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He is the man behind King’s short story Suppr..

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Nicolas Heurtel: I’m a “little” frenchie of 27 years old and the Cinema is a great passion to me… so I gave up my studies in architecture to study film making at the university 3 years ago. This is where I met some good friends, and we finaly created a little team, and we made all of ours movies together. We made about 6 short, all amaters, “suppr.” being the last on the list, made in June 2005. My first “professionnal” short is in project, I’m the script and director and I just have to find… some money !

SKSM: How come you picked Wordprocessor of the Gods(Suppr.) to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Nicolas Heurtel: The first reason is that I’m a great fan of SK since I’m 13 ! The first book of SK I read was “The long walk” and it really impressed me, I never read something like that before. Since then, I read all of his books. So, I naturally feel the need to adapt one of his novel, but few are easy to adapt, for amaters like us… “Wordprocessor of gods” is a part of those who were conceivable, in one condition, rewrite the story to create an “evil” character, a twin evil which could come right from “Secret window” and so create some difficulty, cause without difficulty, there’s no story to tell.

The second reason is that we hadn’t much time to do it, we all were very tired by our previous movie which took us 2 months (a 45 minutes movie !) so it was a kind of recreation to make a “little” movie of 15 minutes ^^ And it’s very interresting to work on the adaptation of an existing work.

SKSM: When did you make Wordprocessor of the Gods(Suppr.)? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Nicolas Heurtel: It’s a complete non-professional project, because we were students. A member of the team wrote a first version of the script… and the four of us gave our ideas. After that, I modified this first version, to make everyone pleased, including our teacher, cause it was at first place a work for university! The second part was to find unpaid actors. As we were in Paris, there are several ways: theatre schools, associations which give some catalogs of professionals and non professional actors (with resume and pictures of them). So we took an afternoon to note some names and give some calls to know if they were interested with the project. We were lucky, we found pretty quickly, so in 2 or 3 weeks, we had a script and actors we casted.

After that, we transformed a friend’s cellar into an office. Another member of the group made the machine. The shooting take 2 days : 1 in the office, an other for the scene in the kitchen and the sitting room, in the house of an other friend. We had to do it very quickly. We took an afternoon to record the off-voices at the university.

We then did the cutting and special effects in 2 or 3 weeks (cause we had exams and class, we couldn’t work on it very often).

The movie didn’t cost anything, except some pizzas !

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Nicolas Heurtel: There are always funny moments, but as we haven’t much time and lot to do, we try to stay serious during the shooting! In fact, there was something rather funny… In the basic script, the man has a son (as in the original novel) but we finished the shooting day with this boy and it was too late, so the boy couldn’t come. Finally, after some phone calls, we found a girl to replace him, the sister of a friend of somebody in the team (rather complicated eh?)

Something else: the journalist we can see at TV is a real journalist but also the most famous of the TV news presenter in France, he gathered more the half of the TV viewers! We got something like 3 minutes to shoot with him! We were really exited he was okay to participate.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd release would be possible?

Nicolas Heurtel: It’s very pleasant to see that ideas, drawings, texts and movies can freely circulate… and that they have a life on the Internet! I was surprised when you contacted me to ask some questions! I really happy to share what I do and what I love with other people… this is generaly the reason to make cinema ^^

And to have a beautiful copy of the movie, it will take some time but we’ll do it… we are rewriting subtitles and after that we should be able to burn it on a DVD or send it directly on the Internet.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Nicolas Heurtel: No! I would be pretty ashamed to show him this movie cause the script is too much confuse! And this is more a tribute to King than an adaptation (for instance in the drawing of the credits at the beginning of the film, we can read “Castle Rock” and see “Christine” in front of “Le bazaar des rêves” (NEEDFUL THINGS)… or the complete collection of King’s books on the shelves of writer’s shelves…) and I don’t think that would interest him… but if you know him personally, just tell him I’m very interested to adapt some of his books!!!

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Nicolas Heurtel: No, for the moment, I don’t have other projects, cause, like I said earlier, it’s not easy to adapt King, specially without money ! But sure, there are stories I would like to adapt, like “The long walk”… I read it regularly and really think it could be a great movie !

