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He played in Tyson Steigers’s Dollar Baby In The Cutting Room as Howard Randall Cottrell.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Eddie Eagle: “I’m mainly a voice actor these days although I’ve been in a number of commercials, short films and movies. I live in Washington state and also distribute new and used DVDs, CDs and Videogames. I moved to the Northwest from Chicago so I could windsurf more often in the Columbia River Gorge which is Mecca for windsurfers around the world. I’ve lived in many states here in the US and have traveled abroad.”

SKSM: How did you become involved in The Cutting Room?

Eddie Eagle: “I was cast into another project that Tyson did at the Art Institute of Portland. Tyson was getting ready to do In The Cutting Room after that project and liked what I did. So he contacted me asking if I would like to do the part. Being a real fan of horror, how could I say no? Well,… that answers question 2 and 3 🙂 ”

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Eddie Eagle:

SKSM: You worked with Tyson Steigers on this film, how was that?

Eddie Eagle: “Tyson was really organized and his crew was very familiar with the equipment (They shot with the Panasonic DVX100 at 24P) and had good experience so everything technical went very smooth and turned out looking great. He got that film look with shooting at 24P. As a director he was good with both the talent and the crew so everyone ultimately turned out great performances. He was able to communicate on many levels what he wanted and as an actor that always makes things easier and in the end… the movie speaks for itself. ”

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Eddie Eagle: We were working in a funerary services department at Mt. Hood Community College and the movie was shot in a real autopsy room. In the freezer was a cadaver of a lady whom the students at the school were prepping, so it was interesting, to say the least, having her there. Also the last part of the movie where the woman doctor realized I wasn’t dead when I got an erection was pretty funny. We had a prop to simulate it and we all got a good rise from it. ”

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Eddie Eagle: “I’ve emailed with Tyson a few times since. His last email to me was that he was heading to LA for a while to work on a few projects. I don’t know exactly what they are. I haven’t seen any of the rest of the cast or crew since the movie.”

SKSM: What did you do after The Cutting Room?

Eddie Eagle: “You can visit one of my webpages for some of my work. www.myspace.com/movietrailertrash Mostly commercials, videos, movie trailers and DVD release VO work. The internet has made it possible for me to do voiceover work from my home studio and upload audio to anywhere in the world. So if any of you need voice work let me know! :)”

SKSM: A new version of Autopsy Room Four is being made for the tv-series “Nightmares and Dreamscapes”. Are you excited about that?

Eddie Eagle: “Yeah, That sounds like it should be pretty good, I’d like to see another version. If that is the Canadian series, I’ve talked with some of the directors and writers before.”

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Eddie Eagle: “I’ve read Stephen’s work and watched more of his movies and stories than I’ve read. I’m a big horror fan and have been since I was a kid. My mom thought I watched far too many horror movies and thought I would turn into a werewolf or some kind of monster. Muhahahahahahaha! :)”

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Eddie Eagle: Thanks for watching the movie and asking me to do the interview. I hope you
see and hear more of me on the big and small screen as well as the radio and internet.

He played in James Renner‘s Dollar Baby All That You Love Will Be Carried Away as Alfie Zimmer.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Joe Bob Briggs: I’m the world’s greatest drive-in movie critic. That’s because I’m the world’s ONLY drive-in movie critic. I’ve been reviewing movies at drive-ins for more than 20 years, and I’ve also hosted late night movie shows on two American networks–The Movie Channel and TNT. I’ve written several books about film. The latest two are “Profoundly Disturbing: Shocking Movies That Changed History” and “Profoundly Erotic: Sexy Movies That Changed History.” I’ve done quite a bit of acting as well, in both big-budget and micro-budget projects.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away?

Joe Bob Briggs: I got a request from James Renner to do it. He had been talking to the director Mick Garris about his project, and Mick recommended me. Mick has done several Stephen King movies and I had worked for him on “The Stand.” I played a Texas highway patrolman in that Stephen King mini-series. Mick has been a friend for years and he told James that he could probably afford me!

