Erdie: I had worked with Peter Sullivan on a short film in Pittsburgh. I forget
what it was and in which capacity he served. He remembered me. When he came out to Los Angeles, we had mutual friends there, all of whom had moved West from Pittsburgh. We reconnected through those friends. He told me about the role and asked me to do it.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Jack Erdie: I don’t think I had to audition. The role was directly from the Stephen King short story, so it wasn’t written for me.

SKSM: You worked with Peter Sullivan on this film, how was that?

Jack Erdie: Peter was very capable. Young, and very mature for his age. He was focused and I knew I was in good hands. There was no petty squabbling. He gave me good, useful suggestions.

SKSM: Where there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jack Erdie: I brought a hermetically sealed vial of amber fluid onto the set and began telling people it was a supposedly inactive strand of the bubonic plague virus that I’d stolen while working for the Center for Disease Control. said I was going to drink it to try to make the role very real. A couple crew members freaked out, but Peter was smart enough to know it wasa joke.

SKSM: What did you do after Night Surf?

Jack Erdie: I did a few plays, and a few student films. I’ve only seen one of the films. I was with a theater group that Jason Patric and Amy Jo Johnson came out of for a while.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Jack Erdie: As I was getting ready to leave Los Angeles, one of the people involved with Night Surf told me they were writing a movie with a role they intended me to play. I told them, okay, when you get the go-ahead from a studio, and the money, fly me back and I’ll do it! I never heard from them again.

SKSM: Night Surf is a prequel to The Stand. Have you read/seen The Stand and what do you think of it?

Jack Erdie: I saw the mini-series of The Stand. I loved Gary Sinise. I thought it was a bizarre blend of supernatural and pandemic thriller. The plague is frightening enough. The devil, for me, only made it silly.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jack Erdie: I read a lot of Stephen King’s books when I was in high school. That’s not to say I wouldn’t enjoy them now, but I happened to go through my Stephen King binge way back when. Salem’s Lot had a profound effect on me. So did The Shining. I think Mr. King has one of the most expansive and fascinating imaginations of our age. More recently, I read his book On Writing, and found it direct, helpful, informative, and humorous. I’m always interested to see what he’s done lately.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jack Erdie: If any of you grow up to be movie directors, consider me for any particulary bizarre roles. And thanks for taking the time to read this.
Sincerely,
Jack Erdie (www.jackerdie.com)

 

He played in Jack Sawyers’ Dollar Baby Gotham Cafe as Guy.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Cullen Douglas: Cullen Douglas actor/writer… with these looks, I’ve been a 40 year old character actor since I was 20. Current Projects – HBO’s Deadwood – actor. Stone Soup – an hour long television drama creator/writer (in development)

SKSM: How did you become involved in Gotham Cafe?

Cullen Douglas: My manager at the time urged me to read the script.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Cullen Douglas: I read for the role. Before I went in for the audition I listened to Stephen King’s audio book Lunch at the Gotham Cafe, to get a true sense of the tone and “the voice.”

SKSM: You worked with Jack Sawyers on this film, how was that?

Cullen Douglas: Jack was wonderful – very encouraging, very open to ideas – yet he knew what he wanted and how to get it done in the short time we had to shoot.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Cullen Douglas: Julie Sands – the films producer and lead also served as the casting director. Yet she did it in disguise as to not intimidate the actors who would be reading opposite her. She kept up the charade until after I was cast and revealed to me, over the phone that she and the casting director were one in the same! Only in Hollywood.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Cullen Douglas: I do occasionally bump into Chaney – we both have appeared on FX’s The Sheild.

SKSM: What did you do after Gotham Cafe?

Cullen Douglas: I’ve been very busy as of late. Gotham Cafe was some wonderful exposure in a role that only Stephen King could dream up.

SKSM: Stephen King did an audio cameo in this movie. It is the first time King ever did a cameo in a dollar baby. Did you meet King in person for this, or was the cameo recorded in another way?

Cullen Douglas: n/a

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Cullen Douglas: Yes… and still am, even after being the “guy” everyone loves to hate.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Cullen Douglas: Thanks for reading my ramblings –

 

He is the man behind King’s short story Suppr..

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Nicolas Heurtel: I’m a “little” frenchie of 27 years old and the Cinema is a great passion to me… so I gave up my studies in architecture to study film making at the university 3 years ago. This is where I met some good friends, and we finaly created a little team, and we made all of ours movies together. We made about 6 short, all amaters, “suppr.” being the last on the list, made in June 2005. My first “professionnal” short is in project, I’m the script and director and I just have to find… some money !

