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He is the filmmaker of Mute Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Kyle Dunbar: My name is Kyle Dunbar and I am a film director, writer and producer based out of Toronto, Canada.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Kyle Dunbar: Movies had always been in my life from a very young age, Disney and horror in particular. But it wasn’t until I was twelve and saw Snatch by Guy Ritchie, that was when I really wanted to go hands-on and experiment with storytelling.

SKSM: When did you make Mute? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Kyle Dunbar: I had signed for the rights to Mute in August 2020. The budget was just over $3,000. We shot it in segments from late September 2020 to early February 2021 in various locations just a couple of hours north of Toronto. We really wanted the places you see in the film to have that “Maine-look” most of his movies have.

SKSM: How come you picked Mute to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Kyle Dunbar: I enjoy nearly all of Stephen King’s stories, so it was difficult for me to choose one to make, but I knew I wanted something dark. Mute has that classic hitchhiker tale to it, but with a little more backstory. You give an act of kindness to someone and that person may repay the favour in their own act, but it may not be of “kindness”. I also like the back and forth between storylines, one dealing with the present, the other flashing to the past. The style King chose for this reminded me a lot of one of his Nightshift stories, The Boogeyman, so I wanted to draw some similarities from the Psychiatrist in that story to the Priest in my version of Mute. More of a fan-boy doing than anything.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Kyle Dunbar: I had first heard of the Dollar Baby program when I was in high school. I never made a move on it, but I had always wanted to. I would check up on the Dollar Baby site now and again to see what stories were available since they change from time to time. I remember through college playing with the idea of adapting A Very Tight Place after seeing it was available. I also remember being bummed when it was no longer available, I waited too long. But it remained in the back of my mind to do one. In 2019 I had heard that a friend of mine, Andrew Bee would be acting in the Dollar Baby project, Big Wheels (2020) by Andrew Simpson, and that gave me a huge dose of inspiration to see how they worked with King’s material. So the idea of doing a Dollar Baby was looming more than ever. In summertime of 2020 I had time to catch up on some Stephen King short stories. I didn’t visit many people or have many visitors over the lockdowns, but one of the few visits I did have, a friend of mine randomly brought up the Dollar Baby site. I took this as another message and the time seemed right to make a project since I could reach out to some of the actors and crew I was interested in working with.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Kyle Dunbar: The whole process was special, from sending the dollar to now sending the DVD. I am very fortunate to work alongside Rebecca Callender, Andrew Bee and the cast and crew for giving their time to the project. Even the stressful moments making the film I have to take as part of the process that made the film what it is. I have too many funny moments to recount unfortunately, we’d be here all day!

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Kyle Dunbar: I hadn’t considered that many King fans aren’t going to be able to see it. I went into the program knowing that I would be limited on what would be done with the final product. Something like an internet or DVD release would be great. Even someday to have all the Dollar Baby films up for viewing on stephenkingshortmovies.com, maybe! But I am grateful that the film gave the cast and crew an experience, it can make a festival run, and in the end be sent to Stephen King’s collection.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Kyle Dunbar: Viewers seem to like the slow-burn pace. I have heard it is very unconventional and a throwback to the late 80’s early 90’s horror. To me this is a good review!

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Kyle Dunbar: Nothing in particular. I just want to have it seen by as many people as I can. But horror festivals are always a fun time.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Kyle Dunbar: A humungous fan. For books The Sun DogInsomniaThinner and The Library Policemen. For his shorts there are too many to name. MiseryChristineThe Dead Zone and Stand By Me have got to be his best movie adaptations (I’m leaving Shawshank out, because we all know with that one). And I have a very special place for the original Creepshow (1982).

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Kyle Dunbar: I didn’t have any personal contact with Stephen King, but the DVD is on the way, I hope he enjoys it.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Kyle Dunbar: Give me The Sun Dog! I couldn’t put it down and I think it is his scariest. After I finished it I thought why isn’t this story more well-known? We know of Cujo and Pennywise, but this villain has a lot of potential and I have many ideas where to take those characters. I have also always had an itch to remake Thinner. That also has another great plot and I feel I have an ending in mind that is different than both the book and the movie that was made in 1996.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Kyle Dunbar: An anthology movie is an ongoing brainchild. I am also working on a mixed martial arts inspired horror feature and 2 other screenplays that I would like to make.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Kyle Dunbar: I have an obsession with the tv sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Kyle Dunbar: Thank you everyone for taking the time to read the interview. And be sure to check out Mute (2021) wherever and however you can. I hope the fans find it satisfying.
And thank you Óscar for allowing me the time to talk about my version of Muteand for putting together this special community for Stephen King fans and filmmakers.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Kyle Dunbar: I am always open for collaborations on projects from concept to screen. If anyone has any ideas for features and shorts they would like to workshop, please send them to easysalmonpictures@gmail.com

 

 

She played in L.A. Dubos‘ All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film as Mauras.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Eszter Ambrózi: My name is Eszter, I’m a 26-year-old Hungarian actress from Vienna. I’m currently juggling a few things: studying acting in Vienna and managing a small team in a bank – so there’s some corporate work that fills out my weekdays but my passion lies in my creative work. I have a podcast and I direct, photograph and model whenever I get the chance.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Eszter Ambrózi: My mum started taking me to the theatre and the opera at a very young age. I remember the effect a piece had on me, the daze you leave the theatre in. After performing in a play at school for the first time and realising what it felt like to create this magic, I knew this was the only thing that would fulfil me.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All that you love will be carried away Dollar Baby film?

