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He is the man behind Suffer The Little Children Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Bernardo Villela: I am a filmmaker. I studied at Fairleigh Dickinson- Madison and then transferred to CW Post- Long Island University where I graduated in May 2005. I have been writing and yearning to make movies since I was fourteen and Suffer the Little Children is without a doubt my proudest achievement.

SKSM: When did you make Suffer the Little Children? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Bernardo Villela:Suffer the Little Children” was shot over 8 days in August 2005 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. We shot on a DVX 100A. Our brilliant cast is lead by Angela Pietropinto as Miss Sidley, Chris Lutkin as Mr. Hanning, Bob Bowersox as Buddy Jenkins, last but certainly not least Adam Montgomery as Robert. Our special effects were done by Temporal Distortions F/X.

SKSM: How come you picked Suffer the Little Children to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Bernardo Villela:Suffer the Little Children” is my favorite short story in the Nightmares and Dreamscapes collection. I believe it’s just a flat out masterpiece. It is a simple story to follow on the surface but it goes knee-deep into ambiguity by leaving you guessing as to whether Sidley is ill or if her students really do change. I’ve read it many times and have come out thinking both at the end. After all you can assume that Jenkins merely developed the same acute psychosis that Sidley has.

It is also probably the most visual and dramatic of the stories I was considering. There are many great images and scenes already in the text that are quite cinematic. I believe my only other viable option was “The Last Rung on the Ladder“, while it’s a beautiful, tragic tale it didn’t have the same visual appeal or as linear a plot, as Ladder would need to be told mostly in flashback.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Bernardo Villela: That’s actually a funny story. The “One Dollar Adaptation” is something I heard online but never found out if it was true. When Stephen King’s official website opened up a message board I decided to get to the bottom of it. His assistant confirmed it was true and the rest is history.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Bernardo Villela: The best moment for me on set was watching Angela and Adam (Sidley and Robert) doing their takes for the scene where Sidley keeps Robert after school, where Robert asks Miss Sidley if she’d like to see him “change.” It was a scene I thought most about and they delivered more than I ever imagined. Everyone, cast and crew was all about bringing the story to life and thinking about how to make the film all it could be. Angela suggested Sidley have a picture of her brother on the dresser and Adam suggested a name for Sidley’s substitute which she erases on her first day back. It was great to have everyone so dedicated to making the story come alive.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a dvd/video release would be possible?

Bernardo Villela: We are very confident in this film. All the performances in the film are fantastic, the effects look great and it is quite frightening. We are targeting many film festivals for submission and hopefully Suffer will reach many festival screens, and thus, many fans. Fans will be notified of future screenings at our website www.sufferproductions.com. If it does well and Stephen King likes it, we may ask permission for distribution but that’s down the road some. Many people we’ve spoken to about the film are excited just by the fact that we chose this particular story so I am hopeful.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Bernardo Villela: No, I didn’t. We are still in the editing process as we speak and when we have completed the cut I am planning on sending him the DVD and a copy of the script.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Bernardo Villela: Wow, that’s a great question. I’ve been a fan of Stephen King’s for a long time so many of his stories have struck me as possible adaptations that I’d want to do down the road with exclusive rights and the ability to distribute. My dream choice would probably be Roadwork. I’ve read it twice and I could probably read it again in a heartbeat. I think it’s a great and underrated tale of one man fighting the system and to hold on to his past. The fact that it’s overlooked makes me appreciate it even more than other stories I like just as much if not more like The Long Walk, Gerald’s Game and The Dark Tower III and IV, because they’re so well known.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Bernardo Villela: I hope that fans of the story do get a chance to see this film. I worked with people who were both fans of King and those who only read the story because they were working on it, and it was pretty much unanimous that Sidley, Hanning, Robert and Jenkins were all perfectly cast. Also, there are no major story changes here. This is the story you’ve read with but a few minor changes, like a less ambiguous ending that I will not give away, to make it more cinematic. I know some adaptations of his work have been quite disappointing. I don’t believe “Suffer the Little Children” falls into that category.

