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Title: Suppr. (2005) Bandera de Francia
Runtime: 19′
Director: Nicolas Heurtel (Read interview)
Script: Nicolas Heurtel & Charles L. Lacroix
Cast: Stephane Moreau, Christian Février
Trailer
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One of the people behind Kingdom Hospital Theme Worry About You.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about Ivy? Who is Ivy and what does Ivy do?

IVY(Andy Chase): We formed in 1993 as an indie pop trio, based out of NYC. We started on tiny record label called SEED, then moved around to a bunch of majors like Atlantic and Sony. We’re currently signed to Nettwerk Records. Our singer Dominique is French, I’m from Washington, DC and Adam is from New Jersey. In the studio me and Adam play all the instruments and the three of us produce the albums. Live we add another guitar player (besides myself), a drummer, and a keyboardist so that we’re a six-piece when we tour.

SKSM: When did Ivy make Worry About You? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to make it?

IVY(Andy Chase): That song was written for our album Long Distance in 1999. It started as a simple, almost nursery rhyme on the acoustic guitar. We wanted to keep the song minimal and somewhat “spooky”, never expecting of course what else it was destined for! Adam initially put the acoustic guitar part down to a click track. I added the Wurlitzer Piano and then we found a drum loop we really liked from my loop library. Dominique was very pregnant when she sang this and her voice was very low and husky as a result. She had to take many breaks because she kept getting out of breath. It was very hard for her, but I love the way her voice sounded. I’m trying to keep her pregnant every time we make a record now! Anyway, all said, it took about 2 or 3 days to feel like we were totally finished with it. We recorded it, as well as the rest of the album, in our own studio so it’s hard to say how much it really cost.

SKSM: “Worry about you” seems to be written for someone. Is that true, and if so, for who is it?

IVY(Andy Chase): We don’t like to be too literal in Ivy. We prefer to hint at things and make subtle innuendoes. Songs like this are an amalgamation of a few different tales from our past.

SKSM: How did you react when you found out that your song was going to be used in a Stephen King series?

IVY(Andy Chase): Very excited. I’ve been a huge fan of his since the early 80’s.

SKSM: What do you think about the series?

IVY(Andy Chase): Well, I was a bit mixed about it. I loved how cerebral and strange it was but that was probably it’s downfall as well. It aired on ABC which, because it’s a major network, played 4 minutes of commercials every 15 minutes throughout the show. That became very distracting and broke the rhythm of this kind of movie. It would have been much wiser to get it played on HBO as I think the type of viewers who appreciate this sort of thing would have been found there. ABC viewers are famous for liking their material dumbed-down and not too complicated.

SKSM: Did Ivy have any personal contact with Stephen King during the making of Kingdom Hospital?

IVY(Andy Chase): For a brief while it looked like ABC wasn’t going to agree to the terms of the deal with our label and publisher and, as a result, was about to pass on using our song. We were all quite surprised and upset about it, including Stephen King. He wrote a very strong email to the executives at ABC expressing the extent of his anger if they didn’t use our song. As a result ABC agreed to work it out. We thought that was very cool.

SKSM: Have you become more popular since Kingdom Hospital?

IVY(Andy Chase): A bit. We certainly get a lot of emails from people saying they’re happy they discovered us watching the series.

SKSM: Are you King-fans yourselves? If so, what is your favorite book/movie?

IVY(Andy Chase): Absolutely. We all think Carrie and The Shining are two of the best horror films ever made. And I think I’ve read pretty much everything he wrote up until about 10 years ago when I got too busy with the music business. My favorite book is probably my favorite because it was also my first — Pet Semetary. I read it right when it came out back in the early 80’s.

SKSM: If you were asked to do another track for a King-production, would you accept it, and what track would you like to see in a movie?

IVY(Andy Chase): Absolutely! In a second. We’d even score original stuff for him if he wanted.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

IVY(Andy Chase): We’re coming to Spain to play this November ’05, in case any of you live near there. Otherwise, check our website from time to time to find out about what’s going on. www.thebandivy.com

He is the man behind Suffer The Little Children Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Bernardo Villela: I am a filmmaker. I studied at Fairleigh Dickinson- Madison and then transferred to CW Post- Long Island University where I graduated in May 2005. I have been writing and yearning to make movies since I was fourteen and Suffer the Little Children is without a doubt my proudest achievement.