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Nicolas Heurtel: I just want to thank you for the interest you showed for my work. And, hum… Cheers to Stephen King !

He played in Shawn Lealos‘ Dollar Baby I Know What You Need as Shane.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Robert McIlrath: My name is Robert McIlrath, I am 26 years old and currently reside in Norman, OK, USA. I am an actor and producer, working mainly with the company that I started with Shawn Lealos, Starving Dogs Productions.

SKSM: How did you become involved in I Know What You Need?

Robert McIlrath: Shawn found out about the Dollar Baby movies that Mr. King allows student filmmakers to make and I thought it would be a great film to produce. The best part of making I Know What You Need is not only is it a work of Mr. King’s, but it is a great showcase for student and independent filmmakers. This particular film not only showcased the great actors we had, but also Shawn’s ability to adapt a story into a screenplay.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Robert McIlrath: This role was written for me for two reasons. 1. I have a bad case of the acting bug, and love to be in anything I can. 2. Shawn really wanted build more character depth in the story, therefore he add this character into the story to help Alice in her search about Edward.

SKSM: You worked with Shawn Lealos on this film, how was that?

Robert McIlrath: Shawn is an amazing director to work with. As an actor, he is very patient and understanding, while still being firm on what he sees as the character. As a producer, he makes working alot of fun. He has such an artistic vision when he steps behind the camera, and doesn’t settle for any thing less.

SKSM: Where there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Robert McIlrath: The funniest thing about the movie was Kevin Real. Kevin played Edward in the movie, and was so into the character, that he would start to scare people when he didn’t break character.

SKSM: What did you do after I Know What You Need?

Robert McIlrath: I’ve kept very busy since I Know What You Need. We have made three more films since the completion of IKWYN, where I have pulled double duty by producing and acting.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Robert McIlrath: Of course I talk to Shawn on a daily basis. I also try to keep in touch with Kevin Real and Colin Warde. They are both great actors and I look forward to working with them again, hopefully on our first feature film at the end of 2006.

SKSM: Voodoo is an important part of the story. Do you believe in it, or did you have personal experience with voodoo?

Robert McIlrath: I have not had any experiences with voodoo, but would like to learn more about it. I try to keep an open mind about everything, I just have never had any dealings with it.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Robert McIlrath: I am a very big fan of Mr. King’s. I think he is one of the most intelligent writers of all time and I think his accomplishments speak for themselves. My personal favorite is It, book and movie.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Robert McIlrath: I just hope everyone that had a chance to see the movie liked it, and now that we a score completed, I hope more people get a chance to see it. We will be sending IKWYN to many more film festivals in the upcoming months and will try to keep everyone posted.

 

He played in Shawn Lealos’s Dollar Baby I Know What You Need as Tony.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Colin Warde: Since early 2005 I’ve been working behind the camera in production, usually as a production assistant, but frequently in art department on feature films and television in Oklahoma and Los Angeles. Before that I wrote a novel and I write whenever I’m not working on a show. I’ve been in LA four months and have just got my headshots so I’ll be looking for representation before I start my next crew gig.

SKSM: How did you become involved in I Know What You Need?

Colin Warde: I worked at Speeding Bullet Comics in Norman, Oklahoma (United States) and Shawn Lealos who directed the short came in to talk to the owner about doing a movie in the café that is part of the shop. I was referred to Shawn by my boss Matt Price because I was taking technical film classes at Oklahoma City Community College at the time and acting almost weekly in front of a couple of classes.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Colin Warde: I didn’t have to audition. Shawn needed me to do replace an actor who was unavailable for re-shoots due to sound problems I believe. Because the production was small and professional contacts in that part of the country are limited a lot of student projects and shorts are put together based on who is readily available like other students and friends. I’m sure the part was written for whoever had experience enough to fill the role. I happened to be lucky enough that it came along while I was available to work.

SKSM: You worked with Shawn Lealos on this film, how was that?

