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He is the man behind Stationary Bike Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Alexander Jones: I am a writer and director. I am a recent University graduate with a (MA) in Film from Swansea.

I have worked on several commissioned works for various companies. I have run a film festival from the ground up. I have worked for a Football Club. I have worked on a feature film as a script supervisor. I have worked with professional screenwriters on several writers’ room to develop projects from the ground up. I have gained valuable experience working on professional sets and wanted to push myself and my set to another level.

Recently I sat down and set myself a goal. That goal is by the time I am thirty to have made a feature film. I have ideas of what the film may be however I don’t know if those ideas will become the final product. If I am to make my feature film, I need to push myself further bit by bit. So my name is Alexander Haydn Jones. I am twenty-three years old and I am a filmmaker.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Alexander Jones: Growing up I suffered from several illnesses. I was always ill with something. Specifically, I had asthma and grommets which severely affected my hearing. Then in my later years I suffered from bullying. Some days at school were so bad, my mother would let me stay off. So when I was home from school, my father (who coincidentally also studied film) gave me a list of films that I should watch.

So from my bed, I watched every film you could think of from ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ to ‘Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid’ to ‘La Jette’ to ‘Dazed and Confused’ to ‘The Shining’ – which I can tell you I was a bit too young to be watching however it stirred something inside of me that nothing else came close to.

So once I realised my other dream of playing for Arsenal wasn’t going to come true, I decided that film was my second career option. I Immediately made several (dreadful and potentially career destroying) adaptations of my favourite films with my sister in hope of emulating my directing icons. It fulfilled what I always knew that was inside of me. That I love film.

In some ways I don’t think I ever had a moment of knowing I wanted to be a filmmaker, I just think it was also inside of me that this was something I wanted to do and could be good at. In this life I can not think of another thing I would want to do.

SKSM: When did you make Stationary bike? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Alexander Jones: Stationary Bike was made at the end of January in 2018 for around £1200 which was raised through crowdfunding on Indiegogo as well as being heavily funded by the key crew members themselves and it was a shot over a period of three days for which I can personally tell you not a lot of sleep actually took place. The preparation and planning for the film had been in my head for over six years by the time filming took place and a whole year and half in various stages of test footage, auditions, rehearsals, camera tests, production design, costume, location scouts and so much more.

SKSM: How come you picked Stationary bike to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Alexander Jones: This idea and desire to make this movie started when I was fifteen years old. When I was fourteen I was given an anthology of short stories by my favourite author Stephen King. In this anthology was a short story entitled ‘Stationary Bike’, I immediately fell in love with this story. I would read it in my classes when I really should have been reading something else. From then on I knew exactly how I could piece this story together on the big screen.

The dream of making a Stephen King production had started when I was given the ‘Stationary Bike’ short story by my grandmother. She passed away that year, she never saw what I achieved in school, university or anything I created in film and it was only when I finished filming that I realised that this story was about letting go. The longing to see a loved one again and the forgiveness to move on. The process of putting yourself into the production and the consequences of emotional contagion boiled down to one moment. Saying goodbye to my grandmother.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Alexander Jones: The notion of Stephen King selling his stories for only a dollar was suggested by my University Professor and I initially laughed it off as an impossible notion. Then after sitting back and thinking about what I wanted to say as a filmmaker I looked into the idea. The idea that at age twenty-two I would have made a Stephen King adaptation of a story meant a lot to me and was too tempting not to investigate. I had to see if this was possible and luckily for me it was and now the rest is history.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Alexander Jones: The whole experience on set was an experience like no other and firmly became one of the best times of my life. Working with Lily and Kwesi in particular was a distinct highlight. Working with them on their characters’ backstories and relationship resulted in building a blanket fort (check out the film) which the whole crew then helped build. It was later used as the HQ of the production team. Even on a Stephen King film you can be six and play in a fort!

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Alexander Jones: It is truly the only downside to the whole deal. As above all else we make film for an audience and to see their reactions and specifically to see what Stephen King’s devoted fans think of the adaptations. As a filmmaker we can only do so much without an audience’s opinions and reviews. I hope in future that this becomes possible for a wider audience to see future filmmakers’ works. An internet release for future projects could be released collectively together so perhaps mass consumption is one way forward or possibly events where people can watch special one off screening. I know I would love to see what other filmmakers have created. A boy can dream.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Alexander Jones: We have been incredibly luckily as almost everyone who has seen the finished product has been unanimous in praise for the project. From the technical side to the acting to the score to the direction. People have seemed to have really found a connection with the film. When you make something you never know if it is just you that thinks it’s good as you love it so much however luckily in our case people loved it! My mum cried so think that is a pretty good sign, they were happy tears I promise!

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Alexander Jones: At this point in time, the film has been sent out to various festivals so you’ll have to keep an eye out in the future for further announcements as I want the film to reach as many people as possible. The first film festival I entered the film in was awarded ‘Best Student Film’ at the Copper Coast International Film Festival. It was an incredible honour and one hell of a night celebrating with the crew!

