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He is the Assistant Director in Paul Inman‘s That Feeling Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Marshall O. Wells: Hello, I’m Marshall and I’m married to my wonderful wife, Allison, and I’m a father of 4. While attending Clemson University I started to work in the video production department on campus. That is when I got hooked on the world of video production. At that time I was helping on a show that the university was producing for tv and the start of the web, this was before YouTube. After leaving Clemson I helped to co-open my own video production business. In the course of business, I had the opportunity to produce a film. This was lots of fun and lots of work. I eventually closed my business, but I still love to be involved in films and short films are a great way to make that happen. I try to work on at least one short a year to scratch that itch.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an assistant director?

Marshall O. Wells: In the course of working with Paul about what roles he needed on his short, I offered to be the AD. This is a role that I have done a few times and really enjoy keeping the bus rolling.

SKSM: Could you talk about your experience in the shooting of That Feeling?

Marshall O. Wells: It was a small but excellent crew, a long but fun 9 days.

SKSM: You worked with Paul Inman on this film, how was that?

Marshall O. Wells: Being the AD, I was on set every day with Paul. He is a great trooper and has great vision and insight on how to get there. It was fun being his sounding board for all kinds of things along the way.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Marshall O. Wells: Not really, all the day sort of blurred together. They were long days.

SKSM: How would you adjust positions and controls of cameras, printers, and related equipment to change focus, exposure, and lighting?

Marshall O. Wells: Being AD, I was more in charge of making sure everything was moving along on set. I do remember running slate a few times, and making suggestions on angles or lighting but the scheduling was my main job.

SKSM: How do you confer with directors, sound and lighting technicians, electricians, and other crew members to discuss assignments and determine filming sequences, desired effects, camera movements, and lighting requirements?

Marshall O. Wells: I have always tried to come to a film set with an open mind. One of the things that I have learned about myself over the years is I love to see other people’s visions come to life. So I approach it like that. I’m willing to add my options to the mix and be a sounding board for anyone that is on set.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Marshall O. Wells: My full time job is a project manager for a software development company but I always have my eye out for upcoming shorts that might be fun to work on. I also freelance shoot at sporting events for the networks or schools.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Marshall O. Wells: I’m boring, so I’m not sure.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Marshall O. Wells: Enjoy That Feeling: there was a lot of time and effort that went into it’s making.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Marshall O. Wells: Go Tigers!

He played in Paul Inman‘s That Feeling Dollar Baby film as Father.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Gregory French: I am Gregory French. I am an actor, stunt man, writer, director, producer, and all-around movie nerd!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Gregory French: I was always performing around the house when I was little. If I ever found a camera or tape recorder lying around I would use it to make videos or audio recordings and put on Little shows for myself. I recently found one from when I was 4 or 5. It was actually pretty Good!

Then in Elementary school found I was always getting cast in their productions. But I guess the real acting bug bit me when I was in 5th grade and I got the role of Lewis in our high school’s production of “The King and I”. From then on I was always looking for an audience to be in front of.

SKSM: How did you become involved in That Feeling Dollar Baby film?

Gregory French: Paul and I have known each other for years and have worked together on a many films. I was in “The Non-Dead” and “Mime over Magic” both of which he wrote and directed, and he directed one that I wrote and starred in called “Thirst of the Dead” and was assistant director on “The Vegetarian” which I also wrote. We were both founding members of Coastal Independent Films and had the opportunity to work together on many of their productions.

When he got the rights to “That Feeling” he asked me to help him with some of the pre-production and offered me the role of Caroline’s father.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Gregory French: Without giving too much away, I think it is all about that “Inner voice” that we all have. Sometimes we listen to it- sometimes we don’t. Except, in true Stephen King fashion, we discover that Caroline’s inner voice is a little different than most.

I also think the “Groundhog Day” effect in this film is a great choice. Each time we see the story play through we see slight changes and start to notice details we missed the first time, allowing us to learn more about the characters and what is really happening to them. It is an interesting way to tell a story that I think the audience will love.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Gregory French: I did not audition for it. Although it wasn’t written for me, I think Paul knew it would be a good fit for me based on our mutual acting history and offered me the role.

SKSM: You worked with Paul Inman on this film, how was that?