 

He is the man behind King’s short story The Revelations of ‘Becka Paulson.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Steven Weber: I am an actor who has worked in theatre, television and film for the last 25 years (resumé available on IMDB)

SKSM: When did you make The Revelations of ‘Becka Paulson? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Steven Weber: My association with Stephen King began before that when I did the miniseries version of “The Shining” (directed by Mick Garris). I found the original story in an anthology of horror and fantasy tales that I picked up and thought it would make a cool little film. I contacted the Outer Limits people, who I knew, and suggested the project. They liked it and off I went. The entire production was roughly two weeks (one week of pre-production and one week of shooting). I’m not sure what the cost was. It couldn’t have been much.

SKSM: How come you picked The Revelations of ‘Becka Paulson to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Steven Weber: I liked the humor in the writing and thought that The Outer Limits could use some humor ion their programming.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Steven Weber: Working with Catherine O’Hara was very special for me. I had always been a fan of hers and was very impressed with her choices and her ability. As it was my first experience directing, every moment was special.

SKSM: Are there things cut out of the movie that you miss now?

Steven Weber: I did a “director’s cut” that had a different approach to the overall editing of the episode that I preferred. I felt that the final product was a little too linear. I tried to enhance the feeling of the character’s insanity through editing and through funny off-beat music. The producers thought my choices were too odd and they wouldn’t pay for the rights to use the music, instead opting for more generic music. But enough of the elements I like have survived.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Steven Weber: I had no contact with him during the filming. I did, however, have a lot of contact with him during the filming of “The Shining” and found him to be extremely open, funny, approachable and fascinating. I think he liked “Revelations”. At least, I hope he did.

SKSM: How did you get started as a director and what do you do on a production?

Steven Weber: I started directing as a fluke, having been around it for so long a time as an actor. I absorbed aspects of it and always was observant and when the opportunity arose I leapt at it.

SKSM: Did you have any experiance making that kind of movies at the time?

Steven Weber: I had always been a fan of the horror/fantasy genre (I just wrote and acted in an episode of an upcoming series called “Masters of Horror” that was directed by Dario Argento. It seemed fitting that my first foray into directing would be something from that world.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Steven Weber: Not at this time.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Steven Weber: Only to say that Stephen King is worthy of all the adoration his fans have mustered and that he is as real and remarkable as any fan would hope him to be.

 

He’s the man behind the original 1984 movie “Firestarter“, based on King’s novell with the same title.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark L. Lester: I was born in Cleveland, Ohio in a not so rich family. We lived in the projects, but I later moved to LA and got into film. I now own a distribution company and still direct.

SKSM: When did you make Firestarter? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mark L. Lester: I made Firestarter in 1983 in North Carolina. It took us 10 weeks and cost us 10 million dollars.

SKSM: How come you picked Firestarter to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mark L. Lester: I was actually approached by Dino De Laurentiis to direct it. I didn’t pick it.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mark L. Lester: I do not have and projects lined up with King, but would do The Talisman which my son loved. It is however, I hear, already being adapted.

SKSM: How was it to work with the young Drew Barrymore: did you think then that she would become a great actress?

Mark L. Lester: She was great for an 8 year old. Wonderful to work with in every way. I knew she was destined for a long and eventful career in film.

SKSM: Are there things cut out of the movie that you miss now?

Mark L. Lester: Almost everything we shot made it into the final cut.

SKSM: Any funny bloopers?

Mark L. Lester: Not really. The actors were all very serious and dedicated to getting it right.

SKSM: What was Stephen King’s reaction to the movie?

Mark L. Lester: King didn’t approve at all and there was a big dispute between him and me in Fangoria Magazine. He doesn’t like many of the films based on his books though. He didn’t like the burning eyes and felt it strayed from his vision.

SKSM: Did you have any experiance making that kind of movies at the time?

Mark L. Lester: No, I had never shot a horror film before Firestarter.

SKSM: Did the actors do the stunts themselves?

Mark L. Lester: No, we used stunt doubles for almost every stunt and used a midget in a wig and costume to double for Drew.

SKSM: How hard was it to find these actors?

Mark L. Lester: Everybody was on board and loved the novel, but since it was a Universal picture the actor’s had large salaries. George C. Scott received 1 million dollars for just 3 weeks of filming.

SKSM: What do you think about the sequel: Firestarter Rekindled?

Mark L. Lester: I thought it was a nice effort, but nothing like the original. I suppose that’s because they didn’t have a novel to base that one upon.

SKSM: What movies did you make after Firestarter that we can know you from also?