Eszter Ambrózi: Through my friend Dan Cardoso.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Eszter Ambrózi: I think discovering a persons fascination with something out of the ordinary is always interesting to the viewer. Do we have such strange fascinations we might not even be aware of? Are they also helping us through difficult parts of our lives? What about this gives us comfort? This, mixed in with the story of a man who has lost all hope to go on living and puts his life in the hands of a flashing light makes a tragic and captivating combination.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Eszter Ambrózi: I had to audition with voice files.

SKSM: You worked with L.A. Dubos on this film, how was that?

Eszter Ambrózi: Very smooth. My part was done remotely, seeing as I am Mauras voice over the phone.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Eszter Ambrózi: Unfortunately, I didn’t get to know anyone in person – of course I am still in touch with my friend Dan Cardoso.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Eszter Ambrózi: I’m working on some short films and photo shoots this summer but starting fall, I will focus on my studies again.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Eszter Ambrózi: Yes – horror has fascinated me from a very young age and I started reading Stephen King secretly. I am currently listening to “It” as an audiobook and it’s a completely new experience!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Eszter Ambrózi: I am the mother of 43 house plants on 25 square metres. My goal is to make my apartment resemble a jungle.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Eszter Ambrózi: I love the idea of the Dollar Baby films – I love the fact that young creators get the chance to work on their craft and make such a renowned and fantastic authors stories come to life. I love the audience who watches them and wants to see what the next generation of filmmakers and audiovisual storytellers bring to the table – thank you.

He played in Paul Inman‘s That Feeling Dollar Baby film as Will Shelton.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Ian N. Blanco: My name is Ian Blanco. I’m was born and raised in New Orleans to some of the greatest parents in the world. My Mom is from Mississippi and my Dad, Costa Rica. From an early age I was interested in performance and spent my school years in pursuit of both academic and artistic endeavors. I went to NOCCA arts high school and began training in Musical theater and continued such training at Wright State University in Dayton, OH. I’ve been lucky enough to have spent my entire adult life employed as an actor. I’ve performed in nearly every state and internationally in Europe, China, UAE, and Taiwan. I love being active either on stage or in recreational sports or with simple exercise. I love food, especially canjun and creole. However, Family is what I treasure most. My wife and I met in a production of Grease! and we’ve been performing together up until the Covid 19 shutdown. But in the dark, light can be found. We discovered we were pregnant and now have a beautiful 7 month old baby girl. Being a father has been one of the most fulfilling experiences in my life.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Ian N. Blanco: My family raised me on some of those golden age movies with Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire. I was always outgoing and performing on my own. Then I had to pick an after school program in kindergarten and went with dance since my brother was already in music. I was cast as a leading role in my first performance and was immediately hooked. My artistic pursuit evolved to musical theater as I wanted more opportunities to perform. So now I’m a Actor, Dancer, Singer!

SKSM: How did you become involved in That Feeling Dollar Baby film?

Ian N. Blanco: My wife and I had recently moved down to Myrtle Beach from New York due to the pandemic and pregnancy to be near her family. I joined Backstage in hopes of finding more film/tv or voice over work as they normally require less time and travel. I wanted to be with my wife and daughter as much as posible. So when I saw a local production, I jumped on the opportunity. Thankfully Paul liked my audition and hired me after the callbacks.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Ian N. Blanco: It has this great sense of disorentation. It throws you around as you keep revisiting moments in the story. It’s like a thriller mystery as your mind tries to piece the puzzle together.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Ian N. Blanco: I audtioned for the role. Paul and I hadn’t meet before this production.

SKSM: You worked with Paul Inman on this film, how was that?

Ian N. Blanco: It was great! It was my first time as a lead role in a film. I had fun getting to be front and center for a lot of the ideas around the visuals and scene work. Paul did a great job of listening to everyone. I felt like my opinión mattered even if my idea was turned down because we took time to discuss it.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Ian N. Blanco: We had this one day where we shot on a plane sitting at the airport here in Myrtle Beach. When we got close to the last couple of shots, we started hearing a helicopter. It was a helicopter tour that was stationed right next to the airport. The problem was that it was just a short loop into our audio range as the copter lands that happened every 5-8 mins. Which is a nightmare for audio since the background noise needs to stay consistent througout a scene. After several takes we finally figured out the time and would wait for the copter to land and rush to get the shot. ONe of those things that is so ridiculously frustrating, it becomes funny.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Ian N. Blanco: I’ve kept tabs with some of the crew through Instagram, but have mostly kept in contact with my costar Cait. We both are pushing into the fim genre and so we’ve sent each other tips and advice as we progress in our careers.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Ian N. Blanco: I’m having fun being a father while finding projects here and there. I got another lead role that filmed in my hometown of New Orleans and have done a few voice over projects. With the U.S. starting to reopen, live theater is coming back and I’m looking to get back on stage after more than year of absence from it.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Ian N. Blanco: I’m not much of a reader to be honest. However, I do love nearly every movie based on his stories and I have done some delving into his meta world that connects all his stories together.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Ian N. Blanco: I’m not sure it is much of a surprise, but I’m a proud Eagle Scout. I was involved with the scouts up until Hurricane Katrina. After we finally moved back to New Orleans two years later, I just didn’t have time to return to my troop.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Ian N. Blanco: Thank you for supporting projects like these. It allows artists like myself to work and provide wonderful stories for fans like you. I hope you enjoy this production as mush as I enjoyed making it.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Ian N. Blanco: Yeah! My wife was able to get a featured role in the film shortly after birthing our child! She looks amazing!