Gregory French: Paul is great! His writing and directing style is very laid back. He knows exactly what he wants and how to pull that specific performance out of his actors, but he is also open to new interpretations of the characters by the actors.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Gregory French: Nothing comes to mind. We were on such a tight shooting schedule that there wasn’t a lot of time for much fooling around. I’m not saying it wasn’t fun- far from it! But we were all there to work and make an amazing film in a short amount of time.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Gregory French: Yes. Many of us were friends before this film and continue to hang out. There are not a lot of filmmakers in our area, so we all tend to stick together.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Gregory French: Coastal Independent Films is always in production on something, so that keeps me busy. I also just landed a role in “Hot Christmas” (working title) which will be in production through February

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Gregory French: I grew up in the 80’s so Stephen King was HUGE for me! The only books I would willfully read as a kid were Stephen King books.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Gregory French: I’m an open book. I don’t think there are any surprises left that everyone doesn’t already know!

But my Daughter just got accepted at SCAD (Savannah College of Art and Design) for performing arts, which I think is a pretty big deal! She is WAY more talented than me, and my wife and I are both very proud of her for chasing her dreams.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Gregory French: I hope you really enjoy watching this film as much as we enjoyed making it! Join us for the premier on Wednesday November 10th at 7pm at the Market Common Theater!

He played in Paul Inman‘s That Feeling Dollar Baby film as Copilot.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Deak J. Smalls: My name is Deak J. Smalls, I am an actor and at times a humorist from Charleston, SC. I was sent by baby Jesus to be an entertainer in this world.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Deak J. Smalls: I’ve wanted to become an entertainer in acting ever since I was in the second grade. Started taking the craft professionally in the beginning of 2013.

SKSM: How did you become involved in That Feeling Dollar Baby film?

Deak J. Smalls: I got involved with this project when I sent off my audition to wyfp pictures through email. If I’m not mistaken I believed I auditioned for another role, unfortunately I didn’t get the part but Mr. Paul saw something in me that he still wanted to work with me on this project.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Deak J. Smalls: Honestly, I think given the fact this story came from the creative mind of Mr. King himself automatically brought readers to wanting to know what he has in store for us readers. The imagination Mr. King can conduct will definitely have the fans wanting to know how another one of his masterpieces will be portrayed on the big screen.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Deak J. Smalls: I definitely had to work my butt off in my audition for this project just like everyone else I’m sure. Again, like I said I initially tried out for another role but Paul appreciated my performance he offered me another role in this production. And I am very grateful.

SKSM: You worked with Paul Inman on this film, how was that?

Deak J. Smalls: Working with Paul in the amount of time I did was simply amazing and informative for me. Watching him work and staying true to the story was incredible for me to say the least. You can tell how much he wants to tell this story in the authentic way possible in honoring Stephen King.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Deak J. Smalls: My scene partner, Patrick Herrmann was an absolute kook to work with… In a good way haha. We definitely had a lot of fun behind the scenes and kept each other on our toes while filming. Especially during the scenes of us closed in in that small cockpit.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Deak J. Smalls: Not as much as I do keeping up with mostly Mr. Paul. I’m sure everyone involved in this project are busy working on other things. Behind the scenes I’ve met a lot of amazing ppl, cast and in crew.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Deak J. Smalls: As of now I’m starting to work on a few other projects by the end of the year and next year. And still auditioning for other projects. So fingers crossed, you’ll see more of me.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Deak J. Smalls: What kind of question is that, of course I am a fan of the almighty Stephen King. I’ve grew up reading and watching his product such as IT, The Stand, Salem’s Lot, Carrie, The Shining, Pet Sematary, The Green Mile… one of my personal favorites, Later, The Outsider, TommyKnockers, the Mr. Mercedes trilogies and I actually loved Doctor Sleep despite of what critics may think about it. Stephen King is a genius and have and will forever be a force.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Deak J. Smalls: Not really so much of a secret to my close family and friends but I am a crier when it comes to watching compassionate flicks. And I am not ashamed. I’ve shed tears to such pictures as Fox and The Hound, the end of Avengers: Endgame, Ghost, Malcolm X and Bicentennial Man… Rest In Peace to the great Robin Williams.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Deak J. Smalls: Much love to the fans of all of The Almighty Stephen King’s work. I think you’ll absolutely love and appreciate this picture That Feeling. Thank you for showing love and continue to be supportive and I can’t wait for you all to see what we bring to this wonderful project.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Deak J. Smalls: Thank you to stephenkingshortmovies.com and thank you to the whole cast and crew who were involved in front and behind the camera in making this film and a big big shoutout to Mr. Paul Inman and Wyfp pictures for believing in me for what I contributed to this film. Follow me on every platform @deakjsmalls (Instagram, Twitter) on everything.