Mark L. Lester: You can refer to www.imdb.com for a complete list. Just look up Mark L. Lester.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mark L. Lester: Tell them that I am extremely grateful for all their support. I think it’s great that they can get behind a film or person and support it/them so much. I’m forever in debt to you all. It would be nice if you could write letters to Universal asking them to do a reissue of the DVD with a commentary by me. I have asked Universal and need the fan support. Not to sound too conceded, but many fans would like an updated DVD version with special features.

Humbly,
Mark L. Lester

 

He is the man behind King’s short story Harvey’s Dream (El Sueño de Harvey).

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: My name is Rodolfo Guillermo Weisskirch; I am 21 years old and I live in Buenos Aires, Argentina. I’m in my last year of the Cinematography direction career at the University. I am also preparing two new shorts movies and finishing my second year thesis (“We Interrupt Our Program…“) and my career thesis, “Harvey’s Dream“.

SKSM: When did you make Harvey’s Dream? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Rodolfo Weisskirch:Harvey’s Dream” history started two years ago, on October, 2003, when I got the original story from Javier “Ziebal” Martos, a Spanish friend from a Stephen King’s Forum called “Kinghispano”. When I read the story I instantly thought in shooting it, but at that moment I was shooting “We Interrupt Our Program…”, and I postponed the project. Between February and April, 2004, I wrote the screenplay for my final thesis. In November, 2004, I started the preproduction with the help of Román Virgili, the actor’s and assistant director, Anahí Colombo, the first assistant director, Sol Damiani, the producer and Juan Cavia, one of the directors of photography.
During the last two weeks of November, three weeks of December and two weeks of January, 2005 we rehearsed with the actors: Hector Cesana, Estela Aurea Guelfi and Helene Grenbaum. The movie was shot between the last week of January and the first one of February and between the last week of February and the first one of March: they were nine hard days. It cost about 1000 pesos (US$ 350.00) and it was filmed with a Mini DV Digital Camera. I’m editing the movie as of May and I believe that will be finished (with sound, music, titles, subtitles and DVD included) by September.

SKSM: How come you picked Harvey’s Dream to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: When I choose any project, I always see what the story can transmit. I felt that “Harvey’s Dream” has a dense and tense climate. That was what attracted me. The relationship between the characters. This monotonous and boring marriage, falling in an abyss of non-dialogue, and suddenly bum! He wants to tell her, his dream, but very slowly. And the dream gets more and more scary. I really like the way she looks at him. A pessimistic vision of an American decadent middle class family due to government economic policies. It’s a very local, but also a very universal point of view.
The climate and the situation reminded me as of best of Bergman’s movies such as: “Autumn Sonata”, “Persona”, “Screams and Whispers” or “The Hour of the Wolf”.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: I knew about it thanks to Ariel Bosi from the “Kinghispano” forum who advised me to look into this website. They were wonderful news for me, because it’s very difficult for an Argentinian to buy the rights of any story and it’s harder to get a Stephen King one. I couldn’t send him the dollar yet, because Marsha DiFillipo never answered my letter about how I can send the dollar and where to.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: We have a lot of problems with the weather, because the days that we have to shoot outdoors, it was raining or very cloudy. It was also very hot and humid similar to the weather in the story. We have to interrupt shooting during the first week of February, because of the weather and after that, some of the crew members and the actors went away on vacation. We were lucky to start shooting again on the last week of February.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd release would be possible of on our website?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: I hope some day, people will be able to see the film anywhere.Perhaps, I can take the movie to a local film festival but I don’t know yet. First I will finish it and then I’ll see. I intend to release the DVD in your website soon.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: Only in my dreams. As Mrs. Marsha DiFillipo has never answered my letter I can’t expect Mr. Stephen King to ever write me. It would be great to meet him in the near future.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: No at the moment, but I like Stephen King’s stories and novels, and I hope to shoot another one.
I read the first chapter of his new book which is going around the Internet, “The Pulse”, and it’s very interesting. It has a big catch.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Rodolfo Weisskirch: I hope that someday anybody will be able to see the short movie in the website, please be patient (because probably it will be slow at the beginning) and enjoy it. I hope to see more short movies from the whole World and especially from Latin America.

