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Title: Autopsy room four (2008) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 7′
Director: Dave Gallant (Read interview)
Script: Dave Gallant
Cast: Louis Adams, Sandra Dacosta, Bear Sthaal, Ryan Kipp & Russel Harder
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She played in Nick Wauters‘ Dollar Baby Rainy Season as Lisa Graham.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Tawna Hutchinson: I am originally from Toronto, Canada and I have lived in Los Angeles for 9 years. Besides my acting, I am a personal trainer.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Rainy Season?

Tawna Hutchinson: I became involved with Rainy Season when I submitted my picture for a casting call. Nick (the director) said he liked my screams the best so I got the part.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Tawna Hutchinson: The part was already written when I auditioned for the role.

SKSM: You worked with Nick Wauters on this film, how was that?

Tawna Hutchinson: Nick was a great director. Very clear on his vision and works very well with actors.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Tawna Hutchinson: There is one scene where we are running out of the living room, when the toads first crash through the window, and we ran so fast around the corner that a prop grandfather clock almost fell on me because we bumped into it. I always thought that if it had it would have made the scene really funny. Help!! Lisa is trapped by a clock. Forget the toads!!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Tawna Hutchinson: I unfortuately do not have contact with the other cast members. We only filmed for 2 days so it wasn’t really enough time to form strong bonds. I hope they are all doing well.

SKSM: What did you do after Rainy Season?

Tawna Hutchinson: After Rainy Season, I toured Los Angeles with an improv troup, wrote and starred in a sketch comedy series on public access and did a few other independent films and commercials.

SKSM: If you lived in a town like Willow, and you knew about the toads, would you stay?

Tawna Hutchinson: NO WAY!!! I would never stay in a town that rained toads!!

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Tawna Hutchinson: Yes I am a fan of Stephen King novels. Carrie was always my favourite to read. I always found something knew each time that I read it.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Tawna Hutchinson: To the fans of Rainy Season: Thanks so much for watching. Supporting small independent films is greatly appreciated. Hopefully I will get to do another Stephen King film and give you all another interview soon.

He is the man behind Night Surf Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Stephen W. Parkhurst: Like Stephen King, I’m a native Mainer. I grew up in a tiny town about forty minutes south of Bangor. I just moved back to Maine, Portland specifically, after graduating with my Bachelor’s degree in Film Production this May. I’ve got a lot of family and friends in the area, and seemed like it would be fun to come home for a little while. Unfortunately Maine, while lovely and all, is completely devoid of a film industry, hence my currently working at a hotel, parking cars. That’s why I decided to take matters into my own hands and make “Night Surf”.

SKSM: When did you make Night Surf? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Stephen W. Parkhurst: This project actually had a really long gestation period. I’d been considering doing the film for about a year and a half, and had toyed with several different short stories and scripts. Given how long I spent just thinking about it, when I finally decided to actually do it, the whole project came together in a timespan of only about two months. The production was really small. Just in April I’d finished the most expensive, elaborate film I’ve ever done. We had a fifteen person crew, eighteen actors, about twenty five locations, we shot on 16mm film, we blew up a car, etc. etc. It was small by real movie standards, but big for me. So I wanted to keep this one really small and intimate, which seemed appropriate for the story, anyway. We shot over the first two weekends of November, we only had four cast members and five crew members. We shot on digital, a lot of guerilla filmmaking. It only ended up costing about four or five hundred dollars, total. I edited the movie extremely fast, mainly because I was borrowing a really nice NLE system, and the owner was hounding me to give it back. So I ended up editing the whole thing in less than a week, with the majority of it being done over a marathon 48 hour session.