She palyed in Paul Inman‘s That Feeling Dollar Baby film as The Nurse.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Cynthia Morris: I grew up on a farm in rural Oklahoma and worked as a research scientist for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. After watching a Nicholas Sparks movie filmed in coastal North Carolina, I decided to visit the filming locations. I fell in love with the area and bought a beach house two days after arriving!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Cynthia Morris: Even though I dreamed about being an actress when I was younger, I was very busy with my family and career. Only after retiring and moving to North Carolina did I realize that it’s never too late to pursue your dreams!

SKSM: How did you become involved in That Feeling Dollar Baby film?

Cynthia Morris: I had previously worked with Paul on a couple of short films and when I found out he was working on That Feeling, of course I wanted to be involved. After all, this is.a Stephen King story! Paul invited me to be props manager/set design, and to audition when casting was announced.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Cynthia Morris: I believe it’s something we can all relate to on some level. We all have to make choices in life and sometimes they are quite difficult. Love, loss, disappointment, and grief are all part of the human experience. That Feeling portrays all of these and more from one woman’s world.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Cynthia Morris: After I auditioned for another role, Paul asked if I would be interested in The Nurse. As you will see,  Paul and the casting team made excellent choices for all of the roles.

SKSM: You worked with Paul Inman on this film, how was that?

Cynthia Morris: Working with Paul was amazing as well as very educational, both on camera and off. Paul is a very talented writer and director with the ability to visualize every detail of each scene.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Cynthia Morris: Prior to filming, Paul called to ask what size scrubs I needed for The Nurse’s wardrobe.  I was thinking a white dress like Louise Fletcher/Nurse Ratched in ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’.  After sending him photos, Paul agreed to compromise with me. He got scrubs, but they were white!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Cynthia Morris: I have maintained contact with Paul and much of the crew, mostly on social media.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Cynthia Morris: I recently was recently cast in a support role in an Independent feature film which should start filming after Thanksgiving.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Cynthia Morris: I’m and avid reader and Stephen King has always been one of my absolute favorite authors.  I prefer reading the story before watching the movie. And yes, I did read That Feeling.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Cynthia Morris: I am an award winning author.  ‘Shadow of an Indian Star’ won an IPPY Award for Best Regional Fiction in the Mid West in 2006.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Cynthia Morris: It’s never too late to pursue your dreams! DREAM BIG!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Cynthia Morris: I think you’re going to like this!!

He is the Composer in Paul Inman‘s That Feeling Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Gary M Thomas: I’m a film composer living and working in coastal South Carolina (USA). I’ve been involved in scoring films for a number of years, working with independent filmmakers on numerous film projects and online television series.

SKSM: How did you become involved with That Feeling?

Gary M Thomas: I’ve worked with writer/director Paul Inman on many of his past films and was delighted when he approached me about writing the music for “That Feeling.” In addition to scoring the film, I was fortunate to be able to help with the preproduction and assisted on the set during filming as well.

SKSM: How did you get started as a composer and what do you do on production?

Gary M Thomas: Well, I’ve had a very strong interest in music since my childhood. I first became involved in electronic music synthesizers and keyboards in my teenage years, eventually pursuing work with local bands. For many years, I settled into performing in the local music scene while studying composition and improvisation with local music professionals. For about a year, I left my roots and traveled with a touring variety band, an amazing experience which I will treasure forever. My interest in film music actually started in the mid 1990s when I first began working with MIDI sequencers, samplers and digital orchestration. Since that time, I’ve been writing, arranging and recording film music cues, working with independent filmmakers on their projects and online TV series. My main focus and goal is to create original and innovative music which will effectively support and enhance the filmmaker’s vision.

SKSM: How did you get started to write the Soundtrack for That Feeling?

Gary M Thomas: Before the production ever started, I received a copy of the script from Paul and read through it. I began getting a few early musical ideas and tried to envision how these cues would fit behind the images. This process is the best way to get initial ideas which could develop into complete musical passages within the completed score. After the filming was finished and the first edit was complete, Paul and I watched the film together and discussed where the music should be placed and how it would best fit into each scene. Being a musician himself, Paul had some great ideas regarding the instrumentation and timbres used in specific scenes. I then received a copy which allowed me to begin the composing and recording process.  Throughout any small edits which followed, only slight adjustments and tweaks were made to the music to align with the changes and sync with the picture.

SKSM: Is this your most challenging audio so far?