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Alexander Jones: I am a life long Stephen King fan for which you have my Mother to thank for that. Growing up I read every book and every short story I could get my hands on. Then in time watching every single film and television adaptation I could find. It is hard to say what my favourite works of his are as that is a very Sophie’s choice type of question. If I was forced to say however my favourite novel of his is The Dead Zone and if I was to cheat and say my top three cinematic adaptations it would be ‘Stand by Me’, ‘The Shawshank Redemption’ and of course ‘The Shining’.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Alexander Jones: As time of writing I am waiting to hear back from him however he has received the film so only time will tell what he truly thinks however that is a very exciting thought to have that he could be watching it at this very moment!

At twenty-one I successfully made a pitch to the one-dollar program to adapt Stephen King’s ‘Stationary Bike’ as my production. The usual method of pitching and receiving word as to whether it was successful could take between two or three weeks if you ever hear back. I had no idea how this worked however my pitch was accepted within 36 hours. My pitch was that I wanted to create not only a stand alone short film of ten to fifteen minutes but I also wanted to use this short film as a stepping stone to create an opening to what could be seen as a beginning to a series of short films of Stephen King’s stories in an anthology series in the same vein as ‘Black Mirror’ and ‘American Horror Story’ and which could be used in online streaming services. This is just the beginning of what Stationary Bike is. It’s a stepping stone to make this project, bigger and better.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Alexander Jones: At this moment in time I am not planning on any further adaptations as I want to experiment and test my abilities in different fields and genres of films but I have ideas….. In the future I would jump at the opportunity – I have already developed one idea for a series set at the Overlook hotel which focuses on the backstories and hauntings of the famous establishment in an anthology series with the Richard “Dick” Hallorann character being the lead as he is a truly wonderful and inventive character to explore. We have only seen a small glimpse of the hotel and I’m sure there is much to explore.

If I had to choose a short story of his to adapt it would be ‘All that you loved will be carried away’.  I remember reading this story and thinking of the story’s final haunting moments, visualising how it would look and be put together. Truthfully those final few lines stayed with me long after I finished reading.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Alexander Jones: Currently I have just released my second short film ‘The Night We Met’ which people can more than happily go check out on my YouTube page. The film is a coming of age drama about the choice of an old man at a train station who reminisces about a night long past of his youth and the regret of never speaking to a girl at the annual school dance who may well have been the love of his life. There at the station he meets a woman who has run away from her wedding. They meet and discuss in real time the consequences of regret and the memory.

Then next year, I am working with one of my close friends Chloe Cortes Dellipiani to write and produce a play to be put on in London. It is in its early stages but it is shaping up to be a really interesting and exciting piece in which I can push myself as a writer further and go back to one of my first loves, the Theatre. The play revolves around the key moments that define a relationship in the 21st century so watch this space.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Alexander Jones: To the people who know me personally this probably isn’t surprising, however, I have always fancied myself as a landscape architect like Mark Ruffalo’s character in ‘Just Like Heaven’ and on which I stand by my judgement that it’s a great film! I have no shame in admitting that.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Alexander Jones: Stationary Bike wasn’t just a film to culminate three years’ worth of education, it was a chance for a group of creative minds to collaborate on a rare opportunity – to said they’d tackled King. From those experienced with his works, to those fresh-faced, the dive into a mind-set long lost was a chance to truthfully examine what the concept of memories does to our human nature. We’d looked across the spectrum of film and television to pull from the visual treats of works like those of David Fincher, to engrossing ourselves in the art of lunacy. From Super8mm to digital, our expression of medium underpinned a message that I wanted to bring to the screen in our adaptation.

Stationary Bike was a huge risk, but without venture, nothing is gained, and thankfully the year of preparation and work towards this short film has paid off. I deeply believe is a story that needs to be told, a story that comes to a man trying to get over the loss of his wife, and especially with the importance of mental health and normalising men’s mental health. I believe a film like this can really change perceptions and allow for a conversation to take place. Having the chance to be interviewed on this website is an honour, but what’s more important to myself and the whole team that worked on the film tirelessly, is the fact the film is being watched and the story is continuing to live on.

From a personal perspective, I am proud of the film that we can share with everybody as it sees its festival run. For the combined efforts of talent both in front of, and behind, the lens honours the original premise of the text and equally push it to new heights. And where the issue of diversity runs so deep within our industry, this production has made every effort to be a shining beacon of the change we wish to embody – even at our level. So, from my heart and an immense tidal wave of pride. For your consideration, Stationary Bike.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Alexander Jones: I would just like to say thank you to all the people who worked on the Project. To all the people who supported it and to the man himself. Stephen King. Thank you for letting creatives tackle your work and make the dream of making one of your idol’s works a reality.

 

He played in Hendrik Harms’ Dollar Baby All That You Love Will Be Carried Away as Ian.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Christian Vaccaro: Hello my name is Christian Vaccaro and I’m an Actor based in the south of England.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Christian Vaccaro: When I was a kid my dream job was to become an archaeologist, but when I found out it was nothing like how Hollywood made it look in the Indiana Jones films, the next best thing had to be playing one in a stage show or film and getting paid for it. I didn’t really find the love of performing until doing The Tempest in a year 6 school production where I played the roll of Caliban, Prospero’s ugly fish slave (a roll I was clearly born to play). My Mum and Dad were so proud of me getting up on that stage and performing, I guess that memory really stuck with me till this day. As a child, I struggled at school due to being diagnosed with both Dyslexia and Dyspraxia, but I hear they’re both very common in actors.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film?