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Joe Bob Briggs: No, there was no audition. James just said he could easily visualize me in the part and he wanted me to do it. It was not really written for me. James had read the short story when it originally appeared in The New Yorker magazine, and he thought “I was born to direct this story.” He just loved the story, and he had worked out a script based on it.

SKSM: You worked with James Renner on this film, how was that?

Joe Bob Briggs: James was great to work with. I thought the film relied too heavily on the voiceover narration, so I suggested some dialogue scenes, and we incorporated most of them into the film. He ran a smooth and efficient set.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Joe Bob Briggs: I was terrified of Harvey Pekar. He made me nervous. (He played the motel clerk.) The very first time we did the scene, he was perfect, he was himself, he was very natural. When we finished the rehearsal, he was already bored with it, though, and kept wondering why we had to do it more than once. The reason we had to do it more than once is that we were rehearsing. This was explained. Of course there was more than one camera angle and a travelling shot, and so we had to do it several more times, and each time he became more resentful and bored. I don’t know which take was used, but I would assume a very very early one. By the end he seemed to be in full revolt against the process.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Joe Bob Briggs: Well, James Renner lets me know whenever the film is shown at a festival. And I’m in touch with Charles Moore, who was the assistant director and also played the character of the other travelling salesman.

SKSM: What did you do after All That You Love Will Be Carried Away?

Joe Bob Briggs: I’ve acted in three horror films as well as done a lot of magazine writing.

SKSM: There are four different adaptations of this story. What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Joe Bob Briggs: Well, I think it’s very poignant, about the way people slowly drive themselves crazy, through social isolation and the pursuit of profit. It’s uncharacteristic for Stephen King. It’s a powerful commentary on the modern world.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Joe Bob Briggs: Yes, I’ve been a fan for years. He was the guest of honor at a film festival I sponsored in Dallas in the early eighties. The World Drive-In Movie Festival and Custom Car Rally–Big Steve stood up on top of the concession stand and accepted the Lifetime Achievement Award.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Joe Bob Briggs: The drive-in will never die! (www.joebobbriggs.com)

He is the man behind All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Anthony Kaneaster: I am a vocal performance major at UCI. I am basically a full time student who tires to make movies on his spare time.

SKSM: When did you make All That You Love Will Be Carried Away? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Anthony Kaneaster: “All that you Love” was actually a semester long project that I completed in my senior year of high school. I basically did all of it on my own. I wrote the script, shot it, acted in it, made the music for it, and edited it. I even made a website for it. It ended up costing me nothing because I did it all on my own. All the equipment I used was provided by the school. Filming was difficult, because operating the camera and acting in the front of the camera is difficult to do at the same time. It took about a week to plan shots and then three or four days of filming.

SKSM: How come you picked All That You Love Will Be Carried Away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Anthony Kaneaster: Well, when I finished reading Everything’s Eventual, that story just stuck out to me. It seemed completely different from any of the other stories. It just stayed with me and later on when I was sorting through possible movie projects, All that you Love just seemed like a logical choice. Simply put, it is a great story.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Anthony Kaneaster: When I was doing research for the film I stumbled upon his concept of the Dollar baby. So sent him an e-mail explaining what I was doing. I never actually sent him the check. The correspondent who e-mailed me back said since it was a student project I was not bound by the same regulations that would apply to a regular filmmaker. Oh well.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Anthony Kaneaster: Not really, it was pretty straightforward.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd release again would be possible?

Anthony Kaneaster: It’s awkward but kind of cool at the same time. I didn’t really think that this would make it beyond the classroom. It’s a pleasant surprise.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Anthony Kaneaster: Not him personally. As I said before I sent a few e-mails concerning my project, but he did not personally respond.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Anthony Kaneaster: Of course I would love to see a Dark Tower Film. But I am probably the last person to make that happen. There are a lot of great choices, but if I were to choose a story to make into a film it would probably be Quitter’s Inc.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Anthony Kaneaster: No, just that I hope that I did the story justice.