Gary M Thomas: I’d say it’s certainly one of the most involved scores so far. Composing with virtual orchestral instruments and arranging them for placement within the musical canvas can be a bit daunting. Often times, achieving a natural sounding blend between sound design, ambient effects and actual instruments can take a lot of patience and determination. So, in a way, I guess “challenging” would be an appropriate word to describe it. So often I’d find myself recording and rerecording the same musical passage over and over again trying to get that exact desired sound. With the magic of multitrack computer recording, it’s not a big issue to erase and rerecord a section time and time again. However, I think I probably drove my wife crazy playing the same sections over and over and over… LOL!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the music that you would like to tell me about?

Gary M Thomas: There weren’t many funny moments, other than driving my wife crazy with the constant repetitions. There were a few special moments when I felt the music and picture seemed to fit extremely well together, complimenting each other perfectly. For example, in many of the emotional scenes, I felt the orchestral strings helped add to the already intense sentiment of the moment. Additionally, along with the sound design ambience, the strings were used in many of the deja vu sequences to create background textures and add to the mood. One other moment worth mentioning is during the climactic ending scene where I felt the brashness of the instruments combined with the aleatoric string patterns helped created a real sense of fear and distress.

SKSM: After That Feeling did you write more music? If so what?

Gary M Thomas: I don’t currently have any new projects since completing the music for “That Feeling” but yes, I’m always writing new music. That’s just a normal part of my day, sitting down at the keyboard and composing new ideas.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Gary M Thomas: So lately, I’ve been spending most of my time working with my collection of piano libraries and slightly less of the orchestral samples. I guess it’s kinda like a cool down time for me after completing this project. Sometimes, I find it very therapeutic to sit down and write some melodies for solo piano without layering orchestral tracks behind them. In fact, I’ve just recently completed sketching out a few new compositions using only piano. These ideas could be further developed and possibly used on future projects as needed.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Gary M Thomas: Yes, indeed!  I’d say “The Shining” is probably my favourite.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Gary M Thomas: Hmmm, possibly that I’ve been vegetarian for almost three quarters of my life. Yep, I started in high school and have continued for over 46 years. Wow, that makes me sound so old, doesn’t it? LOL!

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be musicians?

Gary M Thomas: First and foremost, be seriously dedicated to your talent and apply yourself to improving your skills every day. Expose yourself to all types of music and learn as much as possible from each genre. Aim to be creative, innovative and unique with your talent. Whenever possible, network with and spend time performing with other likeminded musicians to gain knowledge of different performing styles. If you are planning to pursue scoring to picture, I highly recommend studying, listening and learning from the works of master film composers as a guide to your own musical advancement. Remember to always be diligent and don’t ever give up on your talent.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Gary M Thomas: Thank you so much for giving me this unique opportunity to share a little information with the readers. I’m hoping that everyone will get the opportunity to see “That Feeling” and will enjoy the film as much as I enjoyed composing the music.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Gary M Thomas: Again, thank you very much.

She played in Amy Nigro’s Cain Rose Up Dollar Baby film as House Mother.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Rhoda Pell: I gave up on acting at 19, had a baby and started a 32 year career with AT&T. I retired after 9/11 and began background acting with central casting.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Rhoda Pell: Since I was 4.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Cain rose up Dollar Baby film?

Rhoda Pell: I belong to every casting service and have a commercial agent. I submit myself to all parts I fit as long as not too much dialogue or rehearsals. I think I booked the role based on my imdb and resume and headshots, which often happens.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Rhoda Pell: I didn’t go to a movie screening and don’t think I watched the whole film so I can’t answer that.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Rhoda Pell: I might have sent in a self tape…

SKSM: You worked with Amy Nigro on this film, how was that?

Rhoda Pell: She was very gracious and happy about my wardrobe choices and very appreciative of my commitment to my small but important role.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Rhoda Pell: Sadly my experience was very brief, but that’s how I like to roll.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Rhoda Pell: Sadly no.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Rhoda Pell: I’m busier now than ever before.tonight attending a red carpet premiere of “the obscured ” where I play one of my iconic characters-the motel owner. I finished 2 days and I am booked all next week on a Netflix people I worked with years ago are booking me out of the blue. I booked a UCLA thesis that’s paying me nicely with a self tape. It will be shooting just after my 74th birthday mid December. Music videos are my favorites. I’ve done over 150, the last one with twin tribes called fantasy is out now, and for king and country latest video is out where I play one of my specialties homeless. My music videos are linked on YouTube rhodapells cannel favorites.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Rhoda Pell: I am indeed have read most. I think The Stand is my favorite. A few years ago I had a great experience with the press event tie in to It 2, for 4 days I performed as the creepy old lady and people actually thought I was the actress in the movie.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Rhoda Pell: I’m happy to perform in the nude, and often have on true blood, westworld, milf, music videos etc.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Rhoda Pell: Check out my imdb, enjoy my demo reel and follow me on Instagram @rhodapell.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Rhoda Pell:  Thanx for your interest and contributions to art.