Christian Vaccaro: Originally I found the casting advertised on Harms Way Production’s Instagram page and loved the look of the project, especially with the Stephen King name attached to it. After speaking to Hendrix directly expressing my interest, I was asked to send in my showreel & a selftape of a monologue that both showed me off as an actor and captured the energy of the character. He then asked me to read in a few short scenes, offered me the part the rest is history.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Christian Vaccaro: I think with any King story it’s the idea of never truly knowing what’s going to happen next. The characters are all so fleshed out and I feel there’s always an element in at least one character that you can identify with, that’s what makes you care about them.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Christian Vaccaro: Unfortunately I had to audition for the project. Due to my age, originally I went for the part of the Clark as I felt I could capture that character’s energy of working in a dead end job that your hearts just not in, but Hendrix felt I was more suited to the roll of Ian, a nervous/passive aggressive school teacher. With every role I try to bring as much of myself into the part and at the time I’d been a teacher for around 2 years and felt that life experience really helped understand the mindset and mannerisms of this character.

SKSM: You worked with Hendrik Harms on this film, how was that?

Christian Vaccaro: It was honestly one of the best experiences of my acting career to date. Not only is Hendrix one of the most professional, creative and hard working directors I’ve ever known, but he’s also one of the most caring. He knows how to get the best out of his actors and crew to create a safe working environment that your encouraged to collaborate instead of just being told what to do.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Christian Vaccaro: If I had to pick one it would have to be the table read where we just sat, laughed and filled our bellies full of Beer and Pizza. Everyone seemed to get on and you could tell there was chemistry established from the get go. Any moment that all the cast were in a room together was fantastic.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Christian Vaccaro: We have a group chat but we spend most of the time sending funny photos and memes to each other. The cast had a meet up in London a few weeks ago but I sadly couldn’t attend due to other work related commitments.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Christian Vaccaro: I’m currently working with a theatre company based in Canada. We’re creating 4 diffrent shows to be perfomred in Turks and Caicos for 6 months. It’s always been a passion of mine to travel the world and for any actor to get a stedy gig doing what they love for a living is a real blessing.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Christian Vaccaro: I love Stephen King’s work especially his addaptations by Frank Darabont. The Shawshank Redemption, & The Green Mile are some of the best storys ever put to film, and when I found out that he went through the same Dollar Baby scheme gave me a lot of hope. I love how King always breaks the classic convention of horror tropes but actually take the time for you to fall in love with his characters so you actually care what happens to them, the basis for any good storyteller.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Christian Vaccaro: As a kid I struggled to hold a conversation for more than 10 seconds with new people, I couldn’t even look a person in the eye without feeling nervous. Nowdays it’s a real struggle for people to shut me up.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Christian Vaccaro: I hope you all enjoy our adaptation as much as we enjoyed filming it. Knowing how passionate King fans usually are, I’m sure they’ll let us know how much they love or hate it.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Christian Vaccaro: In the wise words of Tommy Wiseau, Director, Writer, Producer and Star of The Room (the best bad movie ever made),

“If a lot of people love each other, the world would be a better place to live!”

 

He is the man behind Popsy Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Julien Homsy: I don’t come from a cinema school. It’s just my passion for films and my artistic background (I’m an architect) that pushed me to be a film director.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Julien Homsy: I had met a couple of film directors. I have a company doing visual effects for architecture and wanted to go further with it so I proposed my help in visual effects. I also financed a short film project and was able to learn a lot from that. I loved the experience and decided to give it a try as a director with Popsy.

SKSM: When did you make Popsy? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Julien Homsy: 2016. 50K€. The take was a 5 day shoot but the pre-production and post-production took several months.

SKSM: How come you picked Popsy to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Julien Homsy: Popsy is a dark psychological thriller challenging subversive themes like child abduction and money games addiction. It has great characters, scenes and spectacular elements in the story.

I love all that and the choice was obvious to me.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Julien Homsy: A friend told me about it and then I went on his website and there you can find all the explanation and process on how to apply for the dollar baby program.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Julien Homsy: I find every moment special when you’re making a film. During pre-production, meeting the actors was very cool. I love shooting because it’s a live process where no mater how much you plan ahead, unexpected things will happen and challenge you. During post-production, editing is a great moment of creation as well as elaborating the music score.

About the music score, I was extremely fortunate to have Metallica accepting to put « For whom the bell tolls » in it.

Their lawyer told me that the band saw the movie and agreed that I could put it for free since it was under the dollar baby program 🙂

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Julien Homsy: Yes it’s a little bit sad that there isn’t a way to commercialise the best of the dollar baby films. But the movie was released in over 30 festivals and also at one that is a specific Dollar baby Stephen King festival in Holland. So they’re ways to see the best ones if you look for them.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Julien Homsy: I received mainly very good reviews. Sometimes a bad one on personal blogs.

What should matters to you as a director is that you’re happy with the result. Also, the success of your film is more important than the good critics.

They’re lots of films that have received bad critics that I find very good and vice versa. 2001 Space Odyssey had very bad critics at the beginning of it’s release. Critics are only human and their tastes are subjective. Find one you agree with and most times you won’t be disappointed when you see a film recommended by this critic.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Julien Homsy: It’s been released in about 30 festivals so far.

The problem is that film festivals don’t accept film when they’re over 2 years old. Which is Popsy age so now I don’t know when I it will screen again.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Julien Homsy: I am! I red most of his short stories but not all the novels. I’m more attracted by his dark psychological approach which feel very real in is stories than the fantasy aspects.