He is the fillmmaker of The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Cameron Grimm: Sure, I am Cameron Grimm. I am the CEO/President of 5 after 5 Studios (formerly 5 After 5 Productions when we filmed “The Man Who Loved Flowers”. I am also the president of our other companies SteelBridge Entertainment and Spook House Entertainment for our Horror/Sci Fi side of house.

I have been in the business for 6 years and “The Man Who Loved Flowers” was our first film back in 2017. I am currently expanding my film making by attending Full Sail University in Digital Cinematography. I do everything from Writing and Directing to Cinematographer. I do all in house post production from editing, color grading, sound design and special effects.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Cameron Grimm: This has always been the dream. Since I was little enough to watch live action film I knew it was a love for me. In 8th grade (we won’t talk about how long ago that was lol) I had a english teacher that really pushed my creative writing. He saw something in me. When “Scream” came out in 1996 it opened up my eyes. I wanted to create and write film like it.

The filmmaker side dream came little after. I use to watch all the behind the scenes on DVDs to asborb everything. Then when I finished my first script it 2000 it was all about how do I make it. 2001 I graduated high school and the world trade center happend in New York City. I enlisted in the US Navy and my film making dream was on hold until I got out in 2006.

SKSM: When did you make The man who loved flowers? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Cameron Grimm: So, “The Man Who Loved Flowers’ was filmed in 2017. It was filmed over two weekends in September. Plus an added weekend for B Roll. The production was amazing. We had a great cast and crew that all came to me when they heard I was making it. It didn’t cost a whole lot maybe 500 dollars between some props and food and drink. A lot of companies in Greenfield, IN donated or helped. We got flowers from the flower shop donated. The pizza place offered to feed our cast. The businesses let us film inside what we needed.

We had people sitting on the 3rd story window sills of downtown buildings. There were people that booked patio seats to eat dinner and watch us film. We felt like the biggest thing happening in a long time there.

Now it only took a few weekends to film but what felt like a lifetime to edit it. Why? Because we had to redo it 4 times. Something I learned in film with this. It was a great story but edited in the order of events in the story. It didn’t make sense on film. We redid it 3 times to figure out on the 4th we needed to reshape the timeline of events and edit it in a way to retell the story. I think that is what threw me off on other versions of this story filmed. It doesn’t work in its natural form no matter how good it was written. We changed that. We filmed in September 2017 and finished edit in May of 2018.

SKSM: How come you picked The man who loved flowers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Cameron Grimm: Honestly it wasn’t my first choice. My first choice was “Graduation Afternoon” I loved that story for the normal day that turned into catastophy in NYC. Yet, I didn’t have the special effect knowledge for the destruction of NYC.

2nd choice was “Uncle Otto’s Truck”. I loved that story and setting but we didn’t have access to a truck that I felt was perfect for the story.

“The Man Who Loved Flowers” was number three. I guess they said third time is a charm. I loved the simplicity of the setting but we had to modernize it because it was set in the 70s. I loved the Doctor Jeckyll Mr Hyde character. He is happy and in love and they he is terrifying in the end. A back in forth inside the character.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Cameron Grimm: I have a good friend who is a avid King fan. He has a full bookshelf of just King books all signed. So in different editions. He told me about the rights to his story. I emailed him my love for his work, the story and how we wanted to film it. That we were a company built on volunteers who film for the love and the dream. Week later we had our contract in hand.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Cameron Grimm: Yeah, So we had to find some sidewalk with appeal. Was for the little girl jump roping and for the journey of the young man. We were in front of these houses. I was affraid the owner would come out and yell at us for being near their property.

So the owner comes out and talks to my Executive Producer. He then stands and watches for a bit. I went up to my Executive Producer and was like “Is he mad?

“Nope, he knew what we were doing. He is so excited we chose his house to be in the movie.” Sigh relieved.

There was one other. In the story they play stick ball. They don’t do that here anymore. So we changed it to baseball and used city baseball fields at the park. When my cinematographer and sound arrived they were floored. They thought I would have like 5 kids playing baseball.

No we two full bleachers of extras for fans. We had 2 full teams on the field. We had extra kids warming up outside the diamond and in other diamonds. They couldnt believed we pulled that many people.