Colin Warde: Shawn is very motivated to get his work seen and off the ground. He has a network of supporting friends and interested parties who lend aid any way they can. No director can be the full energy of the crew no matter how small it is. He is just starting out and comes from a great part of the United States where people are perfectly willing to help one another and not confined by union rules. There is a bit of trial and error, there are personalities to deal with even in Oklahoma, there are money issues, when can people work? All these things become problems if you don’t have a solid producer who can manage these issues. Shawn can do it. He knows what he wants to get out of his crew and cast, and through his personality, his cooperative attitude, he gets it.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Colin Warde: Lots of things were fun and some of it translated onto the screen. My co-star Kevin gave me a lot to work with during our scene when we shook hands and he sort of wiped his hand off mine rather than give me a strong, sturdy handshake. It made for some laughs after the take and every time we watch it.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Colin Warde: Shawn and I talk on MySpace frequently and we worked on another promotional piece several months later with a lot of ground to cover due to a more ambitious script. I’m looking forward to catching up with Shawn when next I am in Oklahoma.

SKSM: What did you do after I Know What You Need?

Colin Warde: I worked on “I Know What You Need” over a weekend and then immediately joined the art department for the feature film “Surveillance” starring Armand Assante, directed by Fritz Kiersch through Graymark Productions. It was filmed in Oklahoma City and actually had its theatrical release there this week. Since then I worked on another film in October with Graymark Productions, “Soul’s Midnight” and most recently on a CBS TV pilot in Los Angeles called “3lbs.”

SKSM: Voodoo is an important part of the story. Do you believe in it, or did you have personal experience with voodoo?

Colin Warde: I have never experienced voodoo. It’s not something I like to think about. I don’t understand it because I’ve never studied it, it makes me uncomfortable. The closest I come to it would be the original form of zombies which I gather are from the Caribbean also. I enjoy zombie movies. I believe in a lot of things that people find superstitious, I don’t like to shut out the likelihood that anything exists. It’s best to be open minded, I don’t have to agree with everything, but I can respect anyone’s opinion.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Colin Warde: Oh, I really think that The Stand is probably my favorite book of all time. It’s such an American epic. The journey goes on and on, the characters are so well rounded, and it builds at its own pace like a good book ought to. I read it just after high school and at one point had to put it down because the revulsion I felt for one of the characters was so overwhelming. Six months later I started dreaming about the collapse of civilization as we know it and trying to survive the first months of an event like the plague just long enough to get away from all the craziness that would be associated to it and then escape to relative personal safety. I had to finish the book after that and I’ve read it twice since then.
I owe a lot to Stephen King due to his style because it’s so honest. I love his opinion columns in Entertainment Weekly. I frequently turn to the back to read that first. I also love his pseudo autobiography, “On Writing,” because it cleared up a lot of things for me while I was writing my own novel and grounds me every time I sit down to write. I always hear a little Stephen King voice in my head saying, “ignore the TV and the internet while I’m typing, work for a solid amount of time, nothing has to be perfect the first time,” and so many other things. I really appreciate that book.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Colin Warde: I have worked on a fair amount of film and video since I started only a year and a half ago. Before I worked with Shawn I worked with another friend who shares the same motivation to make movies, his name is Damon Blalack. Motivation and inherent talent are what gets us where we need to go in movies and writing. If it’s really something you want to get out there then you have to do it. Maybe you have to take some classes to learn how, maybe you have to make a piece of junk before you make an Academy Award winning feature, maybe you have to have a vision and rely on a crew to get it together. Stephen King gave everyone the opportunity to make movies out of his short stories because I think he understands motivation. That’s what the Dollar Babies are all about. Hollywood can afford to throw out loads of bad movies because they have the money, but independent producers and student filmmakers can’t do that, they have to have an excellent script from the beginning because they can’t have major stars and explosions that attract audiences. Stephen King gives us the opportunity to make something around a great story.

She is the woman behind Tijger Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Leyla Everaers: My name is Leyla Everaers and I study for Director at the Dutch film Academy in Amsterdam. Before I started this study, I have studied Audiovisual Design in Rotterdam for four years. I live in Amsterdam with my cat Britney and I’ll be 25 in a couple of weeks.

SKSM: When did you make Tijger (Here There Be Tygers)? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Leyla Everaers: In my previous study we had to make a couple of illustrations based on the story ‘Here There Be Tygers’. It’s a very visual story, like all King-stories. The illustrations have been in my drawer for about five years, and all this time I hoped to be able to make a movie out of it. While producing a movie in my third year of study, me and my crew got stuck after five months. I came up with the idea of ‘Here There Be Tygers’, and luckily the writer of the screenplay, Femke Boon, and producer Rozemarijn in ’t Veld liked the idea too. Three weeks later we had a finished script.