SKSM: When did you make Suffer the Little Children? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Bernardo Villela:Suffer the Little Children” was shot over 8 days in August 2005 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. We shot on a DVX 100A. Our brilliant cast is lead by Angela Pietropinto as Miss Sidley, Chris Lutkin as Mr. Hanning, Bob Bowersox as Buddy Jenkins, last but certainly not least Adam Montgomery as Robert. Our special effects were done by Temporal Distortions F/X.

SKSM: How come you picked Suffer the Little Children to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Bernardo Villela:Suffer the Little Children” is my favorite short story in the Nightmares and Dreamscapes collection. I believe it’s just a flat out masterpiece. It is a simple story to follow on the surface but it goes knee-deep into ambiguity by leaving you guessing as to whether Sidley is ill or if her students really do change. I’ve read it many times and have come out thinking both at the end. After all you can assume that Jenkins merely developed the same acute psychosis that Sidley has.

It is also probably the most visual and dramatic of the stories I was considering. There are many great images and scenes already in the text that are quite cinematic. I believe my only other viable option was “The Last Rung on the Ladder“, while it’s a beautiful, tragic tale it didn’t have the same visual appeal or as linear a plot, as Ladder would need to be told mostly in flashback.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Bernardo Villela: That’s actually a funny story. The “One Dollar Adaptation” is something I heard online but never found out if it was true. When Stephen King’s official website opened up a message board I decided to get to the bottom of it. His assistant confirmed it was true and the rest is history.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Bernardo Villela: The best moment for me on set was watching Angela and Adam (Sidley and Robert) doing their takes for the scene where Sidley keeps Robert after school, where Robert asks Miss Sidley if she’d like to see him “change.” It was a scene I thought most about and they delivered more than I ever imagined. Everyone, cast and crew was all about bringing the story to life and thinking about how to make the film all it could be. Angela suggested Sidley have a picture of her brother on the dresser and Adam suggested a name for Sidley’s substitute which she erases on her first day back. It was great to have everyone so dedicated to making the story come alive.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a dvd/video release would be possible?

Bernardo Villela: We are very confident in this film. All the performances in the film are fantastic, the effects look great and it is quite frightening. We are targeting many film festivals for submission and hopefully Suffer will reach many festival screens, and thus, many fans. Fans will be notified of future screenings at our website www.sufferproductions.com. If it does well and Stephen King likes it, we may ask permission for distribution but that’s down the road some. Many people we’ve spoken to about the film are excited just by the fact that we chose this particular story so I am hopeful.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Bernardo Villela: No, I didn’t. We are still in the editing process as we speak and when we have completed the cut I am planning on sending him the DVD and a copy of the script.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Bernardo Villela: Wow, that’s a great question. I’ve been a fan of Stephen King’s for a long time so many of his stories have struck me as possible adaptations that I’d want to do down the road with exclusive rights and the ability to distribute. My dream choice would probably be Roadwork. I’ve read it twice and I could probably read it again in a heartbeat. I think it’s a great and underrated tale of one man fighting the system and to hold on to his past. The fact that it’s overlooked makes me appreciate it even more than other stories I like just as much if not more like The Long Walk, Gerald’s Game and The Dark Tower III and IV, because they’re so well known.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Bernardo Villela: I hope that fans of the story do get a chance to see this film. I worked with people who were both fans of King and those who only read the story because they were working on it, and it was pretty much unanimous that Sidley, Hanning, Robert and Jenkins were all perfectly cast. Also, there are no major story changes here. This is the story you’ve read with but a few minor changes, like a less ambiguous ending that I will not give away, to make it more cinematic. I know some adaptations of his work have been quite disappointing. I don’t believe “Suffer the Little Children” falls into that category.