Funny thing is we pulled that off mostly in one day, getting that many there.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Cameron Grimm: It’s hard. I understand that things need protected. Yet, if it was good enough for King or his team. Then I don’t see why couldn’t be allowed in some function. No matter how hard it is. The experience, the lessons learned, and the jump start are all well worth it. It jumped started my career. I just left my day job to run my film companies full time now.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Cameron Grimm: We showed it at one festival a small one in Indianapolis to some good feedback.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Cameron Grimm: We only shown it at the one festival in Indianapolis years ago. Now that its 3 to 4 years old. It’s hard to get in anything now.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Cameron Grimm: I am of some of his work. My first book of his as a kid was Nightmares and Dreamscapes. My favorite ones of his. I love Rose Red, The Shining (both versions), Under the Dome.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Cameron Grimm: I hadn’t had any contact with him. That would be awesome though. I really wish I could get his feedback on ours. Just because we had to change the order up to tell the story the best we could. Since it was different, I would love to know if hated it or liked it.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Cameron Grimm: Children of the corn, defintely. There is many reasons. One it’s older and the special effects wasn’t out back then that could be today. Two, I think I have a style that could really tell that story well. Three, there is so much corn here in Indiana. And finally my wife said “No one can make that film good” Challange Accepted lol

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Cameron Grimm: Oh geez a lot. Especially since we own 3 companies in film now.

We are finishing up post production on our first full feature “I Only Want You” It is a christian film but its very dark and tragic.

We have one more weekend of filming our 30 minute short “The Doorman”. A horror suspense which features Lynn Lowry from the 1970s “The Crazies

Then we are in development of a Christmas Film we want on Hallmark. That we were asked if we would be interested in doing a Christmas film. I said Why not lol.

I am also in development of Alien takeover film, a few shorts. We also have been talking to an author that moved her from NYC about developing some books of his. We’re still in discussions on.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Cameron Grimm: I spoke earlier about how I went in the Navy. Well I am an 80% disabled veteran and diabetic. Film sometimes is hard for me to move. If I do to much I might tighten up for the next day of film. My love of film doesn’t stop me. I keep moving and fighting through no matter the pain and problems.

Couple weeks ago we did the 48 Hour Film Project. I messed the nerve up in my leg. It was asleep for 12 hours and yet I still hobbled and got what was needed for the film. We made a great film for all the issues.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Cameron Grimm: I love what I do. Passion can drive so many things. Things you never knew would be possible. I thought the King film would be the only thing I would do  when I filmed it. Now its all I do is film and spend time with my family. My wife and 4 kids. I find the balance between both.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Cameron Grimm: Well, film is hard to reach people. Why we appreciate formats like yours. With rebranding we lost our old pages and began new. We really would love the people do subscribe to our YouTube so we can show all the new content we are soon to put out. Indie Film always needs support from so many people and places.

We’re on most social media sites if you want to find us. Without all the lovers of film out there. We wouldnt be able to do what we do. We do it for all of you.

She played in Paul Inman‘s That Feeling Dollar Baby film as Isabel.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Bonnie Ryerson: My name is Bonnie Ryerson and I am an actor/director/ theater teacher and most importantly, a Mom. I have been involved in theater my whole life one way or another. I attended The Boston Conservatory and worked as a professional actor in NY and Boston and enjoyed traveling on two national tours where I met my husband. A few years after my son, Max was born we decided to open a youth theater in Carmel, NY The Pied Piper Youth Theater. We now live in Myrtle Beach, SC, and have opened a second youth theater, The Pied Piper Youth Theater South. I have found it deeply rewarding to work with so many young people over the past 20 years.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Bonnie Ryerson: When I was 5 years old, I played Mother Nature in a girl scout production directed by my mom. I remember thinking… I wanna do THIS for the rest of my life!

SKSM: How did you become involved in That Feeling Dollar Baby film?

Bonnie Ryerson: I submitted an audition through a casting call in Backstage and was called back for the role of Isabel. I was so excited when I booked it.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Bonnie Ryerson: There is something fascinating about the idea of living parts of one’s life over and over again and never being able to get it right. Every human being has wondered what they would change if they had the opportunity to live their life over again. Only in the movies and in books do we have the chance to live out that daydream.

SKSM: You worked with Paul Inman on this film, how was that?

Bonnie Ryerson: Paul was great to work with. He’s a friendly and well organized director. He created a fun and positive working environment with his cast and crew. His adaptation of Stephen King’s short story was terrific.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Bonnie Ryerson: After being cast in the role of Isabel I noticed they were looking to cast actors to play young and middle Caroline and other roles. I immediately thought of my acting students. I was thrilled that they cast 4 Pied Piper Kids, Izzy Pike, Mattie Washburn, Jack Fitzgibbons, Madiyn Kowalkowski. I has so much fun playing the Grandma next to Izzy as my Grandchild.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Bonnie Ryerson: I still teach Izzy, Jack, Mattie and Madelyn and I also connect with many of cast and crew via social media.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Bonnie Ryerson: I’m auditioning a lot for film and commercial work. I’m also back to work at my youth theater. We recently produced an original musical called “Darkest Before the Dawn”, based on the experience of the teenagers living through the Pandemic. The Music and book is written by my husband, John Ryerson in Collaboration with the Teen cast.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Bonnie Ryerson: I think Stephen King is an amazing writer! I have read many of his books. My favorite is “Misery” as I also loved the film adaptation staring Kathy Bates and James Caan. I hope to one day play Dolores Claiborne in the Stage adaptation.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Bonnie Ryerson: I jumped back into acting after almost a 20 year layoff when the Pandemic shut down our Youth Theater. I was lucky to sign with a wonderful agency and started auditioning. Since then I booked the lead in a feature film, 3 short films and 2 pilots and a ROMCOM pod in the past year. I’m having fun being an actor again!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Bonnie Ryerson: I hope you enjoy “That Feeling”!!