 

She played in Roman Alekseev‘s The Hammer Dollar Baby film as Norma.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Julia Alekseeva: I love watching movies, but I’m not actress. I’m veterinarian.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Julia Alekseeva: I never dreamed of becoming actress.

This is the only film in which I have starred.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The hammer Dollar Baby film?

Julia Alekseeva: My husband asked me to play in his film and I said ‘yes’.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Julia Alekseeva: Mysterious serial killer will always interest people. People love scary stories and unexpected plot twists.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Julia Alekseeva: Shooting a movie in normal mode has become problematic because of covid. Then Roman asked me to play the role of victim, but this was not originally in the plans. Actually I’m little afraid of camera.

SKSM: You worked with Roman Alekseev on this film, how was that?

Julia Alekseeva: It was exciting and sometimes fun. I felt insecure as actress. But my husband always supported me.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Julia Alekseeva: Sometimes we had to reshoot the scene because our cats were in the frame. They didn’t want to leave us and were very interested in what we were doing.

There is another interesting fact. Real blood was used to shoot the poster. First, my husband bought fake blood. But it spread over my face and did not look like the real one. Then I thought I had to do something about it. I’m a veterinarian and I can draw blood from a vein. My husband, by the way, is afraid of blood and does not like injections. I applied a tourniquet to myself and drew about 10 ml of blood from my own hand with a syringe. Then she squeezed it onto her head. My husband was shocked.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Julia Alekseeva: Of course. We live with Roman and cats. Their names are Lucifer and Oswald.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Julia Alekseeva: Now I’m not filming anywhere and I don’t know if I will.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Julia Alekseeva: Yes, I really love reading his books and watching the film adaptations.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Julia Alekseeva: I really know how to handle firearms.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Julia Alekseeva: Thanks for the questions. It was interesting to answer them. It was a completely new experience for me. Please don’t judge me harshly.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Julia Alekseeva: I wish you all a good mood and new scary stories. =)

He is the Cinematographer in Vyacheslav Vlasov‘s In The Deathroom Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Artem Mokevsky: Hello everyone. I am Artem Mokevsky. I’ve been doing videography for 10 years now. And recently became a musician

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a cinematographer?

Artem Mokevsky: As a child, every evening my father brought home new DVDs and I watched a large number of films. At some point, I wanted to evoke the same incredible emotions in people as I myself received from some masterpieces of cinema. But I only had enough opportunities to become a blogger, then it became my job

SKSM: How do you communicate with a director to design a visual strategy for a film?

Artem Mokevsky: Due to the lack of experience and self-confidence, we did not work out the visual component as deeply as we could. But at this stage of the creative path, the main task is to finish the product, and then analyze it and become better in the next projects

SKSM: You worked with Vyacheslav Vlasov on this film, what do you think the relationship between a director and a dp should be?

Artem Mokevsky: It doesn’t matter if it’s a big project with a multimillion-dollar budget or a “garage production”, relationships on the site should be primarily professional. If the team members are friends at the same time, then this can create a special chemistry, but should not interfere with the workflow. Also, absolutely all team members should know the scenario in order to be on the same wavelength. I can’t say that we managed to do it to the full, but an unsuccessful experience is a valuable experience.

SKSM: You worked in a Dollar Baby based on a Stephen King short story. It was your most challenging film?

Artem Mokevsky: Of course, this is the biggest challenge in my entire life (after the Unified State Exam). It is very difficult to get out of creative stagnation, work with equipment of a different level and organize a large number of people. It was the first time we did a full dubbing of the film because we did not record sound from a professional microphone on the spot.

SKSM: When you’re going to shoot, what are your favorite lenses? formats?

Artem Mokevsky: The format depends on the task. The choice of format and lenses directly depends on the idea.

Again, you need to have a lot of tools and be able to use them in order for real creativity to begin. We work with what we have.