SKSM: How come you picked Night Surf to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Stephen W. Parkhurst:Night Surf” was always my top choice after I read it. I think it’s one of Stephen King’s best short stories. It’s a very melancholy and matter-of-fact story where not a lot really happens, yet it’s very engrossing. I like the characters, even Bernie. Though the guy is kind of an asshole, you still have to feel bad for him, for all of them. I kind of have a thing for themes of isolation and loneliness, and “Night Surf” definitely has those. I also love any good story about the apocalypse. It also helped that the story takes place in Portland, which made for some easy location scouting.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Stephen W. Parkhurst: I honestly don’t remember how exactly I found out about the Dollar Baby program. I think I just happened to come across it on a website one day. Wikipedia, maybe. It was while I was still in school, and I do remember immediately thinking, “Well, I know what my next project will be.” Every Mainer has this very possessive thing about Stephen King. We all think he belongs to us, and ever since I’ve wanted to direct movies, I’ve wanted to do a King adaptation.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Stephen W. Parkhurst: Nothing terribly exciting happened during the filming. It’s actually probably the best filming experience I’ve had thus far. Everyone got along, we secured all the locations we needed, people showed up on time, we finished ahead of schedule. Kind of odd, really. I do feel kind of bad about one thing; Chester, the guy who plays Alvin, had to stand in an actual fire. It was fairly small, and we had extinguishers and whatnot, but he was a real trooper, stood there long after any sane person would have leaped out. The fire actually started to get pretty big before we could convince him to climb out. Of course, I barely used any of that footage. So basically he risked his life, or at least his leg hairs, for no reason.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Stephen W. Parkhurst: It would definitely be cool to see all the Dollar Babies in some format or other. I personally would like to see the other “Night Surf“‘s in particular. I really have no idea if it will ever change, I’m sure there are a lot of legal issues involved. I don’t really want to bite the hand that feeds, though. It’s incredibly cool of Stephen King to allow people to shoot adaptations of his work. He’s arguably the most famous living writer on the planet, and he certainly has no obligation to do something like the Dollar Baby program. I’m just grateful that he’s still doing it after so many years. He’s a very philanthropic guy.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Stephen W. Parkhurst: As of writing this, I’ve just sent the DVD to his office last week. So I don’t know if he’s seen it yet, or ever will. I didn’t have any personal contact with Mr. King, instead I talked to his assistant, who was very kind and helpful in sending me the legal documents, and any information I requested. It is kind of amazing that, given the sheer scope of Stephen King, (he really is his own little empire) how accessible he still is, and how small his whole organization feels. I have seen Stephen King in person a couple times, once when he did a reading of “Peter and the Wolf” at the UMaine Center for the Arts, and once when the Rock Bottom Remainders came to Bangor. Basically, if you live in Maine long enough, you’re bound to run into King eventually. There’s just not that many people in this state.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Stephen W. Parkhurst: I don’t have any plans for another adaptation right at the moment, but I would definitely do it again, should inspiration strike. I was bummed when “1408” came out, because that was one of my favorite King stories, and I thought it would be a lot of fun to adapt. I almost did “The Road Virus Heads North” but my previous movie involved a lot of cars, and I was sick of shooting in them. If I had to pick one today, I’d love to try “The Raft” or “I Know What You Need“. “The Raft” could really be terrifying, and has a similar vibe to “The Mist“, while “I Know What You Need” would make for a great psychological thriller, with some opportunities for very dark humor.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Stephen W. Parkhurst: No, thank you, and keep up the good work with the website. I think saying I have fans is a bit of a stretch, unless you count my grandmother. She thinks I’m pretty swell. Anyone reading this who is thinking about doing a Dollar Baby, I highly recommend it. It’s a great opportunity, and not too many people get to say “yeah, I just wrapped up a Stephen King adaptation.” It definitely looks good on a demo reel.

Title: Night surf (2007)
Runtime: 10′
Director: Samuel Vary
Script: Samuel Vary
Cast: Zach Vary, Simon Vickery, Will Eberle, Bruce Osterling, Molly Jordan, Siobhan Anderson
Trailer
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He is the man behind In The Cutting Room Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Tyson Steigers: I am a 25 year old male currently living and working in Los Angeles. Professionally I am a motion graphic designer (sort of a blend of graphic design and animation for those who aren’t familiar), but I love all aspects of filmmaking. Recently I’ve been experimenting with stop motion animation, and try to produce/direct my own personal projects when I have the time.

SKSM: When did you make In The Cutting Room? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Tyson Steigers: In the Cutting Room was shot over the course of four weekends in January/February of 2005. We shot in Mt Hood Community College’s funeral services department outside of Portland, OR. Being my first live action production, as well as my senior film, I didn’t have much of a budget to work with. I did however have great equipment resources from school at my disposal, and a dedicated, talented crew to work with. I think when it was all said and done, we had spent just under $500.

SKSM: How come you picked In The Cutting Room to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Tyson Steigers: It’s funny, because as soon as I finished the story I started adapting the screenplay. I think it was the challenges that the story presented from a filmmaking perspective that were so appealing to me. From the very beginning I decided that I was not going to use any internal VO for Howard’s character, or any flashback scenes. While these techniques can be effective, especially in the case of a story like Autopsy Room Four, I felt that as a filmmaker, they seemed a bit cliche. I wanted to see this story translated to screen in a way that lets the audience figure out what’s going on for themselves as opposed to having all of the information handed to them.