Title: Popsy (2006) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 25′
Director: Brian Haynes
Script: Brian Haynes
Cast: Keith Eyles, Navar Summers, Guido Roncallo, Brewier Welch, Angela Abell, Anwar Albaba, Matthew S. Brown, James Cheshire, Marcienne Dwyer, Justin Dyal, Spencer Fike, James Gavin, John Gavin, Matt Hill, Robert Janes, Ray Lloyd, Nicole Mercantini, Darren Summers, Kimberly Thompson, Mayleen Vega.
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She played in Steve Zakman‘s Dollar Baby Autopsy Room Four as Dr. Katie Arlen.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Torri Higginson: My name is Torri HIgginson, I am a working actor who has been in this business for 15 years. I studied in London England at the Guildhall college of music and drama. Upon completion of my studies I returned to Toronto Canada and kept busy with various theatre and telly gigs, with the odd b-movie action film thrown in for good measure. I am ucky enough to have always made my living as an actor and for that I am forever grateful.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Autopsy Room Four?

Torri Higginson: 5 years ago I moved to Los Angeles, and during my first months there I attended a screening of a film I did with Daniel Baldwin called ‘Irish Eyes‘, at that screening I met one of the Steve’s (i don’t recall now which one), who then approached me about his short film. I said yes. I didn’t have to audition, he just offered the part to me, I suppose what he saw of ‘Irish Eyes‘ was a good enough audition for him.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Torri Higginson: This was 5 years ago, and a lot of jobs have occupied my mind since then, so details are few. I recall having a great time on the shoot. Everyone was having fun and working hard, and very forgiving in regards to my bringing my dog to set each day

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Torri Higginson: I have not seen the short, and I am sure upon review anecdotes would jump into my forever forgetful brain, but sadly now I can’t recall. I do remember the filming of the scene when we realised he wasn’t dead, was rather funny.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Torri Higginson: I haven’t seen any of them since, I suppose that’s why I haven’t seen the film. If you contact him tell him to reach me and get me a copy. hee hee

SKSM: What did you do after Autopsy Room Four?

Torri Higginson: Visit IMDB.com and see for your self.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Torri Higginson: I read stephen king books as a teen, and enjoyed them very much, not as much as my sister, who was an avid fan. But a few years before this (Autopsy Room Four) I had the opportunity to work with and meet Mr King on a mini series he wrote for telly called “The Storm of the Century‘. The writing of that and the brief chats I had with him then made me a great fan of the man. So smart humble and generous.
I think his writing is so exciting, and works very well in the short film world. To be able to say so much in a short time, and lead the audience through various states of dread, emotion, and or intrigue is a sign of a man of great magnitudes.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Torri Higginson: Thanks for your curiosity, I hope I offered something of interest in return.

He played in Bernardo Villela‘s Dollar Baby Suffer The Little Children as Buddy Jenkins.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Bob Bowersox: I have been an entertainer since I was 16. Started out in music, and during my twenties, I made a couple of albums and did a lot of touring. Became a recording engineer for a while in New York, recording jazz and TV spots, as well as some of my own stuff. Then did a number of other things — produced and engineered national radio shows, started and edited a magazine, was a columnist for a Gannett newspaper. Then I started seriously acting, and haven’t stopped since…been doing it for about 25 years now.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Suffer the Little Children?

Bob Bowersox: I became involved in Suffer the Little Children by auditioning. I auditioned for a couple of parts, but they really liked me for Buddy Jenkins, and that’s the part I ended up doing for them.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Bob Bowersox: As I said, I auditioned for the part.

SKSM: You worked with Bernardo Villela on this film, how was that?

Bob Bowersox: Working with Bernardo and producer Mark was very professional. It’s not often that you get young, low budget filmmakers who treat you with as much respect and support as they did. They knew what they wanted, and it was easy working with them…a very enjoyable time.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Bob Bowersox: My time on the set was very focused and workmanlike. While we had some light moments, there really wasn’t anything that stood out as unusual.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Bob Bowersox: Mark stays in touch with us regularly, usually through email. He’s kept us up-to-date on how the film is doing in the festivals, and what they’re planning on doing with it next.