I like wide-angle lenses of about 10-18 mm and art lenses created for specific effects.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Artem Mokevsky: The husband of the main and only actress came to the set, interfered with the filming process and gave unnecessary comments. We politely asked him to be silent, but to no avail. As a result, the actress herself swore at him and kicked him out. I love it when people prioritize

SKSM: Who are some of your influences (favorite dps/films)?

Artem Mokevsky: David Fincher (Fight Club, Social network), Guy Ritchie (rock’n’roller), Timur Bekmambetov (watches), Christopher Nolan (Interstellar), almost all of Makoto Shinkai’s works (Your name, weather child), Mr. Nobody. I can’t trace the direct influence, but these works are my favorite

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Artem Mokevsky: Few people don’t know Stephen, but I managed to miss every film adaptation of his novels. I should be ashamed, I will definitely catch up!

(I remembered that I watched the “it” dilogy – I liked it)

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Artem Mokevsky: The Internet series “The Librarian in quarantine” is a comedy with elements of science fiction Youtube channel with personal experiences.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Artem Mokevsky: Russians go ahead!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Artem Mokevsky: I say hello to my mother

 

He played in Vyacheslav Vlasov‘s In The Deathroom Dollar Baby film as Boris.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Andrey Kalfa: My name is Andrey Kalfa, I am 44 years old. I am an entrepreneur in Russia and this has already said a lot. But in addition to my main work, I write poems, songs and sing in my rock band “Plan B”.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Andrey Kalfa: Probably each of us dreamed of becoming an actor as a child.

Personally, I participated in all the productions in high school. Once, in a New Year’s Eve performance, I played several roles at once. One of them was the role of a Steam Train that was captured by cowboys! And I prayed with real tears in my eyes that they would not shoot, because I have small children at home-Steam Locomotives! Haha, it was fun!!!

But if we talk about the professional activity of an actor, then my Father did not allow me to go to university to study acting. Alas.

SKSM: How did you become involved in In the Deathroom Dollar Baby film?

Andrey Kalfa: Well, I’m an adventurer by nature. Therefore, when I saw a nice Russian guy on TV, Vyacheslav Vlasov, who was giving an interview about the beginning of filming the film, I immediately wrote to him and offered to help in organizing the process. So I started asking to be an actor. To which Vyacheslav gently replied that there would be a general casting! A couple of weeks passed and he sent me a text, the role of Boris. In the description of which, I quote: Boris, a man of 30 – 35 years old . He has a solid build, and is ready to resort to torture to get information. Aliluya!!! It’s me xD

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Andrey Kalfa: I’ll be honest. I haven’t read this story before. After reading the script, I was a little confused. He didn’t look like Stephen King. It feels like it is taken out of the context of some other story. But the task was set by the director and we tried to solve it.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Andrey Kalfa: Yes, of course, as I already said, there was a casting. The first one in my life by the way. It was very exciting. When I went to the casting, I wanted to turn around and go home. I thought, ” Well, who am I?, probably this is not my thing. But what the hell is not joking, I took a chance. M-yes.

At the audition, everything was like a fog, and even after it, the fog remained in my head. And one fine morning. Boom. Letter: you are cool, you are invited to the role. The feeling is incredible. But immediately it became scary again. After all, now you will have to work for real . And I really wanted to match my role and not let my colleagues down.

SKSM: You worked with Vyacheslav Vlasov on this film, how was that?

Andrey Kalfa: In a word, it’s Fantastic. A young director, young actors, a cameraman. In one breath, we worked for a couple of days until the morning. This is beyond words. Something new, unusual and very interesting. We were very tired, but our emotions were off the scale.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Andrey Kalfa: Well, of course, there were some curiosities. At some point, we were writing my dialogue, the first take, the second, the director doesn’t like something. And somewhere on the fifth or sixth take, my tongue begins to slur and some nonsense begins to come out of my mouth. The whole film crew begins to giggle, but with each take the situation worsens and the nonsense becomes absurd, respectively, we just start laughing and rolling on the floor! I had to call a break.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Andrey Kalfa: Probably on the same night, after the shooting, we created a chat in WhatsApp. We called this chat by the way “Children of corn” (hi Stephen!) And we still correspond. Recently, we congratulated each other on the birthday of Stephen King.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Andrey Kalfa: At the moment, everything is trivial, routine, job. But I hope everything can change for the better soon.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Andrey Kalfa: I am a kind person!

SKSM:Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Andrey Kalfa: Read books, watch movies, and be alive and real in life!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Andrey Kalfa: Thank you for the interview, it was very pleasant for me. Thank you for your work! Peace to all!

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