 

 

He played in James Cole & Dan Thron‘s The Last Rung On The Ladder as Dad.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Nat Wordell: I am a graduate of The American Boychoir School, High Mowing School and Barrington College, I have been a teacher a music and theatre Arts in the Chatham Public Schools for the past 35 years.

SKSM: Did you have to audition or so for The Last Rung on the Ladder?

Nat Wordell: No Jim nabbed me.

SKSM: You worked with James Cole & Dan Thron on this film, how did you find that back at that time ?

Nat Wordell: They were students at the time and I was eager to help them in any of their pursuits.

SKSM: How was it to work/play with Melissa Whelden(Kitty) and Adam Houhoulis(Larry)?

Nat Wordell: I love these guys and they were and continue to be involved with what ever they do.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Nat Wordell: Having Jim Cole Try to direct me as he had a real image of what I should be. I know I failed him miserably.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time?

Nat Wordell: We are doing a big Show based on 38 years of theatre at Chatham High School This weekend and Jim forwarded me photos of Once Upon A Mattress which his was in.

SKSM: What did you do after The Last Rung on the Ladder?

Nat Wordell: I continue to direct High School Students and sing professional on Cape Cod.

SKSM: Are you (or where you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Nat Wordell: Absolutely!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Nat Wordell: “Live for the arts”‘ as I believe they represent the center of all we do!-

 

She is the composer of James Cole & Dan Thron‘s The Last Rung On The Ladder Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Anne Livermore: I am an IT professional in the Boston, Massachusetts area. I have a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a M.F.A. in Musicology from Brandeis University.

SKSM: How did you become involved with The Last Rung on the Ladder?

Anne Livermore: Jim Cole lived down the hall from me in the dormitory at UMass and asked me to write the music for The Last Rung on the Ladder.

SKSM: How did you get started as a composer and what do you do on a production?

Anne Livermore: I had been composing music since childhood and studied theory and composition throughout high school and college. I had never written music for a movie before, but I had some interest in operatic Broadway musicals such as Les Miserables, which are composed with music throughout and in some ways similar to movie scores.

SKSM: How did you get started to wrote about ten minutes of original music for the Last Rung on the Ladder?

Anne Livermore: Jim showed me the almost-finished film as inspiration. Since music strongly evokes emotion, we talked a lot about how he wanted the audience to feel about certain parts of the movie. I formed a rough idea about what kind of music I thought should go where and made notes as to the timing of events in the film. Then I went back to the practice rooms in the Fine Arts Center, sat down at a piano, and began to write. We were in a hurry, so there wasn’t a lot of back and forth between me and Jim about particular pieces of music. For the most part, Jim liked the music I wrote for the movie and he gave me a very free rein to make it the way I thought best. I wrote the music for the movie in about two weeks.

SKSM: Did you have contact with the actors/directors at that time, if so how was that? And what do you think of them?

Anne Livermore: Because I joined the movie after the filming was complete and the editing nearly so, I never met the actors, and my only contact with the others involved with the film was Jim. Jim of course is the director as well as the producer of the film, and it was an absolute joy to work for and collaborate with him. He is very intense and serious about film, but he is also very generous and funny.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moments that you would like to tell me about?

Anne Livermore: Yes, the actual recording of the music for the film stands out in my mind. A number of moments in the music were timed to specific moments in the film, so Jim and I really needed a place to record the music that had a good piano and some means for Jim to show the film so that I could see it while I played the piano score. The only place we knew of that met both requirements was the recital hall in the Fine Arts building at UMass, which had a performance-quality grand piano and a soundproof projection booth up at the back of the auditorium. As you might expect, the recital hall was very much in demand throughout the day for rehearsals, but through my Music Department connections I managed to reserve the hall one afternoon for about one hour and a half. Jim brought the film itself and music recording media, I brought the score, and we both brought our nerves of steel, and believe me, we needed them. And hour and a half sounds like a long time to record ten minutes of music, but it’s not. There’s always setup time, multiple takes of the music, and backtracking to correct mistakes. I hadn’t thought about this when I was writing the music, but since the music runs through much
of the film with only occasional breaks, the takes themselves were quite long. The longer the take, the harder it is to ensure a good performance. Jim was running the film up in the booth, but we couldn’t hear each other and so we were pantomiming at each other across the length of the auditorium and through the glass. In the end we got it done, and afterward we congratulated ourselves for a good product produced under less than ideal conditions. In retrospect we still laught about it.