SKSM: How come you picked Wordprocessor of the Gods(Suppr.) to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Nicolas Heurtel: The first reason is that I’m a great fan of SK since I’m 13 ! The first book of SK I read was “The long walk” and it really impressed me, I never read something like that before. Since then, I read all of his books. So, I naturally feel the need to adapt one of his novel, but few are easy to adapt, for amaters like us… “Wordprocessor of gods” is a part of those who were conceivable, in one condition, rewrite the story to create an “evil” character, a twin evil which could come right from “Secret window” and so create some difficulty, cause without difficulty, there’s no story to tell.

The second reason is that we hadn’t much time to do it, we all were very tired by our previous movie which took us 2 months (a 45 minutes movie !) so it was a kind of recreation to make a “little” movie of 15 minutes ^^ And it’s very interresting to work on the adaptation of an existing work.

SKSM: When did you make Wordprocessor of the Gods(Suppr.)? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Nicolas Heurtel: It’s a complete non-professional project, because we were students. A member of the team wrote a first version of the script… and the four of us gave our ideas. After that, I modified this first version, to make everyone pleased, including our teacher, cause it was at first place a work for university! The second part was to find unpaid actors. As we were in Paris, there are several ways: theatre schools, associations which give some catalogs of professionals and non professional actors (with resume and pictures of them). So we took an afternoon to note some names and give some calls to know if they were interested with the project. We were lucky, we found pretty quickly, so in 2 or 3 weeks, we had a script and actors we casted.

After that, we transformed a friend’s cellar into an office. Another member of the group made the machine. The shooting take 2 days : 1 in the office, an other for the scene in the kitchen and the sitting room, in the house of an other friend. We had to do it very quickly. We took an afternoon to record the off-voices at the university.

We then did the cutting and special effects in 2 or 3 weeks (cause we had exams and class, we couldn’t work on it very often).

The movie didn’t cost anything, except some pizzas !

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Nicolas Heurtel: There are always funny moments, but as we haven’t much time and lot to do, we try to stay serious during the shooting! In fact, there was something rather funny… In the basic script, the man has a son (as in the original novel) but we finished the shooting day with this boy and it was too late, so the boy couldn’t come. Finally, after some phone calls, we found a girl to replace him, the sister of a friend of somebody in the team (rather complicated eh?)

Something else: the journalist we can see at TV is a real journalist but also the most famous of the TV news presenter in France, he gathered more the half of the TV viewers! We got something like 3 minutes to shoot with him! We were really exited he was okay to participate.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd release would be possible?

Nicolas Heurtel: It’s very pleasant to see that ideas, drawings, texts and movies can freely circulate… and that they have a life on the Internet! I was surprised when you contacted me to ask some questions! I really happy to share what I do and what I love with other people… this is generaly the reason to make cinema ^^

And to have a beautiful copy of the movie, it will take some time but we’ll do it… we are rewriting subtitles and after that we should be able to burn it on a DVD or send it directly on the Internet.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Nicolas Heurtel: No! I would be pretty ashamed to show him this movie cause the script is too much confuse! And this is more a tribute to King than an adaptation (for instance in the drawing of the credits at the beginning of the film, we can read “Castle Rock” and see “Christine” in front of “Le bazaar des rêves” (NEEDFUL THINGS)… or the complete collection of King’s books on the shelves of writer’s shelves…) and I don’t think that would interest him… but if you know him personally, just tell him I’m very interested to adapt some of his books!!!

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Nicolas Heurtel: No, for the moment, I don’t have other projects, cause, like I said earlier, it’s not easy to adapt King, specially without money ! But sure, there are stories I would like to adapt, like “The long walk”… I read it regularly and really think it could be a great movie !

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Nicolas Heurtel: I just want to thank you for the interest you showed for my work. And, hum… Cheers to Stephen King !

He played in Shawn Lealos’s Dollar Baby I Know What You Need as Shane.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Robert McIlrath: My name is Robert McIlrath, I am 26 years old and currently reside in Norman, OK, USA. I am an actor and producer, working mainly with the company that I started with Shawn Lealos, Starving Dogs Productions.

SKSM: How did you become involved in I Know What You Need?

Robert McIlrath: Shawn found out about the Dollar Baby movies that Mr. King allows student filmmakers to make and I thought it would be a great film to produce. The best part of making I Know What You Need is not only is it a work of Mr. King’s, but it is a great showcase for student and independent filmmakers. This particular film not only showcased the great actors we had, but also Shawn’s ability to adapt a story into a screenplay.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Robert McIlrath: This role was written for me for two reasons. 1. I have a bad case of the acting bug, and love to be in anything I can. 2. Shawn really wanted build more character depth in the story, therefore he add this character into the story to help Alice in her search about Edward.

SKSM: You worked with Shawn Lealos on this film, how was that?

Robert McIlrath: Shawn is an amazing director to work with. As an actor, he is very patient and understanding, while still being firm on what he sees as the character. As a producer, he makes working alot of fun. He has such an artistic vision when he steps behind the camera, and doesn’t settle for any thing less.