 

She played in Paul Inman‘s That Feeling Dollar Baby film as Rental Agent.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Gergana Sirakova: First, I would like to thank you for the opportunity.

My name is Gergana Sirakova. US has been my loving home for the past 18 years but I was born and raised in Bulgaria. I am a mother of a 13-year-old son who is a mini version of me, and our life is full of adventures.

I have been in healthcare for the past 17 years and I am currently an emergency room nurse. I do love and care for people very much. I am fascinated with the body and the way it works but my biggest passion has always been the human mind. I am also an artist and love music and dance. In my past I have played the piano and did ball room dancing. I am into sports as well. I played basketball and ran track. Nowadays I do a lot of outdoor activities like kayaking, paddle boarding, hiking and I travel a lot.

I am not done exploring and I hope to inspire people to live full lives, do the things that scare them and make them uncomfortable because it is the only way we grow.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Gergana Sirakova: I loved theater since very young age. I remember when my brother and I were little we did plays for our family. We even had homemade costumes and a stage. I liked reciting poetry and read many books. When I was in elementary school in our town theater, they had children’s play on Sundays at 10 am and I went to it every single week for a year.

I took part in all school musicals and went to our local music school.

SKSM: How did you become involved in That Feeling Dollar Baby film?

Gergana Sirakova: What happened was… It is one of those stories. A very good friend of mine tagged me into Paul’s Facebook post. He was looking for a stand-in for the lead actress and the description fit me. I sent him a message. He was very kind and responded right away and let me know that he will discuss it with the casting team. Honestly, I did not think much of it. Next thing I know there was a contract in my email. I thought to myself: “OMG, what did I just do?!”. It was scary and exciting.

Then he asked me if a knew someone that can play a car rental agent. I asked what he had in mind and coincidentally I had a picture of me in my pone that matched that description precisely.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Gergana Sirakova: I can tell you what attracted me to the story. I can relay to it. Since the movie is not out yet I am not certain that I can explain exactly how but what I can share is that there is a phrase that just hit me: “Do something, do anything!”. Hopefully when you watch it you will understand. Have you ever had that feeling that you know exactly what is happening with your life, you know you need to act…but you do not act and your world crashing, and you see it coming… and you do nothing at all to stop it and just watch it happen?

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Gergana Sirakova: It was written for me; they just did not know it at the time lol. I did have to audition. I sent them a short video with my bio as well as few pictures and I had an online interview with Paul.

SKSM: You worked with Paul Inman on this film, how was that?

Gergana Sirakova: Paul is a very kind and easy to talk to man. He always conducts himself in a very professional manor and tries to accommodate everyone’s needs. Very soft spoken and with good sense of humor. I appreciate the fact that he always answers questions, calls and message promptly.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Gergana Sirakova: We had a great time making the movie and we laughed a lot. I have to say I did have a lot of fun working on the scene with the car rental agent with Ian. He is such a kind and respectful man and the part he had to played was not him at all. It is hard to put it into words and at the same time I do not want to spoil it but think about it when you watch that part of the movie. He did do a great job.

We also ended up having to put one of the guys in a dress and wig but that is a picture you would have to see. We will talk to Paul to release some of those funny moments after the movie are out.

Oh ha-ha. One thing that was funny to me, but I never really brought it up to their attention. At one point the main character had to throw a shoe as part of a scene. To my surprise they have somehow gotten hold of my nursing shoe. All I could think about was that I do not even wear those shoes in my car, and they are holding it. lol

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Gergana Sirakova: Yes, I do talk to Paul on occasion. He had sent me some pictures and scenes. I am very very excited about seeing the movie. Everything I have seen so far is great.