SKSM: After the Last Rung on the Ladder did you write more music? If so what?

Anne Livermore: After The Last Rung on the Ladder I continued my undergraduate music studies, graduated, and went on to graduate school. It occurred to me somewhere along the line that as much as I love music, I am not willing to make the sacrifices required to pursue music as a professional career. I still compose occasionally, and I am very happy with the course I have chosen, learning a technical trade that interests me, marrying and starting a family.

SKSM: What do you think that after so many years there finaly a website is of Last Rung?

Anne Livermore: I’m thrilled. Helping Jim with The Last Rung on the Ladder was a high point of my college experience, and it’s such a pleasure to know that after all this time people are still interested in this little film.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Anne Livermore: Bernd, thank you for caring about it and making this happen.
Anne Livermore

 

Title: Gotham café (2005) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 14′
Director: Jack Sawyers 
Script: Peter Schink, Julie Sands & Bev Vincent
Cast: Chaney Kley, Julie Sands, Cullen Douglas, Kevin Brief, Mick Garris, Stephen King, Endre Hules, Robert Axelrod, Denny Hankla, Bryan McMahon, Kathryn McGrew, Steve Wozniak, Richard B. Rudolph, Pamela Denise Weaver, Natalie Tapia, Joanne Azoo, Kristi E. Bailey, Robert David Cochrane, Melissa K. Cyrnek, Daniel E. Diaz, Johnny Drocco, Eric Flenner, Kristy Fuchs, Kali Hawk, Brittany Ann Hoeks, Laura Hope, Russ Hunt, Lance Irwin, Evi Jacobs, Leslie Keel, Mike Kirkland, Jill Lawson, Bryan Lyles, Maureen Malone, Jamie L. McGrew, Chad Mehle, Aimee Mossa, Ashley Niles, Annamaria Pandullo, Helia Rafaeil, J. Roberts, Peter Samet, Mark Saefer, Amanda Fay Sheiman, Laura L. Theune, Sara Ann Thomas, Laura Ann Tull, Abigail Young.
Trailer
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He is the man behind King’s short story Chattery Teeth.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mick Garris: I am a Los Angeles native who writes, produces and directs films and television. I have been writing since I was twelve years old, which is also when I started making little 8mm movies. I have been making films professionally for almost 20 years.

SKSM: When did you make Chattery Teeth? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mick Garris: “Chattery Teeth” was originally going to be a pilot for a television series, a sort of horror anthology. It was originally commissioned by the ABC television network. John McTiernan was going to produce and direct it, and I was just writing and creating the series. The network decided not to make the pilot (at that time, they never would have made a horror series).

Later, the Fox television network wanted to make it as a two-hour movie, and I went to Clive Barker and got his short story, “The Body Politic”, and added it to “Chattery Teeth”, so that now the movie consisted of two stories, as well as a bridging device of the Christopher Lloyd character, a mysterious fellow who travelled the country telling cautionary tales to his “victims”.

My original title for the show was ROUTE 666, but we ended up calling it QUICKSILVER HIGHWAY. It was released in some territories as EVIL HIGHWAY.

We shot and released it in 1997.

SKSM: How come you picked Chattery Teeth to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mick Garris: I really enjoyed the audaciousness of the story, the unbelievable made believable that is King’s expertise. It was just a really fun little horror story. And I wanted to make something with the crew that had just done THE SHINING with me. King was kind enough to sell us the story, and that was the beginning. It’s the kind of story you tell around the campfire, sort of an urban legend, and I loved the fact that it was set in the desert. I love what I call “desert noir”.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mick Garris: I hate to disappoint you, but I can’t remember anything particularly hilarious or fascinating that happened, as it’s been while now, and it’s so much work to make a film on a television schedule that there’s no time.

SKSM: Are there things cut out of the movie that you miss now?

Mick Garris: Actually, I believe that everything that we shot is in the movie. There were a couple of smaller details that were cut from the television broadcast, but it’s all there on the video.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Mick Garris: Although King was around during most of the production of THE SHINING right before we made QUICKSILVER, he was not present on the set of QUICKSILVER HIGHWAY. Since he had not written the screenplay, and was not really involved in the production, he doesn’t really like to travel and be away from home for any length of time. However, he did tell me at the time that he really enjoyed it.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories after Desperation? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mick Garris: I have made my two favorite King books: THE STAND and THE SHINING miniseries. And it’s at the point that I’ve made more King movies than any other kind. I would love the chance to make BAG OF BONES, but I think that’s being made by others.