There are a couple of rules for making movies on the academy. Everyone gets the same amount of shooting days, the same amount of editing time, and the same amount of money (except for final exam movies, they have a larger budget because of sponsoring). We have shot the film in five days in January and February. We had three months of pre-production. Producer Rozemarijn and her team worked very hard, and while shooting the movie everything was prepared very good. We postproduced the movie for two weeks, and after that the movie was sent to a Visual Effects studio. They worked on ‘our’ tiger for three more months there. We’re still working on the sound, but the movie will probably be finished in July.

SKSM: How come you picked Here There Be Tygers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Leyla Everaers: The best part of the story is the magical realism that’s in it. Or what I think is in it. Personally, I don’t like realism, but the fun part of the movie is that you can loose yourself in another world for a while. Kings story is very suited for that. Making the movie was really great. Again, I didn’t expect this kind of attention. It was really weird to be asked when the movie was finished by strangers. I really like it that people are so interested. It’s also scares me, because King fans will have expectations I won’t be able to fulfill. I feel the same way with movies based on books.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Leyla Everaers: A special thing about the movie is the completely digitally created tiger. We discussed a real tiger, but we decided on a digital version. That works great, because we have control of everything the tiger does then. It was the first time for me with Visual Effects, and it has been great. You have to decide on things very early, and wait so long before you see the result. They finished the tiger last week, and it was definately worth the wait!

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Leyla Everaers: I hadn’t heard of the Dollar Baby deal until the postproduction. I knew all along I couldn’t screen the movie outside of the academy. I never intended to do so either. But all of a sudden we got media attention, and we were contacted by Stephen King Short Movies.

We haven’t decided whether we will buy the rights or not. The movie is a exercise, and since it hasn’t been finished yet we can’t tell whether it’s been a success or not. The most important thing is that I’ve learned a lot while making it, and I can use that knowledge when creating my final exam movie.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Leyla Everaers: No, I don’t have any other plans for doing more King movies. There are so many beautiful adaptations already! My favourite is ‘The Stand’. That one really impressed me. When I was a teenager, I read the book, and I really love the theme.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Leyla Everaers: Thanks for your interest! I really like to see people appreciate it that much without knowing what it will look like in the end…

Translated by Danny Paap of StephenKing.nl

 

She played in Scott Albanese’s Dollar Baby All That You Love as the Housewife.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Laurie Morgan: I am married with 3 teenage boys ages 18, 16 & 14. I began singing in bands at age 19 and continued until I was 30. I took time off for marriage and children; then when my youngest was about 6 years old I began performing in musical theater. About the same time I began oil painting. A few years later I started auditioning for film and Television. I also play piano and guitar. I am an accomplished painter with my paintings in galleries.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love?

Laurie Morgan: I became involved with “All That You Love” by answering a casting notice.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Laurie Morgan: I did audition for the part.

SKSM: You worked with Scott Albanese on this film, how was that?

Laurie Morgan: Scott was a very creative and nice guy.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Laurie Morgan: I think the funniest part of making the movie was my audition. I came to the audition in a muumuu, fuzzy slippers and curlers in my hair. Scott loved it so much he asked me to wear them for the filming.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Laurie Morgan: I still keep in contact with Kent Vaughn because we did another movie
together a few years later.

SKSM: What did you do after All That You Love?

Laurie Morgan: Since I did “All that you Love”, I’ve done numerous musical theater, TV and film.

SKSM: There are four different adaptations of this story. What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Laurie Morgan: I wasn’t familiar with the story before I made the film.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Laurie Morgan: I do like some of Stephen King’s work as long as it’s not the scary type. I prefer the psychological thrillers.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Laurie Morgan:

 

She played in Brian Berkowitz’s Dollar Baby Sorry, Right Number as Dawn.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Karla Droege: I have been working in the entertainment field since I was 12 years old. Bitten early by the acting bug, I had my first role as a gingerbread child in a stage production of Hansel and Gretel. After getting a degree in theatre from Lenoir-Rhyne College and working 10 years professionally, I discovered a passion for television and film. Since gravitating toward the camera, some of my favorite projects include “Big Fish” directed by Tim Burton, “America’s Most Wanted,” and hosting for “Gospel Music Channel.” I had leading roles in two independent features that were filmed last year as well as numerous commercials currently airing around the country.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Sorry, Right Number?