I also built a great relationship with Cait Salvino. She is wonderful young woman who is a very mature, very driven, focused on her carrier, kind, polite and funny. A great actress. She does call me on occasion to catch up and I will visit her in Nashville. We do hope that all of us can get together and watch the premier of the movie when it comes out.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Gergana Sirakova: I am going to do couple of projects with some photographers in near future. I stay busy with my son because my time with him is very important to me, so I do not really have big plans for acting but I did not plan on being part of this movie either. It just happened. So… lets see what life has in store for me and what I involve myself in. Meanwhile I will play my role of a mother and a nurse.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Gergana Sirakova: I have been a fan of Stephen King since childhood. “Cujo” weas the first scary movie I ever saw, and I watched it on VCR it was that long ago. The movie is special to me because it brings memories from my childhood. Of course, I read “It” when I was little too. It was that scary book they told you not to read and along with “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” was one of my favorites.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Gergana Sirakova: That I was a part of a movie. I surprised myself on that one too. Life is an exciting thing. Never a dull moment. I encourage everyone to the things they never though they could. The feeling is incredible.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Gergana Sirakova: I think that everyone will be able to relay to the story in one way or another. It will keep your attention. The plot in very dynamic and thrilling. The actors did a great job. Since it was a teaching project there were lot of young people working on it such as the camera crew. I was pleasantly surprised how focused everyone was, how hard they worked and how good they are at what they do. Keep that in mind when you watch the movie. And p.s. the camera man… great young man and totally belongs in a Stephen King movie.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Gergana Sirakova: I am very grateful to Paul and the entire crew for this amazing opportunity and all their kindness. They were a true pleasure to work with. I also want to say that I have a new respect for actors and everyone in movie industry. It is long hours of work and is exhausting in many ways. I think that we should all walk in each other’s shoes on occasion. It will make us more respectful and appreciative.

He played in L.A. DubosAll That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film as Alfie Zimmer.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Dan Cardoso: Hello, so I’m Dan Cardoso I’m a half French half Portuguese actor, lately living between Paris and Lisbon. I’m also anchorman and translator for American and Spanish TV shows conventions in Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Dan Cardoso: It started as a teenager around 13/14, when at middle school teachers came to me asking me to take the lead role of the play they were working on (which was huge with orchestra, 80 chorus…). I didn’t want it at all, but I let myself be convinced and I loved it very much.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film?

Dan Cardoso: A friend of mine I work with during conventions, told me he gave my number to L.A. Dubos, cause they were looking for a male actor, age 30 – 40 who could play in English and he immediatly thought of me. Two days later, L.A.Dubos called me, we talked and two days later we met.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Dan Cardoso: About this story, I would say it’s about the struggle. What do I do with my life? Do I persue my dreams even if it means risking a lot, or should I stay in a meaningless stable simple life that doesn’t make me happy.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Dan Cardoso: Neither lol. It wasn’t written for me at all, but when we met, we bonded right away. L.A.Dubos told me that it would be a hard one to play because of the struggle and the depth the character is going. At that time, I was just coming out of a big crisis myself, struggeling (in some way) the same way the character does. I told them I knew what the character was going through, cause I had felt it. So they trusted me with the role.

SKSM: You worked with L.A. Dubos on this film, how was that?

Dan Cardoso: It was awesome! I was so surprised how such a young person could be so professional, knowing exactly what she wanted and how she wanted it. She knows how to direct but also how to listen to the actor’s propositions and accept them. We always understood each other, even when we were beyond exhaustion.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Dan Cardoso: Shooting outside in the snow, at night, by -5°C without any apropriate equipment. But none of us complained. We were freezing, our shoes were soaking wet, we couldn’t wear gloves, neither the crew or myself, but we kept laughing together, knowing we had to finish that night, cause the 1st lockdown would start the next day.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Dan Cardoso: Of course. With all of them. And I can’t wait to do new projects with them. That team is incredible (as human beings and also very talented).

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Dan Cardoso: Because of the pandemic, I had to reinvent myself, because nothing happened regarding events, theater and so on. I’m actually writing a book on a true story which should be released in February.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Dan Cardoso: I wouldn’t use the word “fan” (properly speaking), but I really do love is work, and how he managed to create incredible atmospheres.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Dan Cardoso: Hard question, you never know what can or cannot surprise people. So I would say, maybe that I speak 6 languages.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Dan Cardoso: First, thank you for interviewing me. And to the fans, thank you for taking the time to read and I hope if you have a chance to watch the movie that you’ll like it.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Dan Cardoso: I’d like to thank L.A. Dubos once again for trusting me with this role, all the crew for all the work and good times we had together, and obviously all the people who helped us through the crowdfunding that made it possible.

He played in Andrew Simpson‘s Big Wheels Dollar Baby film as Leo.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Connor Dutchak: My name is Connor Dutchak and I am an actor. I graduated from the Theatre and Drama Studies program at the University of Toronto back in 2016, took a short break from acting to pursue other things, and have been back to acting since 2018.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Connor Dutchak: I was doing a silly little play in the sixth grade. It was about a 10th planet and aliens and I was a kid who wrote a report about it for  his school paper. Seems kind of weird, but it was the most fun I’d ever had at school really so I kept acting. But my family had a massive collection of old Disney movies in those plastic clamshell cases, so I think I always really wanted to do this.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Big Wheels Dollar Baby film?

Connor Dutchak: Andrew Bee posted the casting call on one of the Toronto Facebook groups. I saw that it was a Stephen King story and that Andrew and I had worked with a few of the same people so I applied right away.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Connor Dutchak: I think it’s how claustrophobic the story is. Our director Andrew Simpson had us watch One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest as inspiration for the characters, but I also think there’s a bit of Reservoir Dogs in there because the space is very open yet restrictive at the same time. It’s as if the environment is slowly strangling you without you realizing it.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Connor Dutchak: I auditioned. I had a few days to prep for it so I got to really dig deep into the text beforehand, which mostly consisted of me muttering my lines to myself while I was doing the dishes or when I was at work.