SKSM: Did you have any experiance making that kind of movies at the time?

Mick Garris: A lot. Most of the movies that I’ve made since I started directing in 1986 have been in the horror genre. And several of them had been King projects.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mick Garris: Just that I am one of you. I’m a King fan who is lucky enough to have directed more films based on his work than anyone.

He is the man behind La Femme Dans La Chambre Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Damien Maric: I’m 26 years old; I have created with a friend WIP STUDIO with the purpose of developing some television projects, cinema and publishing. In fact everything related to entertainment, I love that. A little like Peter Pan, I don’t want to grow up so I like to have fun and dream.

SKSM: When did you make La Femme dans la chambre? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Damien Maric: I finished directing “La Femme dans la chamber” in March 2005. It took me 3 years to find the money; it was difficult since everyone was afraid of going into such an adventure with a “young kid”, in fact, at the time, I was 22. But sometimes destiny puts you on your road, people that changes your life. Frank Darabont was one of these people. When I received his letter, I understood that everything was possible. The film cost me 10 000 euros and the shooting’s duration was 5 days.

SKSM: How come you picked The woman in the room to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Damien Maric: I admit adoring and having read many times “Night Shift“. In this short story, there is no monster or evil clown, just a little boy and this woman in a hospital bed. That’s also the Stephen King that I like: more “human”. The monster here, is the sickness.so, the use of special effects is essentially concentrated on the mood, the lighting, the shadows, which represent the death surrounding everything, the inhuman distortion of faces which represent suffering and of course the character’s nightmares.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Damien Maric: In 1999, I went to Los Angeles for a stage at FOX on the X-Files series, then at WARNER for different jobs. At the time when I arrived, WARNER was finishing production on The Green Mile, directed by Frank Darabont. I was reading Stephen King books in English to learn the language better. I loved developing stories so I asked for the rights of one of the “Night Shift: stories and chose “Room 312”. I contacted by chance Marsha De Fillipo who told me that Frank Darabont owned the rights for this short story, and that I had to contact him. I came back to France and used to work for a cinema magazine. Slowly, I worked on a storyboard and send it to Frank Darabont and Denise Huth in the united states and, in March 2001, he gave the rights, for free.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Damien Maric: I had many problems in the shooting and in post-production too, like if I was cursed. Filming in a hospital with such a tiny budget is really hard. Other than the fact that we had to finish everything at 19h, the hospital is near the Orly airport! So we had to deal with daily sounds of planes taking off, so we had to use a chronometer sometimes to finish at the exact second, the sound engineer was going crazy! And to make it worse, we had to deal with a storm while shooting a scene in exterior, a tour nearly fell and crashed with all the spots on it. The camera also broke down while shooting. Then in post-production, We had a fire to deal with and many other problems. The funniest thing is that I saw Lost in La Mancha and it reminded me of our shooting! But hope is a good thing and the work of everyone in the crew, made us succeed. It’s in fact my best memory, this crew’s work.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd release would be possible?

Damien Maric: I’m very happy, that with this website, I’m going to show them this short. I’d love to continue and make other films. We have many feature films projects. I’d like to thank Frank Darabont and Denise Huth for their help, meet them and maybe work with them on a project. Who know?

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Damien Maric: No, not with Stephen King, but with Marsha De Fillipo to ask her some questions and with Denise Huth to send her photos and storyboard.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Damien Maric: I would love to make The Girl who love Tom Gordon for the cinema and make a TV series out of “Night Shift“. We’re working on it. I’d like to make a link between the USA and EUROPE, I’m sure we can make great things together.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Damien Maric: One Day, Andy Dufresne told: “hope is a good thing”, I think he’s right. You must believe, sooner or later you can do it, it’s sometimes hard, it sometimes takes time, but when the work is over and that we think about it all, we can say: “it was a superb experience”. Thank you Stephen King, Thank you Frank Darabont, Thank you Denise Huth, Thank you Marsha De Fillipo, you just changed my life. Thanks.

Translated by Jeremy Guerineau & Antoine Waked

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