I know Stephen King doesn’t like Shining because it is betraying the original story in the sense that Jack Nicholson seems crazy from the start of the story. Stanley Kubrick is a god to me but I very much understand Stephen King’s point of view because this is where he is precisely a master to me. In drawing his characters from normality to insanity.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Julien Homsy: Only is secretary dealing with the Dollar baby program. I didn’t managed to have his say on the adaptation. This is the only regret I have on this project. But I’m quite confident he would like it because I feel as I understood the characters and managed to pass the story across in an authentic way.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Julien Homsy: No I don’t but if I could, I’d make:

Batman and Robin have an altercation (short)

Running Man, 1982 (feature)

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Julien Homsy: Sorry I can’t say right now but it is a very exiting adaptation for a feature project.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Julien Homsy: I’m 42 years old and just starting as a director. So it’s never to late to go for your dreams.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Julien Homsy: If you feel like giving it a try at shooting a movie or writing a story but wander where to start then stop asking yourself and start working!

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Julien Homsy: Thank you!

 

He is the man behind Flower Man Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Gerard Ender: I am originally from Panama. I moved to US when I was 10 years old. After living in different parts of country I landed in Washington, DC in my sophomore year in high school and lived here pretty much ever since.

I have been a professional actor for 30 years. However I got a degree in film from the University of Maryland.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Gerard Ender: I have always liked films. I was in my early twenties when I discovered acting. Studying film was as much part of being an actor as experience for working on films. I was interested in being versed on both sides of camera.

SKSM: When did you make Flower Man? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Gerard Ender: I made Flower Man about 6 years ago. I am delighted to say the production went quite smoothly. I was fortunate to find talented people eager to make it happen. I was actually surprised it went so smoothly.

My film was made with donations through fundraising and Indiegogo. I believe it cost me around $3000 with my one biggest cost being studio time for original music which I thought was money well spent. Everyone involved volunteered their time which I am grateful for.

Actual filming days were 4 days spread out over 2-4 weeks. Don’t exactly recall.

SKSM: How come you picked The man who loved flowers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Gerard Ender: I chose two stories as possibilities. The other was about a journalist in Latin America that is being interrogated and tortured. I felt we’ve seen many of those type of films. I didn’t want to do that one unless I could bring something fresh. So I’d that one and went with this one.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Gerard Ender: From a friend.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Gerard Ender: Nothing funny comes to mind. However it was an incredibly smooth production. We laughed a lot and all involved got along well. There were no dramas.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Gerard Ender: Well Mr. King is offering his work and allowing first time filmmakers to do it to promote themselves as filmmakers. They’re his stories. If you’d like to make films to sell or put on internet then don’t use Dollar Baby.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Gerard Ender: This is a quote from a friend that has a masters from NYU and works as a filmmaker.

“The film is a curious balance between darkness and levity, deliberation and madness.

Well done – are you doing more?”

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Gerard Ender: I submitted to festivals to no avail then ran out of money. I find it curious that most festivals charge application fees between $35 and $100 the better ones of course are higher end. Most will send you an email if you don’t get accepted. How are we assured they even saw our films? It’s like you’re blindly sending money. I think there should be forms to be filled pertaining to film that would be sent with refusal. That way we would know someone actually saw it.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Gerard Ender: I am a fan of Stephen King. I am not a fan of the horror genre per se. Having said that I like The Lawnmower Man, Shawshank Redemption, Carrie, The Green Mile, The Shining.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Gerard Ender: No.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Gerard Ender: I have no plans so far.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Gerard Ender: I am working on adapting another short story translation by an Italian writer from the sixties. I am in the process of contacting them for rights.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Gerard Ender: That I’m sane. I was on season 2 of The Wire on HBO Episode 15.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Gerard Ender: When all was said and done I wanted to make a 15 minute ride that people would enjoy. So to those who saw I hope you enjoyed it. For those who haven’t I hope you do.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Gerard Ender: Well I’d like to thank the fans that make organizations like yours exist so these films from filmmakers trying to get their names out can get their films seen. And to you and others like you for your commitment to make that happen.

 

She played in Hendrik Harms’ Dollar Baby All That You Love Will Be Carried Away as Emma.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Carys Jones: Hi! I’m Carys, I’m an actor, singer and voice over artist based in the Midlands UK. I played Emma in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Carys Jones: Well, I was three years old when I got my first role as the Christmas Fairy in ‘Titchy Titchy The Smallest Tree’, I managed to upstage Titchy himself by singing his eponymous song, and then my own, so I’d say it’s been a bit of an obsession ever since.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film?

Carys Jones: Hendrik (the director) is an old friend and I follow his work. I saw that he had auditions for his latest project and was really excited to send in a self-tape to try out for it. At first, I went for the part of Mary but was then asked to read for Emma which suited me much more.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Carys Jones: As with most Stephen King stories it’s unusual and thrilling. I like stories with a psychological twist and I think this definitely ticks that box. Hendrik was able to adapt the original story to the version we have worked on and it’s really exciting to see how audiences will react to it.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Carys Jones: I had to audition – I was really nervous as I didn’t want Hendrik to feel obliged to give me a part just because we’re friends. Luckily, Emma was perfect for me – she has a thing for plants and so do I. It is a life goal of mine to have a part written specifically for me!