 

He is the man behind King’s short story The Revelations of ‘Becka Paulson.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Steven Weber: I am an actor who has worked in theatre, television and film for the last 25 years (resumé available on IMDB)

SKSM: When did you make The Revelations of ‘Becka Paulson? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Steven Weber: My association with Stephen King began before that when I did the miniseries version of “The Shining” (directed by Mick Garris). I found the original story in an anthology of horror and fantasy tales that I picked up and thought it would make a cool little film. I contacted the Outer Limits people, who I knew, and suggested the project. They liked it and off I went. The entire production was roughly two weeks (one week of pre-production and one week of shooting). I’m not sure what the cost was. It couldn’t have been much.

SKSM: How come you picked The Revelations of ‘Becka Paulson to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Steven Weber: I liked the humor in the writing and thought that The Outer Limits could use some humor ion their programming.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Steven Weber: Working with Catherine O’Hara was very special for me. I had always been a fan of hers and was very impressed with her choices and her ability. As it was my first experience directing, every moment was special.

SKSM: Are there things cut out of the movie that you miss now?

Steven Weber: I did a “director’s cut” that had a different approach to the overall editing of the episode that I preferred. I felt that the final product was a little too linear. I tried to enhance the feeling of the character’s insanity through editing and through funny off-beat music. The producers thought my choices were too odd and they wouldn’t pay for the rights to use the music, instead opting for more generic music. But enough of the elements I like have survived.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Steven Weber: I had no contact with him during the filming. I did, however, have a lot of contact with him during the filming of “The Shining” and found him to be extremely open, funny, approachable and fascinating. I think he liked “Revelations”. At least, I hope he did.

SKSM: How did you get started as a director and what do you do on a production?

Steven Weber: I started directing as a fluke, having been around it for so long a time as an actor. I absorbed aspects of it and always was observant and when the opportunity arose I leapt at it.

SKSM: Did you have any experiance making that kind of movies at the time?

Steven Weber: I had always been a fan of the horror/fantasy genre (I just wrote and acted in an episode of an upcoming series called “Masters of Horror” that was directed by Dario Argento. It seemed fitting that my first foray into directing would be something from that world.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Steven Weber: Not at this time.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Steven Weber: Only to say that Stephen King is worthy of all the adoration his fans have mustered and that he is as real and remarkable as any fan would hope him to be.

 

He’s the man behind the original 1984 movie “Firestarter“, based on King’s novell with the same title.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark L. Lester: I was born in Cleveland, Ohio in a not so rich family. We lived in the projects, but I later moved to LA and got into film. I now own a distribution company and still direct.

SKSM: When did you make Firestarter? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mark L. Lester: I made Firestarter in 1983 in North Carolina. It took us 10 weeks and cost us 10 million dollars.

SKSM: How come you picked Firestarter to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mark L. Lester: I was actually approached by Dino De Laurentiis to direct it. I didn’t pick it.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mark L. Lester: I do not have and projects lined up with King, but would do The Talisman which my son loved. It is however, I hear, already being adapted.

SKSM: How was it to work with the young Drew Barrymore: did you think then that she would become a great actress?

Mark L. Lester: She was great for an 8 year old. Wonderful to work with in every way. I knew she was destined for a long and eventful career in film.

SKSM: Are there things cut out of the movie that you miss now?

Mark L. Lester: Almost everything we shot made it into the final cut.

SKSM: Any funny bloopers?

Mark L. Lester: Not really. The actors were all very serious and dedicated to getting it right.

SKSM: What was Stephen King’s reaction to the movie?

Mark L. Lester: King didn’t approve at all and there was a big dispute between him and me in Fangoria Magazine. He doesn’t like many of the films based on his books though. He didn’t like the burning eyes and felt it strayed from his vision.

SKSM: Did you have any experiance making that kind of movies at the time?

Mark L. Lester: No, I had never shot a horror film before Firestarter.

SKSM: Did the actors do the stunts themselves?

Mark L. Lester: No, we used stunt doubles for almost every stunt and used a midget in a wig and costume to double for Drew.

SKSM: How hard was it to find these actors?

Mark L. Lester: Everybody was on board and loved the novel, but since it was a Universal picture the actor’s had large salaries. George C. Scott received 1 million dollars for just 3 weeks of filming.

SKSM: What do you think about the sequel: Firestarter Rekindled?

Mark L. Lester: I thought it was a nice effort, but nothing like the original. I suppose that’s because they didn’t have a novel to base that one upon.

SKSM: What movies did you make after Firestarter that we can know you from also?