Karla Droege: You know, it’s been awhile, but I believe I saw an audition posting on-line and put myself on tape. I dinstinctly remember shooting the audition because I enlisted a friend of mine with a camera to help me. He has three large dogs, so it was an entertaining comedy of errors to try and get them to stay out of the shot.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Karla Droege: Well, I suppose I stole my thunder on this question by already telling the dog story. I’ve not had a part written directly for me, but I’m certainly open to the idea. Anyone? Spielberg?

SKSM: You worked with Brian Berkowitz on this film, how was that?

Karla Droege: He was great! I didn’t know what to expect having never met him before the shoot. He was so organized and knew exactly the kind of shots, feel and look that he wanted while leaving plenty of room for the actors and crew to add their own creativity. It is so important to have a director driving the car, or else it become impossible for everyone else to do their job.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Karla Droege: I drove up from Atlanta for the shoot, and the evening I was due to leave an ice storm hit Atlanta. But, being hard-headed, I went anyway. While driving, I thought to myself, I have truly lost my mind. Luckily, about 2 hours outside of Atlanta it turned into rain, and it worked out fine.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Karla Droege: No, I send postcards to Brian periodically, but that’s about it.

SKSM: What did you do after Sorry, Right Number?

Karla Droege: I have continued my acting career which has steadily grown since shooting Sorry, Right Number. That has included shooting about half a dozen indie feature films along with two tv shows and multiple commercial and corporate projects.

SKSM: Have you seen the original Tales From The Darkside episode, and what do you think of it?

Karla Droege: I haven’t seen it, nor am I going to download it….and for the bizarre explanation, see the next question.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Karla Droege: To be totally honest, I have no idea. Part of what helps me as an actor is that I have a very vivid imagination. The down side of that is that I am about the biggest wuss when it comes to anything even mildly scary. I’m also a sleepwalker, and let me just say that the two do not go hand in hand. So I have never seen or read anything by Stephen King, except this script. Now, the odd part of all this, is that I have no trouble acting IN scary movies. I’m really not sure why that is, but I’ve just decided not to question.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Karla Droege: Yes, thanks for checking us out and keep your eyes out for me on the big screen in the next few years!

She played in Peter Sullivan‘s Dollar Baby Night Surf as Susie.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Darcy Halsey: I am an actress living in LA for the past 8 yrs. All the stuff I have been in and worked on is on my website at DarcyHalsey.com Besides acting, I love reading all kinds of literature, traveling, and good horror films.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Night Surf?

Darcy Halsey: How I got involved with “NightSurf“? I sent my headshot in to be considered and I got called in for an audition. Peter Sullivan, the director, said part of the reason he called me in was because I wrote “Huge Stephen King fan” on a post it and stuck it to my picture.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Darcy Halsey: Like, I said, I had to audition for the part of Susie. It was written for me but I felt like it was meant for me. My audition went really well. They actually have our auditions on the DVD extra features.

SKSM: You worked with Peter Sullivan on this film, how was that?

Darcy Halsey: I loved working with Peter. He is very passionate about what he does and he worked hard. It was a challenging shoot but we had an amazing time. A lot of us crowded into a small house to shoot but the girls got the bed because… well, we’re girls. We had a lot of fun.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Darcy Halsey: There were a lot of funny moments… The ending actually got changed. it was supposed to be my boyfriend who kills the guy in the end. The actor Shon and I were lying in the hallway after we had been shot and the fight happened on the stairs and the gun was lying on the floor right near me. I knew my character didn’t die in the end but it was supposed to be that I just lay there until the end. I looked at Shon, who was supposed to be dead, and said “I would grab this gun and go shoot him. I wouldn’t just sit here.” Shon yelled to Peter, the director and said “Darcy has an idea.” I was embarrassed at first but told Peter and he loved that ending. So, I get to kill the bad guy in the end! Pretty cool.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Darcy Halsey: I am still in contact with some of the cast & crew. Mainly Peter and I keep in touch via e-mail and we occasionally run into each other at the local coffee shop. I also keep in touch with the producer Jason Charnick. That’s about it.