SKSM: Where there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Robert McIlrath: The funniest thing about the movie was Kevin Real. Kevin played Edward in the movie, and was so into the character, that he would start to scare people when he didn’t break character.

SKSM: What did you do after I Know What You Need?

Robert McIlrath: I’ve kept very busy since I Know What You Need. We have made three more films since the completion of IKWYN, where I have pulled double duty by producing and acting.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Robert McIlrath: Of course I talk to Shawn on a daily basis. I also try to keep in touch with Kevin Real and Colin Warde. They are both great actors and I look forward to working with them again, hopefully on our first feature film at the end of 2006.

SKSM: Voodoo is an important part of the story. Do you believe in it, or did you have personal experience with voodoo?

Robert McIlrath: I have not had any experiences with voodoo, but would like to learn more about it. I try to keep an open mind about everything, I just have never had any dealings with it.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Robert McIlrath: I am a very big fan of Mr. King’s. I think he is one of the most intelligent writers of all time and I think his accomplishments speak for themselves. My personal favorite is It, book and movie.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Robert McIlrath: I just hope everyone that had a chance to see the movie liked it, and now that we a score completed, I hope more people get a chance to see it. We will be sending IKWYN to many more film festivals in the upcoming months and will try to keep everyone posted.

 

He played in Shawn Lealos’s Dollar Baby I Know What You Need as Tony.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Colin Warde: Since early 2005 I’ve been working behind the camera in production, usually as a production assistant, but frequently in art department on feature films and television in Oklahoma and Los Angeles. Before that I wrote a novel and I write whenever I’m not working on a show. I’ve been in LA four months and have just got my headshots so I’ll be looking for representation before I start my next crew gig.

SKSM: How did you become involved in I Know What You Need?

Colin Warde: I worked at Speeding Bullet Comics in Norman, Oklahoma (United States) and Shawn Lealos who directed the short came in to talk to the owner about doing a movie in the café that is part of the shop. I was referred to Shawn by my boss Matt Price because I was taking technical film classes at Oklahoma City Community College at the time and acting almost weekly in front of a couple of classes.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Colin Warde: I didn’t have to audition. Shawn needed me to do replace an actor who was unavailable for re-shoots due to sound problems I believe. Because the production was small and professional contacts in that part of the country are limited a lot of student projects and shorts are put together based on who is readily available like other students and friends. I’m sure the part was written for whoever had experience enough to fill the role. I happened to be lucky enough that it came along while I was available to work.

SKSM: You worked with Shawn Lealos on this film, how was that?

Colin Warde: Shawn is very motivated to get his work seen and off the ground. He has a network of supporting friends and interested parties who lend aid any way they can. No director can be the full energy of the crew no matter how small it is. He is just starting out and comes from a great part of the United States where people are perfectly willing to help one another and not confined by union rules. There is a bit of trial and error, there are personalities to deal with even in Oklahoma, there are money issues, when can people work? All these things become problems if you don’t have a solid producer who can manage these issues. Shawn can do it. He knows what he wants to get out of his crew and cast, and through his personality, his cooperative attitude, he gets it.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Colin Warde: Lots of things were fun and some of it translated onto the screen. My co-star Kevin gave me a lot to work with during our scene when we shook hands and he sort of wiped his hand off mine rather than give me a strong, sturdy handshake. It made for some laughs after the take and every time we watch it.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Colin Warde: Shawn and I talk on MySpace frequently and we worked on another promotional piece several months later with a lot of ground to cover due to a more ambitious script. I’m looking forward to catching up with Shawn when next I am in Oklahoma.

SKSM: What did you do after I Know What You Need?

Colin Warde: I worked on “I Know What You Need” over a weekend and then immediately joined the art department for the feature film “Surveillance” starring Armand Assante, directed by Fritz Kiersch through Graymark Productions. It was filmed in Oklahoma City and actually had its theatrical release there this week. Since then I worked on another film in October with Graymark Productions, “Soul’s Midnight” and most recently on a CBS TV pilot in Los Angeles called “3lbs.”

SKSM: Voodoo is an important part of the story. Do you believe in it, or did you have personal experience with voodoo?