SKSM: You worked with Andrew Simpson on this film, how was that?

Connor Dutchak: Probably the best experience I’ve had with a director. Andrew knows exactly what he wants, but he also allows you to play so you can make your own discoveries and it doesn’t feel rigid. It’s very rare that you have that level of confidence in one another, and I definitely felt that.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Connor Dutchak: There’s this episode of Spongebob Squarepants where Spongebob and Patrick Star become the crew for the Flying Dutchman, and there’s one point where Patrick is trying to navigate around a huge rock, and Spongebob keeps screaming “YOU’RE GOOD, YOU’RE GOOD…” even though Patrick is scraping up against the rock and destroying the ship.

Well, the first day of shooting consisted mostly of Mark Rival and I in the car which you see in the movie, and that involved a lot of backing the car back into place in between shots. I do a pretty good Spongebob impression, and every time Mark would back the car up, I would go “YOU’RE GOOD, YOU’RE GOOD…” and Mark would start howling with laughter every time.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Connor Dutchak: This past year has been eventful to say the least so not as much as I would have liked to, but I hope to rectify that once things start opening up more.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Connor Dutchak: I shot a WWI film called “The Ace and the Scout” in Sarnia back in September which was pretty awesome. The past while I’ve been working on a few scripts and some other art projects.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Connor Dutchak: I’m admittedly not as well-versed in his writing, but I’m probably going to dive into his stuff more once I finish re-reading the Millenium series by Stieg Larsson. That said, you can’t be into movies and not see stuff based on his work. The Green Mile and Shawshank are two of my favourites.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Connor Dutchak: I’m allergic to cockroaches. No, I’m not joking.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Connor Dutchak: Just that I hope they enjoy watching Big Wheels as much as we enjoyed making it. It was an awesome experience for all of us and I hope that comes across onscreen. Also, watch for “The Ace and The Scout.” There should be a trailer out soon.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Connor Dutchak: On the larger topic of moviewatching in general, I urge people to go back to theatres once Covid restrictions ease up more and more. Some of the box office numbers already suggest that this will be the case, but I feel it’s important that people do, and not just for big tentpole films. There’s something really magical about the theatre experience that can’t be replicated elsewhere, and I hope that the time away from the big screen has people wanting to go back.

She is the filmmaker of All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

L.A. Dubos: My name is Lou, I’m 23 years old and I’m from France. I’m a young filmmaker, screenwriter and photographer. All that you love will be carried away is my second film.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

L.A. Dubos: I honestly can’t remember. I just know I always loved cinema in a way or another, but the fact that I could make movies myself never left my mind. I just didn’t really knew I could try and live thanks to that. I made that decision not so long ago, I think it was like… 6 years ago? I was in University, first year in foreign languages, and I didn’t liked it at all. I just wanted to do cinema. So I told my mom, and she said: do it!

SKSM: When did you make All that you love will be carried away? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

L.A. Dubos: We finished the post-production at the end of may, and I received the authorisation to do it in may 2019. So it took 2 years to make. I guess I could have done it much much faster, but because of covid, the production was delayed and really complicated. It cost a little more tan 3,000 euros. I was able to do it thanks to people supporting me, because I did a crowdfunding. I asked for 2,700 euros, they gave me 3,000. I will be forever grateful!

SKSM: How come you picked All that you love will be carried away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

L.A. Dubos: Well, I kinda understood that Stephen King was selling the movie rights for some of his stories as an exercice for young filmmakers. So I decided to really go into it, and I took the most difficult story to adapt, for me. I love fantasy and SF, and this story of this man, alone with his own thoughts in a motel room, was a challenge. I also decided I would try to show what he’s thinking without a voice over, but also without him speaking his mind from beginning to end. I really made this complicated for me, but I learned a lot. And it was the purpose!

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

L.A. Dubos: My mom is an absolute fan of King since a young age. So I was also into it very early. She obviously knew this information and told me. That’s how I knew!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

L.A. Dubos: For the toilets scene, we shot in a private location so we could be alone and have time to shoot our scene. But the toilets were sooo clean! So we had to do all the graffitis and write on the wall ourselves. It was really fun, all the team were in those toilets together laughing and writting on the walls. We cleaned after of course!

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

L.A. Dubos: They will be able to see the film in the future! I will share it with a private link or something. But to be public on the internet, I have to ask permission. And I will! I hope they will accept it.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

L.A. Dubos: People loved the ratio of the film! I’m really happy about that, because that’s something I love about it too. Dan, the actor, is also wonderful. That’s a good review that I hear a lot. Also the atmosphere. I’m so glad about that. I had some bad reviews too, like if you don’t know or read the story before, some stuff are difficult to catch or understand, but apparently, it doesn’t affect their appreciation of the film. This movie is only my second movie, I’m happy people are being honest so that I can learn from my mistakes and be a better filmmaker.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

L.A. Dubos: I will screen the movie at every festival that are willing to accept and appreciate it!