SKSM: What did you do after NightSurf?

Darcy Halsey: Gosh, “NightSurf” was really the beginning for me, my first legit thing. I have most recently done the new Wayans Brothers film “Behind the Smile” and the new Hilary Duff movie “Material Girls” which come out in August. I play Ted Ferguson’s girlfriend in the new BudLight campaign TedFerguson.com. I have worked on CSI and other TV shows and I act in a lot of theater productions here in LA.

SKSM: Night Surf is a prequel to The Stand. Have you read/seen The Stand and what do you think of it?

Darcy Halsey: Yes, I have read “The Stand” and it’s one of my favorite books of all time. I am honored to have done “Nightsurf” knowing King used it as a study for “The Stand“. I love stories like that, a band of people coming together to fight evil and save the world.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Darcy Halsey: I am a huge fan of Stephen King’s work. I just re-read the entire “Dark Tower” series and I am consistently blown away by his storytelling ability. He is also from Maine and I grew up in New Hampshire and my Mom lives in Maine so all of his stories feel like they are taking place in the town over from mine.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Darcy Halsey: What I would want to say to the fans that come to this site is, that every time I meet someone who is a fan of Stephen King I immediately feel a connection with them. I am so happy to be doing what I love and making a living at it. If I can continue to work on stories that inspire, move, or instigate me and the people who watch them then I will forever feel fulfilled. Thanks for caring about the work I do, Constant Readers. 🙂 Thanks, Bernd. Let me know if you need anything else.

 


He played in Scott Albanese‘s Dollar Baby All That You Love as Alfie Zimmer.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Kent Vaughan: I’m a member of SAG and AFTRA. After graduating from Weber State University in Utah, I was a traveling music teacher for one year. I moved to California, where I worked in the railroad industry for many years. I’ve been involved for most of my life in performing in musicals on stage. As an example, I played Capt. Von Trapp in ‘The Sound of Music’. I’ve been in most of the major musicals–usually performing in smaller theaters locally. I’m now on the Board of Directors for one of them, ‘Alliance for Performing Arts’ in San Dimas, California. I’ve been involved in film and television for the last 4 years, starring and co-starring in a number of films.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love?

Kent Vaughan: I auditioned for Scott Albanese, and, about a month later, received a call that I would be playing Alfie

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Kent Vaughan: I auditioned for the part.

SKSM: You worked with Scott Albanese on this film, how was that?

Kent Vaughan: Scott is a sensational director. This part was quite a challenge for me because the character is about as opposite from myself as any I’ve played. After coming from stage work, where everything is played much bigger than life, with big gestures and characters who really are all bigger than life, Scott had to rein me in to play this man who was pretty dead inside, and showed very little emotion, and very few gestures at all. Thankfully, Scott knew exactly what he wanted, and was able to convey that to me so that the result was a very well made film, which you probably already know, won best picture in competition at Chapman University.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Kent Vaughan: Two things come to mind.

1-The overcoat that I wore, was chosen by me for very sentimental reasons. It was my Dad’s favorite overcoat–he’s now deceased. The coat is now about 70 years old. I wore it to make my father a part of the movie. Also, in the book-signing scene I had a book of my father’s poetry near my desk for the same reason. I’m sentimental that way, I guess.

2-In another scene, Alfie goes to the door of a very sloppy housewife with a cigarette hanging out of her mouth. The very next movie I starred in was the full-featured movie with a very similar name: ‘All That I Need‘. My wife in that movie turned out to be that same lady, who now looked so different (in a very good way), that I didn’t recognize her at all. I’ve attached a picture in which I’m welcoming people to a yacht party…I’m a judge who convinces all of them that our pyramid scheme is totally legal and they should trust me. They do, and that’s their big mistake. Anyway, you can see my wife near the right side, with dark hair listening to me spout.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Kent Vaughan: I do talk to Scott occasionally. And I’ve seen him at several festivals where it has shown. I also email my ex-movie wife who is a very good actress on her own.