SKSM: What did you do after Suffer the Little Children?

Bob Bowersox: Since doing my part in Suffer, I’ve done a number of other films — a couple of features, and one or two shorts. The features are VICTIM’S SONG, which is in post-production in Los Angeles at the moment — I had one of the leads in the film, the role of Gordon Bavitch, a homicide cop with some emotional baggage, who ends up doing things his own way to bring a killer to justice. I also did a feature called BAMBOO SHARK, which should be released soon. I played a Hollywood film executive in that one. I’ve been cast in a new horror film to be shot early next year called HUSH…I’ll play the dad of one of the young stars. Other than that, I’ve been doing a lot of writing — I’ve written fiction, plays, and screenplays for a number of years.

SKSM: Have you seen the second version of Suffer The Little Children: The Bathroom Scene by Ryan J Hannigan and if so, what do you think of it?

Bob Bowersox: I have not seen the second version of Suffer. Thanks for the heads-up on it.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Bob Bowersox: Frankly, I’ve not read any Stephen King, but I’ve enjoyed several of the movies that have been made from his stories, particularly THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Bob Bowersox:

She is the woman behind Walking Ghost

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Sarah Sterchele: I’ve recently graduated from Eastern Michigan University with a degree in television and film production, and now I’m off to seek my fame and fortune.

SKSM: When did you make The Walking Ghost? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Sarah Sterchele: “The Walking Ghost” was created winter of 2005 – the worst time of the year to shoot a film in Michigan. Shooting took approximately 6 weekends, and cost about $1000 total.

SKSM: How come you picked The Gunslinger to develop into a movie called The Walking Ghost? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Sarah Sterchele: This is going to be a long one…

I chose “The Gunslinger” for several reasons. I am a big fan of Italian Westerns. I love how Italian Neo-Realism put a spin on an inherently American genre. Compared to the American Western, everything is so minimalistic – the acting, the dialogue, even the scenery, in a way. You see these great expanses of land, the Spanish panorama, and it’s absolutely beautiful, but at the same time, it dwarfs the human condition. I also find the themes fascinationg – the disillusionment of morality and desolate indidualism. Anyway, I felt that the first book, The Gunslinger, embodied everything I loved about the genre. Secondly, and more importantly, however, was our budget. We were shooting a short, silent film, and we thought to ourselves, “What story could we tell with no dialogue that could narrate itself entirely through pantomine?” and again, of course, the Italian Western suited our needs.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Sarah Sterchele: Heh, at first I didn’t know, which is why so many people accuse us of mangling the film. The film was made as a senior thesis and was intended to be shown in film festivals. Not knowing that Stephen King sold rights, we altered The Gunslinger enough so that on the surface, no one could accuse us of stealing King’s ideas. However, if you look closely, the basic premise of the story is still there, just a little bit different.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Sarah Sterchele: Working with a competent cast and crew was special. Editing was a drag though – we had to cut the film with a razor – yes, a RAZOR, and splice it with tape! Hours and hours of toiling over film strips…

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie anymore? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd or internet broadcast release again would be possible?

Sarah Sterchele: I’m kind of glad they can’t see it, because I think everyone hated it and I get tired of the unwarranted criticisms that I STILL receive from angry fans!

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Sarah Sterchele: I received an e-mail from his assistant, and that’s about it. It would be cool if he spent 10 minutes of his life watching it, but he’s probably much too busy swimming in his indoor pool.
SKSM: What do you think of Robert David Cochrane 2004 version of The Gunslinger?

Sarah Sterchele: It’s different. His is a direct adaptation of a small event in the book, word for word. Ours encompasses a broader timespan of the book and is more inspired by the book rather than adapted from. Mostly though, I find it strange that in his version, one person plays all three characters – Come on…doesn’t anyone else think that’s weird (or egotistical and self-aggrandizing)?