SKSM: You worked with Hendrik Harms on this film, how was that?

Carys Jones: Ugh, he’s the worst. I jest, he’s one brilliant power house of a human being and I feel very lucky to be involved in his projects. He allowed us as actors to have creative freedom over our parts and was equally as relaxed when directing on set. The entire project ran so smoothly and I have to give a special mention to Chloe Brown the producer who ensured everything went to plan.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Carys Jones: So many! As a cast we all got on tremendously and spent a lot of time together when we were not filming. When all 7 of us were filming in the hotel room, along with the crew and equipment the room got up to about 1000 degrees; we all were melting but kept in high spirits. One of my favourite memories is dancing to Whigfield’s “Saturday Night” at nearly 2am in the middle of the woods with Zoe who played Rosie. Also, all of the food we had was fantastic, Amanda and Teresa provided us with tasty meals every day! A local bakery supported us by providing sandwiches and cakes which was very well received.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Carys Jones: Yes! We all keep in contact fairly regularly, it’s so great to see everyone working on different projects and supporting each other which is so imperative in this industry. We all met up a few weeks ago in London for drinks and food, they’re a great bunch. I’ve seen Leona most recently as we both filmed self-tapes together a couple of weeks ago.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Carys Jones: I have just finished recording a few more episodes of an ongoing animation project where I play a young Scottish girl, I’ve been doing bits of radio work and independent film. I’m in an opera which has been ongoing in research and development for a few years but now the wheels are in motion to stage it. Hendrik and I are also in the process of writing new shorts for film/theatre.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Carys Jones: I am, I remember watching Misery for the first time when I was an undergrad in University halls and screaming at the television screen whilst simultaneously trying to hide behind a pillow! I’m excited to see the new Doctor Sleep as The Shining was such an influential work. My favourite is Shawshank which is an absolute classic and I think I could watch that innumerable times!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Carys Jones: I can pretty much master any accent with a bit of time and work, apart from Geordie – that’s so hard! I love cartoons so I am really pleased I am involved in one at the moment!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Carys Jones: Thanks so much for asking me! Hope that you all like our adaptation!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Carys Jones: Always support your local artists, whether that’s by going to see their art exhibition, watching their short film or giving your support through social media. It’s so important and we are always so grateful!

 

He played in Hendrik Harms’ Dollar Baby All That You Love Will Be Carried Away as Alfie Zimmer.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jack Frank: Hello! I’m Jack Frank, I’m an actor and I am portraying ‘Alfie Zimmer’ in Harms Way Production‘s ‘All That You Love Will Be Carried Away’!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Jack Frank: My mum was in the industry both as an actress and as technical staff. She has so many interesting stories lf how she used to look after/babysit Zach Braff when she was at stage door manor, and travel alongside various theatre companies performing just utterly ridiculous plays. I also studied Drama for my GCSE’s, which was a theory based course; we’d go and see plays, study them and write essays on the performances and staging. Alongside that I was a part of the Wycombe Swan Youth Theatre, so from the last few years of secondary school, I was completely engorged in the theatrical atmosphere!

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film?

Jack Frank: I’m a HUGE Stephen King fan (just finishing off the Dark Tower series as we speak) and I happen to follow the hashtag #stephenking on Twitter and Instagram, which Hendrik had been using when posting the casting brief. I just had to jump at the opportunity, I was so obsessed with getting this part I think I messaged Hendrik everyday until he gave me the part!

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Jack Frank: The story follows Alfie, who as a traveling salesman, is constantly on the move, not really fitting in anywhere. With that in mind, he finds solace in various messages and graffiti on the walls of his motel toilets and bedrooms, which alter how he perceives the world. There’s a lot of interesting narrative decisions that have been made and altered to play with both the character’s and audience’s minds.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Jack Frank: I wish it was written for me! Originally I sent in a self tape, which was a video of me performing a short monologue in the style of the character. I was successful, and was asked by Hendrik to have an audition over Skype! Hilariously, my microphone didn’t work the first time calling, and the wonder that is WiFi decided to lag and buffer through the entire video chat. Thank goodness Hendrik looked past all of that!

SKSM: You worked with Hendrik Harms on this film, how was that?

Jack Frank: He’s brilliant. Truly brilliant. He’s taken every aspect of the original short story, and flipped it, making it into something both faithful and unique. Interestingly we had no rehearsals other than when the entire cast had met each other for the first time. In a way, it was all naturalistic what happened in front of the camera as we didn’t have much physical preparation for the roles, other than learning our lines and reading the short story! Hendrik’s crew were equally fantastic. Each member was dedicated to making a contribution, and I really hope the audience can see that in the final product!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jack Frank: For many of the establishing shots, we had to fill the walls in various messages and graffiti, so we all had our own little inside jokes jotted down. Hopefully you’ll notice some Stephen King Easter eggs, as well as some absolutely cracking dad jokes.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Jack Frank: Of course! It was incredible that everyone got on with each other! We all actually met up again a few weeks ago to get together, grab some food and drink in Camden! We’re all massively close now, and I for one really hope that we never lose contact. Everyone’s wonderful.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jack Frank: Right now, I’m working on my voice acting work. I recently got the chance to sing and contribute to the crowd voices in ‘Rocketman‘ which was insane. I’ve really appreciated the work I’ve had in my career so far. I also have my own podcast with George Douglas called ‘How to Struggle‘ where we discuss how as creatives in this industry, we can still find work, be productive, and most importantly be happy in this industry!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jack Frank: I’m such a huge fan of Stephen King, I really struggle to read anything that doesn’t have his name attached to it. In recent years he’s come back into the mainstream, and it’s fantastic to see great work adapted into film, television and all sorts of media! I’m really looking forward to IT Chapter 2, as well as Joe Hill’s NOS4A2 which I need to get round to watching!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jack Frank: I used to be Goofy and Tigger in Disneyland Paris! A short lived adventure, but a worthwhile experience!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jack Frank: Well thank you for reading this, that’s very kind of you! I really hope that when the film is released, you all enjoy it as much as I enjoyed being a part of it.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Jack Frank: Be happy!