SKSM: What did you do after All That You Love?

Kent Vaughan:All That I Need” was the next movie. It did very at the Cannes Film Festival in France. I went there to promote the film. I was interviewed about the movie by E! Entertainment, and I later did the DVD commentary with the director of the film after a short run in the theaters here in the states.

SKSM: There are four different adaptations of this story. What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Kent Vaughan: I’m sure that there are many Alfie Zimmers out there, and it’s always interesting to ‘get in the head’ of someone else, and use that experience to better our own life, or, at least, understand others a little bit better. Scott mentioned to me that one of the reasons he wanted to do the film was because he knew two families who suffered the loss of one of their own to suicide. The idea that someone thinks so little of his own life that he could leave his life in the hands of a shorting-out lightbulb at the edge of a field, is compelling. You want to know just how anybody could get to such a state of mind.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Kent Vaughan: I’ve always been very much into sci-fi, and am working on a couple of sci-fi stories of my own. Stephen King is a genius, and I’ve read many of his works. I enjoy his work very much, and would love to be in his movie version of this story if he decides to make it into a full-length movie.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Kent Vaughan: Without sounding too corny, I really want the fans to know how much it means to an actor to know that people enjoy their work. If my work can bring a tear, a laugh, or help someone to emphasize with another person, then I am one, very happy, satisfied actor! I appreciate my fans more than I can say.
Thank you for your interest in my work.
Kent Vaughan

 

He played in Steve Zakman‘s Dollar Baby Autopsy Room Four as Rusty.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Eddie Ifft: I’m a former porn actor that decided after too many close calls with diseases and the dangerous underworld of black market porn to switch over to a better life and eventually serious acting.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Autopsy Room Four?

Eddie Ifft: After leaving the porn business I enlisted in the armed forces to get an education and rehabilitate my life. I ended up getting a pilots license and was eventually pushed into the NASA program. While at NASA I got the opportunity to work as a stuntman on some after school special films about the space program. That is where my desire to act thrived. I came down with a strange disorder similar to the bends from working in zero gravity. I packed up my bags and hitchhiked from Houston and headed for Hollywood. When I got to Hollywood I found a job at an Off Track Betting Parlor. At the OTB I learned which races were fixed, so I needed an investor to help me. I never found an investor in a sense. One of the horse owners gave me a horse to sell. He told me I could use the proceeds to use to gamble. While riding the horse in the Pacific Palisides one day I ran into a guy named Steve Zackman. He told me he was a director and was making a movie about a jocky and I was too tall for it, but I might fit well in another movie he was making about a dead guy.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Eddie Ifft: I never really auditioned. I met Steve and one of the producers, Rob Slane at the Ritz Carelton in Marina Del Rey. After an expensive dinner, we all went to a private room and I showed them clips of my acting in the adult films in which I have acted. Steve was amazed by my acting and Rob couldn’t leave the bathroom. I think he had a stomach flu.

SKSM: You worked with Steve Zakman on this film, how was that?

Eddie Ifft: Steve Zakman was a joy to work with. While on set he is so compassionate and lets the actor really grow and find his moments. Off camera is a little strange how you are not supposed to get eye contact with him, but I guess that is because he just wants to save the interaction for the shoot.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Eddie Ifft: One day on the set they told me I was going to have to do a sex scene. I wwas totally up for it because I thought the necrophelia stuff isn’t explored enough on mainstreem film. So, they had a closed set and they wanted me to go all out. When I walked in the room instead of the dead guy being on the gurney, they had a dead St. Bernard. I wanted to show how comitted I was to the craft, so I started the scene. It wasn’t til I heard them all laughing that I knew something was weird. I still don’t know where they found that dead dog, but he was a lot better than some of the women I have been with when I did porn.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Eddie Ifft: I think I freaked them out when I di the dog scene, so I don’t hear from them often. I was just acting though.

SKSM: What did you do after Autopsy Room Four?

Eddie Ifft: I took a nap and then I went to get something to eat and had my tires rotated.

SKSM: A new version of Autopsy Room Four is being made for the upcoming tv-series “Nightmares and Dreamscapes”. Are you excited about that?