SKSM: Why did you changed the orginal title “Autopsy Room Four” into “In The Cutting Room”?

Tyson Steigers: I thought that while my adaptation doesn’t stray too far from the original story, I did make some of my own decisions as to how the story would play out that differed from King’s version. While ultimately Autopsy Room Four was the primary inspiration for the film, I felt that my film was more inspired by, than it was based on the original story. So I stole the title of my first editing reel “In the Cutting Room” and left it at that.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Tyson Steigers: You know I didn’t really know until I got in contact with yourself. From the beginning I wanted to aquire rights for festival purposes, but being that it was a student project, my motivation for producing the film was more for expecience and exposure that for profit.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Tyson Steigers: I think that the fact that we were shooting in a fully functioning morgue, including the real bodies in the freezer is what really stands out to me overall. I’ll never forget the smell of the formaldehyde in the air that tainted all of our coffee and craft services.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a dvd or internet release would be possible?

Tyson Steigers: I would like to get the film out there, but I think having been a student work, I really haven’t had any time to make it a priority since my professional career began. There actually was a very limited DVD release when we screened the film in Portland in May of 2005. I have actually always wanted to put together an anthology, so who knows, maybe it’ll be a part of that.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Tyson Steigers: I sent out a bunch of letters and copies of the film to some of his people. Never heard back though, so I couldn’t tell you whether he’s seen it or not.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Tyson Steigers: No current plans, but I have thought about the possibility of producing The Road Virus Heads North.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Tyson Steigers: Be Cool

He’s the man behind the original movie “The Langoliers” & “Thinner”, based on King’s novell’s with the same title.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Tom Holland: I am a writer/director. I started out as an actor, working under the screen name of Tom Fielding. I was the juvenile in a movie called “A walk in the spring rain” with Tony Quinn and Ingrid Bergman. I wanted to direct and started writing to that end.

SKSM: When did you make Thinner & The Langoliers? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Tom Holland: Both films were done for a price. I shot the miniseries The Langoliers in 16 millimeter to save money. I don’t remember the cost of either one, but money was a constraint.

SKSM: How come you picked Thinner & The Langoliers into develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Tom Holland: I thought Langoliers had a very strong narrative line and was an audience pleaser. Thinner was always a difficult story. It had sat around for over ten years when I did it. It has been turned down by almost every director in Hollywood. I believe the reason was because it had a bitter ending.

SKSM: Do you might see a possibility to create a new Childs Play movie. And then with the old horror chucky and not the humor chucky. I may assume you saw the last one too and for me it was something to cry about. What Do you think of this all?

Tom Holland: I have heard they are talking about a remake of the original Childs Play. I have had nothing to do with any of the sequels.

SKSM: Did you change your mind about the gypsy spells and cursed dolls after making the movie Thinner and Child’s PLay ?

Tom Holland: LOL (laughing out loud) Sometimes I thought I was cursed with Thinner, especially when I was going through the audience testing process after the movie had been shot. Every audience hated the ending of the movie where the lead character, Billy Hallaeck, lost in his struggle to avoid the curse. The original ending, which was removed by the production company, had Billie’s daughter inadvertently eating the cursed pie. Knowing she was going to die, he, too, ate the pie, thereby committing suicide.

The moral of story, as Stephen King told, was that “moral jellyfish get crushed in the end.” Unfortunately the audience hated the moral. The experience has made me very leery of ever doing an ending where the protagonist loses.

SKSM: Most of your movies that you direct/wrote and act are from the horror/thriller gerne. Did you never thinking of making a comedy?

Tom Holland: Fight Night had a lot humor in it. But a straight broad comedy? No, I don’t think it’s my taste.

SKSM: What are your current plans? You didnt shót any movies since awhile? Are you retire from shooting movies?

Tom Holland: No, I am writing a movie at the moment and hope to secure financing.

SKSM: Why did you direct those stories? I mean, why the Langoliers & Thinners, and not others stories… what interest you in those stories?

Tom Holland: As I said, I thought Langoliers was a terrific story. As to Thinner, I thought it was a terrific character study, but in the end it was a commercial mistake because audiences rejected it, and in Hollywood, it is all about box office success.

SKSM: Some people think you are from the netherlands because of youre name, do you know whether your relatives are originally from the Netherlands?

Tom Holland: My mother’s maiden name was Schoonmaker, which I have been told was Dutch for Shoemaker. Yes, on my mother’s side we are Dutch.