 

He is the man behind All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Hendrik Harms: My name is Hendrik Harms, I’m a Writer, Director and Producer and run Harms Way Studios.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Hendrik Harms: I’ve always loved films from a young age. It fuelled my passion for writing and telling stories. For a number of years I was an actor and got a lot of experience working on sets. One day after reading a string of rubbish scripts, I decided I’d make my own films. There is nothing more rewarding to me than taking a film from the writing stage, all the way through to completion. Then being able to see people enjoy what you’ve created is just an indescribable feeling.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of All that you love will be carried away or some updates?

Hendrik Harms: The film is currently without editor, so has a little work still to be done on it. To keep up to date with our progress and to see any stills of the film, be sure to check out our Facebook and Instagram pages @harmswaystudios.

SKSM: How come you picked All that you love will be carried away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Hendrik Harms: I was a big fan of the tone of the story and I really liked how the main character studied and collected random pieces of graffiti that he found interesting. We come into contact with graffiti so often and never properly look at it, so the fact that the main character not only sees it all but he views these scribblings as his friends was just a fascinating story to build on. It really fired up my imagination.

SKSM: It is All that you love will be carried away your debut as a director?

Hendrik Harms: No, this is my second film. The first was a tense horror/thriller called The Music Box.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Hendrik Harms: I did know about the other versions. I actually watched quite a few as research for our adaptation. There were some really good ones out there and a lot of them were quite faithful to the original story with a few changes here and there. That’s part of the reason I decided to change up the story. I wanted to keep the same tone but after 40 years of the Dollar Baby scheme running, I thought people would enjoy a bit of a different take.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Hendrik Harms: I am a big fan yes. 11/22/63 is probably one of my favourite stories as I love anything to do with time travel. I am also really looking forward to the release of Doctor Sleep as the writer/director of that film, Mike Flanagan, is incredible at what he does. He adapted the popular Netflix series The Haunting of Hill House. So, with his visual style and distinct type of storytelling, combined with the mastery of Stephen King, I think that film is going to be very exciting for both King and film lovers.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Hendrik Harms: Being a big fan of Frank Darabont’s, I learnt about the Dollar Baby scheme whilst looking through his back catalogue of work. I think it’s a wonderful initiative and a great platform for emerging filmmakers.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Hendrik Harms: We’ve recently won two awards for The Music Box and I’m sure there are even more spectacular things to come for All That You Love Will Be Carried Away. These successes have allowed us to begin work on our first feature, which is incredibly exciting.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Hendrik Harms: Probably that I didn’t go to film school. My experience comes from watching films and working on film sets in front of the camera.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Hendrik Harms: Just that I hope they continue to follow our journey and to thank them for all their support so far!

 

He wrote the script of Charles Alexander‘ Vinton’s Lot Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I’m originally from Shannon, Co. Clare, Ireland but found myself homeless in London at the age of sixteen. I then got 100k Euro inheritance at seventeen, which I spent in ten months before turning eighteen. I provided palliative care for my Grandmothers’ bladder cancer for five years. During that time, I lost two of my best friends to suicide and started my own family. I worked my way though both undergraduate and postgraduate degree schemes whilst raising three young children.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a screenwriter?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: Honestly, at thirty-one years old, I still don’t know what I want to be when I grow up. I believe we’ve all just got to follow our passions and see where it takes us.

SKSM: How do you communicate with a director to design a screenwriter strategy for a film?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: With great difficultly. We’ve had a number of creative conflicts on this project. The key to overcoming these kind of obstacles is to communicate with an open heart and an open mind.

SKSM: Why did you changed the original title from A Very Tight Place into Vinton’s Lot?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: It was largely a marketing decision. A Very Tight Place (2019) was already taken. That forced us to think of alternate titles. We settled on Vinton’s Lot because the land that Vinton sells in the story instigates the conflict between the main characters. But it was also a way for us to give a playful nod to Salem’s Lot. Whilst also conveying that we are approaching the source material in a way that has never been done before. By altering the gender of one of the main characters we’re exploring the dynamics of power in a post #MeToo world.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of Vinton’s Lot or some updates?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: We are currently crowdfunding for a budget. At the moment we’re at £82 with 124 views. That’s an average of £0.64p per view. If we manage to maintain that average, we only need 4k views. I’m also going to be selling my comic collection like Kevin Smith did to fund Clerks (1994). I’m going to be recording and broadcasting live from location selling comics using Peggy Phelan and Philip Auslander’s liveness debate to engage with audience using digital and physical space in real time.