Eddie Ifft: I am so excited. I would like to meet the guy who plays Rusty to see if they did the dog trick to him too.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Eddie Ifft: I never really knew who Stephen King was until I googled him when I read this question. Quite impressive I must say.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Eddie Ifft: Don’t always listen to directors. Sometimes you just need to go with your gut and if someone gives you a race horse to sell, chances are they just can’t afford to pay for a bullet to kill them. Don’t take the horse. It will just be a lot of aggrevation.

He played in Frank Darabont’s Dollar Baby The Woman In The Room as John.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Michael Cornelison: I am, and practically always have been, an actor. Got educated at The American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York, where I was room mates with Peter Weller (Robocop, Buckaroo Banzai). My career actually started in high school in Des Moines, Iowa. They shot a picture there called “Cold Turkey”, and I was Dick Van Dyke’s stand-in for an entire summer. That was my real college education. I do a lot of theater as well as film, but I love the movies.

SKSM: How did you become involved for The Woman in the Room?

Michael Cornelison: At the time, I was involved with a terrific woman named Katharine. She had gone to high school with Frank Darabont and Greg Melton. She thought we would make great friends, and we did. Frank and I had a huge number of loves in common: EC horror comics, Bernie Wrightson’s artwork. And Stephen King. He showed me his script for “Woman in the Room” which was, of course, great and told me of his Dollar Baby deal. He had the rights for, I think, one year. This was in the eleventh month. As an actor, I saw the value of it as a vehicle and my father was a stock broker who knew of some investors so, basically, we were off and running.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Michael Cornelison: No audition for me. My dad knew where the money was (insert laugh-track).

SKSM: You worked with Frank Darabont on this film, how did you find that back at that time ?

Michael Cornelison: Frank is – and always has been – as creative as he is kind. He’s a genuine gentleman of the old school and one of the pleasures of my life has been to watch how unaffected he has remained given all his success. He is, of course, a tad more polished as a director now, but no less a humanist, and that’s what counts.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Michael Cornelison: Ah! The “dream sequence”! As scripted, the elevator was supposed to open to reveal a huge pile of Viet Nam era body bags, which were to split open and vomit out all these writhing living corpses. On the day we were to shoot this, the props people proudly showed us the “body bags”: a box of Hefty garbage sacks. It just wouldn’t work. Frank was frantic, but we eventually concocted the sequence as you see it.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Michael Cornelison: Thank goodness for e-mail. Frank and I manage to squeeze off a line or two once in a while, especially if there’s something going on politically that we both support or hate. Michael Sloane and I exchange Christmas cards – his are some of the most creative in the world – and Doug Venturelli, our Executive Producer.

SKSM: What did you do after The Woman in the Room?

Michael Cornelison: Not too long after “Woman” I returned to the Midwest to concentrate on theater work, amongst other things. I’ve done a lot of fun stuff out here with Max Allan Collins, the original author of “The Road to Perdition”. We just finished a film version of a play he wrote for me: “Eliot Ness: an Untouchable Life”. It’s a one-man show that has turned out very well. Ironically, Max was just summoned to George Lucas’s Skywalker Ranch to be their expert on Eliot Ness for the special features on the “Young Indiana Jones” series DVD release. That’s a series that Frank Darabont wrote many an episode for. It’s a small business.

SKSM: Have you seen the French version of The Woman in the Room by Damien Maric and if so, what do you think of it?

Michael Cornelison: Wow! What an incredible visual style Damien has. Very polished. And at his age. And on that budget! I was tremendously impressed. I’m of two minds about making Johnny that young a character, but what the hell, it’s a great little film. He pays some very sly homage to Frank, as well. Extremely clever. It’s gorgeously lit, as well.

SKSM: Are you (or where you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Michael Cornelison: I stumbled across “Carrie” in hardcover before anyone knew who he was. It blew my mind. Then “Salem’s Lot”, “The Shining”, “The Stand”… This maniac just kept upping the ante! I don’t believe there is another writer of any generation that can involve the reader, really absorb you into the story, the way Stephen can. Yeah, I’m a fan.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Michael Cornelison: Just to say “thank you” to all the people who have shown the old girl such respect over the years. And to you, Bernd, for a website that serves a noble purpose.

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