SKSM: I always wondered how Bill Halleck’s (I think) Make-up was done. He starts out as a fat man, and he gets Thinner and thinner, and at a certain point he is so thin, creepy thin. I would like to know: How did you do this?

Tom Holland: It was done with a combination of a fat suit which was constantly thinner and the actor, Robert John Burke, losing weight. I shot as much in continuity as possible to help this affect.

SKSM: What was Stephen King’s reaction to the two movies that you made?

Tom Holland: I don’t know, but hew was present on both sets and was supportive and helpful.

SKSM: Are you plans to adapt another Stephen King book?

Tom Holland: No.

SKSM: When you are at home or going to the movies, what kind of movie genre would you prefer.

Tom Holland: I like horror, suspense and action, leavened with humor.

SKSM: Are there any movies that you have made, where you say now I would be done this diffrent?

Tom Holland: Yes, all of them. (grin) I don’t tank there is a director who wouldn’t like to go back and make their movies better. Also, the more you direct and the old you get, the more you know, so therefore you work should be better.

SKSM: You made in 1996 “Thinner” and “Driven” in 2006. What have you been doing between those years?

Tom Holland: Resting.

SKSM: You wrote the screenplay of “Class of 1984” What was Mark L. Lester thinking of it?

Tom Holland: Mark did a modern remake of “Black Board Jungle“.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Tom Holland: I think Langoliers was a success, Thinner less so. I wish the studio had left the original ending on Thinner. it was more faithful to the book.

He is the man behind Livraisons Matinales 

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself and your team? Who are you and what do you do?

Stephane Montel: My name is Stephane Montel, me and my teammates (Clementine Tronel, Florent Mack and Christian Radosaljevic) are just graduated of L’Institut Superieur d’Arts Appliqués of Paris. We studyed every aspect in the production of a 3d animation movie. Currently, we’re looking for a job in the filmmaking industry !

SKSM: When did you make Livraisons Matinales(Milkman 1)? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Stephane Montel: We made Livraisons Matinales this year, it took five months (from February to June) to make the movie, from the idea to the final cut. The film was made as our graduation movie for school. It didn’t cost a thing, unless several weeks without sleep and a harsh electricity bill due to the computers turned on every time ! It’s a real home made movie, all the team lived together during almost two months.

SKSM: How come you picked Livraisons Matinales(Milkman 1) to develop into a animation movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Stephane Montel: When we were looking for a scenario it happened that Clementine was reading a book gathering several novels of S.King. She told us about Livraisons Matinales. We all liked her and then we started to think about how to develop it into an animation movie. This novel was pretty cool to put on screen in a short time frame. King well describes the background, the mood, the characters but never go too far in the why/what/how blabla… so you have everything you need to turn the story in the way you want without being annoyed by useless details.

SKSM: Your movie is not a dollar baby like all other dollar babies. How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Stephane Montel: I just be aware of this when i watched your website. We didn’t know there were such a deal. It’s great that S.King share his work and his talent with some junior filmmaker, few people do that in the industry.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Stephane Montel: Making a movie is a time eater. When the deadline comes, you don’t see your family, you don’t see your friends… You live for the hope of finishing it. You make joke that only your teammates can understand and you can sink in the deepest sadness for the little bug you didn’t see. It’s very emotive !

SKSM: Are there things cut out of the movie that you miss now?

Stephane Montel: No, all we have made is in the movie. But for my part, just switch the ending music of Hermann Hermitt “There is a kind of hush” by the other title of the same artist “No milk today”.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can see your movie? Do you like the attention of your film around the world?

Stephane Montel: Yes of course, when you spend so much time on a project the best reward is when your movie can be see by a lot of spectators and when you received feedback, good or wrong. The Stephen King’s fans i could show the movie in France were particulary positive about it. I guess they saw too much very bad movies based upon Stephen King’s stories… We also hope that the movie will be selected for animation film festivals around the world.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie-animation? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Stephane Montel: Absolutly not. We tried to create a topic about the film on the official stephen king message board but it never appeared, i gess the moderators did not validate him. If you guys have any tricks to contact Stephen King, tell us ! It would be great if he could see our movie.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Stephane Montel: Currently we don’t have any project on an other Stephen King’s story. But a lot of Stephen King fans in France told me that the short story “Monkey” would be a good choice… Livraisons Matinales will maybe give ideas to other students in filmmaking and animation to work on a Stephen King’s story.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Stephane Montel: Do you know someone at Pixar or Dreamworks ? I hope you will enjoy watching the films as much as we enjoyed to make it. Thank to mister King to have made such good stories and thank to you !

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