“The reason Cochrane played all three roles was because that film was made specifically for and won Simon & Schuster’s (King’s Publisher) “American Gunslinger” contest whose rules required only one person appear in the film.” Link: http://www.simonsays.com/subs/21/RCochrane.html

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Sarah Sterchele: Well, it would have to be book 4 of the Dark Tower Series – Wizard and Glass, because that is my favorite book of the series.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Sarah Sterchele: I have no fans!! Boo. But, I do want to take the time to say thank-you to everyone who participated in the making of this film. Although you all have moved on with your lives, the time and effort you put into it is greatly appreciated. Everyone gave it 110% (except Doug) and for that I am grateful. (Just kidding Doug, you were super.)

 

He played in Dave Brock‘s Dollar Baby The Road Virus Heads North as the Road Virus.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Matthew Brock: My name is Matthew Brock and I’m currently the Manager of a Salvation Army Social Service Office and Thrift Store. We help people who need food, clothing, shelter, and toys for children at Christmas time. I also work on film projects with my bother, David, and my sister, Becky.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The Road Virus Heads North?

Matthew Brock: I have a verbal agreement with my brother to be in all of his films and help work on them when I’m available. It is ironclad and punishable by wedgie if he breaks the deal. He sees me as a good luck charm now, so I hope to do more.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Matthew Brock: I think he adapted it with me in mind. We had hoped to do more scenes with me actually ‘doing’ things, but at the time, my job had me on call 24/7 and we barely got the pictures done.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Matthew Brock: The man who loaned us the car refused to drive to location on the day of the shoot due to ‘potential’ rain. It was the only day I could be there, so we went to him and shot all the angles. The car was actually in a field and they used photoshop to alter the backgrounds. They did a great job. I also had trouble fitting in the car. My knees were up in my chest. I’m about 6′ 4″, 300+ lbs and the car was NOT made for me….it was painful.

SKSM: You worked with your own brother and sister on this film, how was that?

Matthew Brock: We always work together on projects, so it wasn’t much different from everything else we do. We work great together and seem to supplement each other very well.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Matthew Brock: I didn’t get to work with anyone in the movie,sadly. Our shoot was seperate from the rest.

SKSM: What did you do after The Road Virus Heads North?

Matthew Brock: I went back to work. My film career is horribly short right now. We (my brother, sister, and I) are working on some new projects. They are busy writing and producing and I’m picking out what part I want *wink*

SKSM: How did they make the paintings with you in it? And what do you think of the painting in the Nightmares and Dreamscapes episode? Which one did you like better?

Matthew Brock: The paintings are just photos altered to look like they have a painted finish and a lot of Photoshop was used to create the backgrounds. I didn’t like the Nightmares as Dreamscapes paintings at all. They looked more like drawings. I didn’t care much for the episode and it’s not because we did this version. It seemed a little too long and the Road Virus talked! He didn’t talk in the story. One of the things I like about the story was you never saw his real face, just the painting. There were a few things that I did like, such as some of the exterior painting angles and the scene where his ex-wife saw his damaged car and she asked if someone had tried to steal his painting.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Matthew Brock: Some of my favorite books are The Stand, Eye of the Dragon, Cell, and Dreamcatcher. I think The Stand was also the best mini-series.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Matthew Brock: If I may, I would like to take this time to shamelessly promote some of my sister’s stuff. She wrote some great short stories in Book of All Flesh and Brainchild. Check out her site at www.horrorhack.com. There are also links to all of our My Space pages at www.myspace.com/cardoc24 Write me…I just started the page and I want to add some friends. Thanks for the interview.

 

Title: The boogeyman (1982) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 28′
Director: Jeff Schiro
Script: Jeff Schiro
Cast: Michael Reid, Bert Linder, Terence Brandis, Mindy Silverman, Jerome Bynder, Bobby Persicelli, Michael D’Agostino, Nancy Lindeberg, James Holmes, Ross Macdonald, Dave Buff, Rich West, John CotĂ©, Brooke Trivas.
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