SKSM: How come you picked A very tight place to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: It was completely by chance. I was drawn to the title simply because my colleagues at AMP Media had produced a film titled A Thin Place (2017). I had read the synopsis for A Very Tight Place and had a general idea of wanting to transpose the setting from Miami, Florida to Strata Florida, Wales. But it wasn’t until after I had obtained the rights that I actually read the story.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I was aware that other productions have been made. Of course I did my homework and watched as many variations as I could. It was great seeing how other people visualised the narrative. I was impressed with the majority of what I saw, but was able to draw clear distinctions between A Very Tight Place and what has become Vinton’s Lot.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I was vaguely aware, as I’m a pop culture junkie, but I was prompted by a news article I had seen and fancied my chances. Bottom line is, you don’t ask you don’t get, what have you got to lose by asking a question. I hope the press coverage from Vinton’s Lot inspires other film makers to apply for their own dollar baby. That’s why we’ve included the link to the dollar baby application on our crowdfunding page.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: Sadly, under the terms and conditions of the contract, the film won’t be available for general release. But, whilst we are crowdfunding fans can get a private vimeo link to see the film for as little as £1, but it’s a time limited offer.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I’m a massive fan. My undergraduate dissertation was actually based on ‘The Body’. I always loved the dual narrative of the writer writing about his childhood. I’ve seen most of Stephen King’s films. Although, I’m less into horror then I used to be. But Was majorly impressed by Gerald’s Game (2017). It’s an impressive feat to sustain suspense in a narrative mainly focusing on one single location. I guess in many ways Gerald’s Game shares some natural parallels with A Very Tight Place.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I’m in the process of finishing my final assignment for my MA in Creative Writing. I also clean the university swimming pool and biology department every morning. I’d hate to jinx myself but I’ve just accepted a position in the cartography department at the Welsh Assembly Government, however I’m still in the process of finalizing details. I’m also working on a graphic novel series titled 84 A.E. with illustrator Colm Harnett.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: That I’m autistic. I wasn’t diagnosed until my mid-twenties. I spent a lot of my time growing up not fitting in. Stumbling from one catastrophe to another trying to make sense of the world around me. The diagnosis gave me a degree of self-awareness which enabled me to take control of my life.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I hope you’re all as hyped as I am for Doctor Sleep (2019)

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: Big thanks to SKSM for giving us the opportunity to show off our Dollar Baby.

 

He is the man behind Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Brian Johnson: Hello! My name is Brian Johnson and I’m the owner of 1130 Media Group. By profession I’m a Cinematographer – Director with over 30 years in the entertainment business.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Brian Johnson: I started out as an actor and was so fascinated by the technical aspects of production that shortly thereafter I went behind the camera and the rest is history.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of Uncle Otto’s Truck or some updates?

Brian Johnson: We started out two years ago but Hurricane Florence wiped us out, losing our home and all of our contents. But we are back and stronger than ever and about to take this production to a new level. We begin production in a few weeks.

SKSM: Who would be involved into this project?

Brian Johnson: Instead of bringing to the table my entertainment related colleagues, I chose to use local talent who had the passion to want to work on this King project. We do have an actor to whom has a recurring role on Netflix TV Series at the moment. We are truly blessed to have him onboard.

SKSM: How come you picked Uncle Otto’s Truck to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Brian Johnson: Growing up I was always frightened of old vehicles. Especially ones that were just sitting out in the field rusting away. Each had a story and then along comes Uncle Otto’s Truck. I knew it was my time to transfer my phobias to screen.

SKSM: I guess it’s very soon to asking this question but… where the premiere will be? Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Brian Johnson: I don’t have a particular venue as of yet.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Brian Johnson: I have not seen any of these adaptions. The great thing about true filmmakers is that no matter how many people are doing the same story, each individual will always have his vision and his take on the story.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Brian Johnson: I must say that “IT” is probably one of my favorites.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Brian Johnson: I found out about it through industry colleagues I had worked with.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Brian Johnson: I recently shot a docu-drama in Nashville and LA. The project is currently in post.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Brian Johnson: In my earlier days I had the chance to work as 1st AC for Gary Graver, Cinematographer for Orson Wells.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Brian Johnson: Know EVERYTHING from ground up and learn your craft inside out. To really be successful in this field you must be DEDICATED and work at it 24/7. It really comes down to how bad you want it and the willingness to keep going no matter how many setbacks you have to endure. Discipline is a MUST!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Brian Johnson: Please take the time to visit my web at www.1130media.com and reach out if you feel you could use my services or just want to talk filmmaking.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else to this interview?

Brian Johnson: If you want to follow the progress of Uncle Otto’s Truck with interviews and behind the scene photos, please visit www.1130media.com. We will be dedicating a page to this project in a few days. Also follow me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/1130media

 

He is the man behind Morning Deliveries Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Will Patrick Roberts: My name is Will Patrick Roberts and I am the producer of the film ‘Morning Deliveries’ based on the Stephen King short story from the 1985 book ‘Skeleton Crew’. I am based in North Wales, UK.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Will Patrick Roberts: I have worked as a runner, extra, writer, editor, photographer, security, set decorator and more on various film and TV productions like King Arthur (Warner. Bros), Spike Island, Outpost 2, Apocalypse and Separate Lies.