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

L.A. Dubos: Yes I am! The first book I have read was Cujo. But I think the one I love the most is The Long Walk. I would love to adapt it! It’s such a great story. But I think it’s already planned to be adapted? I can’t wait. And my favorite adaptation is so basic. I honestly think it’s Shining (sorry!). Let’s be honest: it’s a great movie! I also loved Christine.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

L.A. Dubos: No, I didn’t have personal contact with him, only with his team. I have to send him a DVD of the movie, so I guess he will see it! But I don’t know if he will tell me his opinion. I hope so! It would be super interesting and instructive.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

L.A. Dubos: As I said I would really love to shoot The Long Walk. I don’t think I will be doing another one, but we never know! Life is full of surprises. I stay open to all opportunities.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

L.A. Dubos: I’m currently working on a horror/fantastic short-film base don greek mythology. I arranged and adapt a story about Dionysus. I hope it will be produced! I plan on screening it in festivals.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

L.A. Dubos: I don’t know. Maybe that I never studied cinema? I didn’t. I learned everything by myself, with my friends by doing movies on our own.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

L.A. Dubos: Thank you so much for your support! It means the world to me. I hope you will like this movie, we all worked hard on it. I know it’s not exactly like the book, but it was imposible. I did my best to tell this story in a cinematic way. Overall, I did it for you: so take it as you like. I hope you will have a good time watching it, and that you will enjoy my vision of Alfie Zimmer.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

L.A. Dubos: I would like to thank my team. 2 years on a short film, it’s a lot. But they never let me down, and always supported me and gave their best. Clément F, Clément P, Alexandre, Marcio, Edouard, Jia, Orsa, Romane, and of course, Dan, thank you so much! And my parents. They have been incredible and helped me so much. Thank you! And thank you to everyone who watched the movie. Also, thank you for the interview!

Just: thank you.

 

He played in Andrew Simpson‘s Big Wheels Dollar Baby film as Rocky.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mark Rival: Hey Oscar, a pleasure to meet you. My name is Mark Rival. I am an actor/producer/facilitator for indie films here in Toronto Canada. I’ve been acting for close to 20 years and am absolutely in love with the process. I have a passion for the film industry and truly enjoy making connections with people, I have recently started to produce indie projects under Rival Productions, in order to help promote their work both here in Canada and internationally.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Mark Rival: TBH I’ve always had a fascination for acting. Influences from Films and televisión help to nurture and inspire creativity, especially when you’re a kid. We’ve all played roles as  children in the playground. Now I still get to play roles as an adult and I am having a blast!

SKSM: How did you become involved in Big Wheels Dollar Baby film?

Mark Rival: I was asked to audition by a friend of mine, producer Yair Karlberger.  One of the most profesional producer/writers that I have the pleasure of knowing. We previously worked on a feature film together that is now in post production. So I then auditioned for the role of Rocky.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Mark Rival: Stephen King has the ability to mezmerize his audiences through his detailed and rich colourful characters and their environments. His intelligent “slow burn” writing style keeps his readers intrigued and on the edge of their seats.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Mark Rival: I had to audition for the role of Rocky.

SKSM: You worked with Andrew Simpson on this film, how was that?

Mark Rival: That was an absolute blessing! Andrew’s profesional demeanor and friendly approach to all the actors and crew is truly inspiring. The respect that he gets form them in return translates to the positive mood and flow on set. His crew is hands down is the tightest and most organized that I’ve seen. He is an actors director, challenging us yet supporting our ideas and thoughts on set. I’d love to work with him again, anyone would.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mark Rival: Well, I got to drive a 71 Cutlass for a few days, hat was fun! The car was perfect for what we were looking for. A good friend of mine Brian Todish of Sunset Speedway said that we could absolutely use it for the shooting of Big Wheels.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Mark Rival: I am still in contact with mostly everyone from the film. That’s how much fun it was, Producer/ Actor/writer Andrew Bee plays “Bob” in Big Wheels. He is one of the most profesional actors that I’ve had the pleasure of working with. His approach to all aspects of his character is something to see.  He’s wonderful to have on set in front and behind the camera. Producer/writer Yair Karlberger and I are now discussing other projects for shooting this summer. Hopefully we will all work together on future projects!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Mark Rival: I’m presently acting in a T.V series where I play a Russian Billionaire that invites wealthy guests to his mansión to play a sinsiter game. Keep an eye out for “Enigma”. I am also playing a “Liam Neeson’ type carácter and the lead role in an action thriller that is presently filming here in Toronto.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Mark Rival: I’m a huge fan of King and have read most of his work and especially his short stories!  Writer of “Big WheelsDevin Garabedian has done a masterful job at his adaptation of Stephen King’s short story by recreating the colourful characters and their surroundings.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Mark Rival: My Nick name is “Hollywood” given to me randomly 30 years ago by friends of mine that I played hockey with. I used to come to the hockey rink well dressed I guess for our hockey games and one of the guys just called me Hollywood.  LOL.  Ironically I’m now doing films and T.V

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mark Rival: Thank you for taking the time to interview me on Big Wheels! This short film by Andrew Simpson is truly a wonderful glimpse back to the 70’s creepy, edge of your seat, horror thrillers that we all love! Cheers!

 

 

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