Colin Warde: I have never experienced voodoo. It’s not something I like to think about. I don’t understand it because I’ve never studied it, it makes me uncomfortable. The closest I come to it would be the original form of zombies which I gather are from the Caribbean also. I enjoy zombie movies. I believe in a lot of things that people find superstitious, I don’t like to shut out the likelihood that anything exists. It’s best to be open minded, I don’t have to agree with everything, but I can respect anyone’s opinion.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Colin Warde: Oh, I really think that The Stand is probably my favorite book of all time. It’s such an American epic. The journey goes on and on, the characters are so well rounded, and it builds at its own pace like a good book ought to. I read it just after high school and at one point had to put it down because the revulsion I felt for one of the characters was so overwhelming. Six months later I started dreaming about the collapse of civilization as we know it and trying to survive the first months of an event like the plague just long enough to get away from all the craziness that would be associated to it and then escape to relative personal safety. I had to finish the book after that and I’ve read it twice since then.
I owe a lot to Stephen King due to his style because it’s so honest. I love his opinion columns in Entertainment Weekly. I frequently turn to the back to read that first. I also love his pseudo autobiography, “On Writing,” because it cleared up a lot of things for me while I was writing my own novel and grounds me every time I sit down to write. I always hear a little Stephen King voice in my head saying, “ignore the TV and the internet while I’m typing, work for a solid amount of time, nothing has to be perfect the first time,” and so many other things. I really appreciate that book.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Colin Warde: I have worked on a fair amount of film and video since I started only a year and a half ago. Before I worked with Shawn I worked with another friend who shares the same motivation to make movies, his name is Damon Blalack. Motivation and inherent talent are what gets us where we need to go in movies and writing. If it’s really something you want to get out there then you have to do it. Maybe you have to take some classes to learn how, maybe you have to make a piece of junk before you make an Academy Award winning feature, maybe you have to have a vision and rely on a crew to get it together. Stephen King gave everyone the opportunity to make movies out of his short stories because I think he understands motivation. That’s what the Dollar Babies are all about. Hollywood can afford to throw out loads of bad movies because they have the money, but independent producers and student filmmakers can’t do that, they have to have an excellent script from the beginning because they can’t have major stars and explosions that attract audiences. Stephen King gives us the opportunity to make something around a great story.

She is the woman behind Tijger Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Leyla Everaers: My name is Leyla Everaers and I study for Director at the Dutch film Academy in Amsterdam. Before I started this study, I have studied Audiovisual Design in Rotterdam for four years. I live in Amsterdam with my cat Britney and I’ll be 25 in a couple of weeks.

SKSM: When did you make Tijger(Here There Be Tygers)? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Leyla Everaers: In my previous study we had to make a couple of illustrations based on the story ‘Here There Be Tygers’. It’s a very visual story, like all King-stories. The illustrations have been in my drawer for about five years, and all this time I hoped to be able to make a movie out of it. While producing a movie in my third year of study, me and my crew got stuck after five months. I came up with the idea of ‘Here There Be Tygers’, and luckily the writer of the screenplay, Femke Boon, and producer Rozemarijn in ’t Veld liked the idea too. Three weeks later we had a finished script.

There are a couple of rules for making movies on the academy. Everyone gets the same amount of shooting days, the same amount of editing time, and the same amount of money (except for final exam movies, they have a larger budget because of sponsoring). We have shot the film in five days in January and February. We had three months of pre-production. Producer Rozemarijn and her team worked very hard, and while shooting the movie everything was prepared very good. We postproduced the movie for two weeks, and after that the movie was sent to a Visual Effects studio. They worked on ‘our’ tiger for three more months there. We’re still working on the sound, but the movie will probably be finished in July.

SKSM: How come you picked Here There Be Tygers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Leyla Everaers: The best part of the story is the magical realism that’s in it. Or what I think is in it. Personally, I don’t like realism, but the fun part of the movie is that you can loose yourself in another world for a while. Kings story is very suited for that. Making the movie was really great. Again, I didn’t expect this kind of attention. It was really weird to be asked when the movie was finished by strangers. I really like it that people are so interested. It’s also scares me, because King fans will have expectations I won’t be able to fulfill. I feel the same way with movies based on books.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Leyla Everaers: A special thing about the movie is the completely digitally created tiger. We discussed a real tiger, but we decided on a digital version. That works great, because we have control of everything the tiger does then. It was the first time for me with Visual Effects, and it has been great. You have to decide on things very early, and wait so long before you see the result. They finished the tiger last week, and it was definately worth the wait!

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Leyla Everaers: I hadn’t heard of the Dollar Baby deal until the postproduction. I knew all along I couldn’t screen the movie outside of the academy. I never intended to do so either. But all of a sudden we got media attention, and we were contacted by Stephen King Short Movies.

We haven’t decided whether we will buy the rights or not. The movie is a exercise, and since it hasn’t been finished yet we can’t tell whether it’s been a success or not. The most important thing is that I’ve learned a lot while making it, and I can use that knowledge when creating my final exam movie.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Leyla Everaers: No, I don’t have any other plans for doing more King movies. There are so many beautiful adaptations already! My favourite is ‘The Stand’. That one really impressed me. When I was a teenager, I read the book, and I really love the theme.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Leyla Everaers: Thanks for your interest! I really like to see people appreciate it that much without knowing what it will look like in the end…

Translated by Danny Paap of StephenKing.nl

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