This is my first effort as a producer and will be my first short film. I have always been writing films, drawing storyboards, hundreds of sketches and ideas, always plotting or designing. I focused on writing for a long time, submitting to competitions and film companies to no avail. Actually one script ‘Deadbeats’ – a low-budget Beetlejuice knock-off set in a Victorian cemetery – was optioned but never produced.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of Morning Deliveries or some updates?

Will Patrick Roberts: In October 2018 I applied for the rights to make Morning Deliveries and, to my surprise, a week later I recieved a response ‘from the office of Stephen King’. On Halloween night 2018 I signed and returned the contract and started making plans.

My initial and maybe too obvious original impulse was to make a quite typical stalk and slash based on or inspired by the story. I was watching the two ‘ABC’s of Death’ horror compilation films over and over before I started writing a version. I must have watched 100 other short horror films too.

I don’t know why, but that version was abandoned. The film we are currently producing is very different and somewhere the decision was made to scrap the spin-off version and stick to the original text, word for word. As ominous and unfinished as it is.

The version we are working on still has Slasher elements but is more art-house inspired. I’m shooting it on VHS to give it a real grain, a dirty, greasy vibe like Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer or Driller Killer.

SKSM: Who would be involved into this project?

Will Patrick Roberts: One of the first things I did once getting the final go ahead was to contact Steve Swindon at Tape, a local film and arts centre, based in Old Colwyn, North Wales. I have been a huge fan of Tape and their projects and events since they opened in 2008. Steve is a cool guy, I remember one of the first things we spoke about was a shared love of the film Man Bites Dog.

I met with Steve Swindon and local film-maker and writer Andrew Turner at Tape and spit balled a few ideas with them when the project was in no shape or form. I then attended a screening of their film British Winters which blew me away. I found it really inspiring. A community effort and a great production. That was great preparation and put me in the zone for producing my first short film.

Local artist Lloyd Evans helped me go through the original story with a fine comb and drag out any images we thought could make for interesting visuals. These pre – production stages were a lot of fun even if 80% of the ideas or five different short scripts were honed then deleted. I’m happy with how it has evolved.

The Film will star Landon Sweeney as Spike Milligan and we are still casting for other roles.

SKSM: How come you picked Morning Deliveries to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Will Patrick Roberts: The main character Spike Milligan. To have such a shady, demonic character mooching about in our streets, creeping up on our doorsteps as we sleep is a disturbing thought. And the poison milk. As someone who once found a slug in their sandwich, halfway through eating, I think the thought of  someone or something contaminating your food is a terrifying and real fear.

The tarantula too.

SKSM: I guess it’s very soon to asking this question but… where the premiere will be? Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Will Patrick Roberts: I want the film to be screened between September and Halloween. I love that time of year when horror for horror fans gets that added buzz.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Will Patrick Roberts: I did see that someone launched a fundraising campaign to make a version of Morning Deliveries but I am not aware if that project was completed. If it has has I would definitely like to see it but maybe after we have finished our version. Just incase it’s so good it destroys the good faith I need at present to finish this one.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Will Patrick Roberts: I am a huge Stephen King fan. In my house growing up we had every Bruce Springsteen record and every Stephen King book. There were other musicians and authors but they were the main two.

When I was 12 I got The Talisman by Stephen King and Peter Straub for my birthday  and the protagonist in the book, Jack Sawyer, was 12 years old. I remember the journey into that story vividly, even now. I tried to read it again recently but stopped because I didn’t want to taint the memory of that journey. It would be a different book now. I can’t wait for someone to adapt that.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Will Patrick Roberts: I remember reading it once a long time ago and thinking ‘Oh. Lucky dogs’

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Will Patrick Roberts: I work as a manager 9-5 and do freelance media around that job. I haven’t been chasing film or TV crew work since acquiring the rights to this project. This has been my focus for the best part of a year.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Will Patrick Roberts: I have Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi as The Blues Brothers tattooed on my arm. A silly decision made after a few ciders when I was 16. I like the film but now they are with me for life.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Will Patrick Roberts: Watch every DVD commentary. The lower the budget the better. Even if you don’t like the film there’s no better source of inspiration than an informative and technical dvd commentary.

I hope if DVD becomes obsolete they store all the commentaries somewhere. Especially the Driller Killer commentary by Abel Ferrera. He is a wise king.

Shane Meadows, Guillermo Del Toro, the Evil Dead films. When I studied film they focused on things like the religious symbolism of Blade Runner or the significance of Tatoos in feminist cinema, which is great and cool but what I really wanted to know at that time was how the hell they bang a film together. How do you plan a production.

I’d also watch Bad Taste by Peter Jackson on repeat and then  with the volume off.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Will Patrick Roberts: I hope that we can deliver a strange and freaky short film worthy of your time and if you think it’s no good, I hope that inspires you to step up and get creative and make your own film.

Thanks, man.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else to this interview?

Will Patrick Roberts: We have just started a Kickstarter for the project which you can get involved with here. There is an opportunity to become an associate producer or even appear in the film… Thanks again.

Stephen King ‘Morning Deliveries’ by Will Roberts » Incredible Start! We are well on our way! — Kickstarter https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/will82rob/stephen-king-morning-deliveries/posts/2549809?ref=ksr_email_creator_project_update_copy

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