Mark L. Lester: You can refer to www.imdb.com for a complete list. Just look up Mark L. Lester.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mark L. Lester: Tell them that I am extremely grateful for all their support. I think it’s great that they can get behind a film or person and support it/them so much. I’m forever in debt to you all. It would be nice if you could write letters to Universal asking them to do a reissue of the DVD with a commentary by me. I have asked Universal and need the fan support. Not to sound too conceded, but many fans would like an updated DVD version with special features.

Humbly,
Mark L. Lester

 

He is the man behind King’s short story Harvey’s Dream (El Sueño de Harvey).

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: My name is Rodolfo Guillermo Weisskirch; I am 21 years old and I live in Buenos Aires, Argentina. I’m in my last year of the Cinematography direction career at the University. I am also preparing two new shorts movies and finishing my second year thesis (“We Interrupt Our Program…“) and my career thesis, “Harvey’s Dream“.

SKSM: When did you make Harvey’s Dream? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Rodolfo Weisskirch:Harvey’s Dream” history started two years ago, on October, 2003, when I got the original story from Javier “Ziebal” Martos, a Spanish friend from a Stephen King’s Forum called “Kinghispano”. When I read the story I instantly thought in shooting it, but at that moment I was shooting “We Interrupt Our Program…”, and I postponed the project. Between February and April, 2004, I wrote the screenplay for my final thesis. In November, 2004, I started the preproduction with the help of Román Virgili, the actor’s and assistant director, Anahí Colombo, the first assistant director, Sol Damiani, the producer and Juan Cavia, one of the directors of photography.
During the last two weeks of November, three weeks of December and two weeks of January, 2005 we rehearsed with the actors: Hector Cesana, Estela Aurea Guelfi and Helene Grenbaum. The movie was shot between the last week of January and the first one of February and between the last week of February and the first one of March: they were nine hard days. It cost about 1000 pesos (US$ 350.00) and it was filmed with a Mini DV Digital Camera. I’m editing the movie as of May and I believe that will be finished (with sound, music, titles, subtitles and DVD included) by September.

SKSM: How come you picked Harvey’s Dream to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: When I choose any project, I always see what the story can transmit. I felt that “Harvey’s Dream” has a dense and tense climate. That was what attracted me. The relationship between the characters. This monotonous and boring marriage, falling in an abyss of non-dialogue, and suddenly bum! He wants to tell her, his dream, but very slowly. And the dream gets more and more scary. I really like the way she looks at him. A pessimistic vision of an American decadent middle class family due to government economic policies. It’s a very local, but also a very universal point of view.
The climate and the situation reminded me as of best of Bergman’s movies such as: “Autumn Sonata”, “Persona”, “Screams and Whispers” or “The Hour of the Wolf”.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: I knew about it thanks to Ariel Bosi from the “Kinghispano” forum who advised me to look into this website. They were wonderful news for me, because it’s very difficult for an Argentinian to buy the rights of any story and it’s harder to get a Stephen King one. I couldn’t send him the dollar yet, because Marsha DiFillipo never answered my letter about how I can send the dollar and where to.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: We have a lot of problems with the weather, because the days that we have to shoot outdoors, it was raining or very cloudy. It was also very hot and humid similar to the weather in the story. We have to interrupt shooting during the first week of February, because of the weather and after that, some of the crew members and the actors went away on vacation. We were lucky to start shooting again on the last week of February.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd release would be possible of on our website?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: I hope some day, people will be able to see the film anywhere.Perhaps, I can take the movie to a local film festival but I don’t know yet. First I will finish it and then I’ll see. I intend to release the DVD in your website soon.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: Only in my dreams. As Mrs. Marsha DiFillipo has never answered my letter I can’t expect Mr. Stephen King to ever write me. It would be great to meet him in the near future.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: No at the moment, but I like Stephen King’s stories and novels, and I hope to shoot another one.
I read the first chapter of his new book which is going around the Internet, “The Pulse”, and it’s very interesting. It has a big catch.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: I hope that someday anybody will be able to see the short movie in the website, please be patient (because probably it will be slow at the beginning) and enjoy it. I hope to see more short movies from the whole World and especially from Latin America.

 

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