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He played in James B. Cox‘s Grey Matter as David.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Rob Patterson: Well, I’m Rob Patterson and I’m an actor, and artist.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Rob Patterson: I think I’ve always wanted to be one. I’ve been acting and performing ever since I can remember, even before I started doing it officially.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Grey matter Dollar Baby film?

Rob Patterson: Well, my agent called me for a last-minute audition down in Orange County. Another of her talent, Tyler, who I knew from our training with the late, great Gary Austin (founder of The Groundlings) had been cast for the role of Isaac, and she saw a great opportunity for us to work together. I wasn’t too excited about the long trip down there but I had to go down… Actors go where their agents send them. I got the call when I got home that I’d been cast.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Rob Patterson: Well, I think the parallel between the surreal make believe world of monsters and the real life of people and the trials and monstrosities we all grapple with at one point or another, often only internally, or privately. Stephen King really captures this effectively in much of his work, and I think James’ vision and choice to focus less on special effects and more on the human, emotional aspect, specifically the tattered father-son relationship really captures that in this version.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Rob Patterson: Yep, I auditioned. We all did. James would be the better one to ask about it, but I don’t think there was an option to tailor it to the actors, given the parameters of the Dollar Baby program.

SKSM: You worked with James B. Cox on this film, how was that?

Rob Patterson: James was a dream to work with. He’s super friendly, open, engaging, collegial, yet focused, with a strong vision. He really welcomed our input and collaboration, and made his vision clear to us without overwhelming us. I felt completely and totally comfortable with him at every turn. It was a really exhilarating experience working together with him and Tyler and the whole team he put together. There’s just a great sense of respect and openness and collaboration. It’s interesting from an actor’s perspective, the balance between expressing one’s on impulses and ideas as they arise naturally out of the process, but also staying supple and not getting so caught up in them that we forget our role is to be directed. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful thing to experience when the balance can be struck between the actor’s ability to express and regulate himself and the director’s ability to direct and facilitate.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moments when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Rob Patterson: Well, there was one day when the dolly broke, and we sat around for hours waiting for it to be repaired or replaced, but that really wasn’t funny at the time – more like “funny” after the fact.
For me, one of the really funny situations was trying to get the gelatinous monster flesh off my skin afterwards. I’m not joking, it took hours and hours of them scrubbing me down with oil and other preparations to get that sticky gunk off me. I think it might be one of the few times in history where a guy was frustrated by having two women rubbing on him all day. My skin was still sore weeks later, and occasionally a tiny piece of the gel would come off even over a month later – little remnant bits and flecks here and there. My girlfriend at the time found it both humorous and gross, bemused by how she would find a little piece of rubber remnant on my skin someplace and pull it off my shoulder or whatever…
We did have a lot of joking on set generally, too. Humor, fun, joking, and just engaging each other in a very friendly way, among all the seriousness of heavy subject matter. We all hit it off very well from the beginning.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/ cast from that time? If so with who?

Rob Patterson: Oh, yeah, James and I have stayed in touch, and his wife. Kevin (Slee) and I stayed in touch for quite a while, but sort of lost touch in the last couple of years. Same thing with Tyler. We did some more work together with Gary after the shoot for a couple of years. You know, though, people’s paths often just diverge… And hopefully converge again. Overall many of us are in touch on Facebook. I really look forward to working with any or all of them again at the soonest possible opportunity. I’ve been very pleased and honored that James has sent me a couple of his scripts on his subsequent projects for review. I hope he’ll keep that up. I’d love to work with him again. What a great time. It’s the joy of doing good work together and enjoying it so much that is just an incomparable experience. Once you have it, you have to have it again.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Rob Patterson: Well, I’ve temporary been on a semi- hiatus to attend to some family situations that need my involvement, but I have kept my hand in during that period. I’ve been trying to help promote the film I produced, cast, and acted in that was released in 2015, called Hamlets Ghost, to try to get its exposure up in the video on demand market, and more festivals, screenings, etc… It’s a really nice flick with performances by some great people, among them Barbara Niven, Stephanie Zimbalist, John Loprieno, and Ida Anderson. (If I may make a plug, ha ha!) It’s up on Amazon and other sites now. I’ve also have been involved in the development of a film being put together by a British Director and Writer team, called G.O.D.Tech. It’s a dystopic pre-apocalyptic tale based on The Biblical cal Book of Revelation that I think will be very interesting. I think people will enjoy it. I get to play another military character in that one. We did a sort of semi-prequel for the London sci-fi film festival based on that last April.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Rob Patterson: Oh yes. I’m not sure anybody from my generation could possibly not be. He was deeply entrenched in the culture that we grew up in, and the stories are just so intense. The joy of being scared type of thing. As well as other psychological ramifications. Sort of like very artistic poetry of a different kind…

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Rob Patterson: Well, I don’t now. One thing might be that I’m one of two Baltimore boys who did Stephen king films in Hollywood that made the top 10 list of all-time best adaptations. Holter Grahm did (the much larger production, of course) Maximum Overdrive, and of course I did the smaller scale production of Grey Matter. Another thing might be that I’m trying to head towards involving myself in a more official ministry, as in of the cloth. Pregnant pause, ha ha. Not to the exclusion of acting, of course, but sort of dovetailing.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Rob Patterson: Thanks so much for putting these interviews together. I just really appreciate the folks that have been so supportive of an interested in this wonderful flick. I’ve had so much fun at the screenings, and really hope that we’ll have more of them because I just really love the whole experience. The people who like this movie and the others in its genre are really dedicated lovers of the genre and the craft as well, and it’s just remarkable and wonderful.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Rob Patterson: Well, just that I hope we’ll all get some more life out of this film and let it get seen by more people, screened at more festivals etc. I know that the strictures of the dollar baby program limit what that can be, but even just more festival runs would be lovely. And I hope everyone will check out James’ recent film Control-Alt-Delete, and my recent film Hamlet’s Ghost and like my page to keep up with updates for the upcoming God tech. And James, if you’re reading this, let’s make another movie!

 

He played in Christopher Birk‘s Dollar Baby Willa as Henry Lander.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Gregory Michael Brown: My name is Gregory Michael Brown, but most people call me Greg.  I ‘m a filmmaker, writer, actor and photographer.  I grew up in Paterson, New Jersey, have lived in Virginia and New York but have always returned to my home state of New Jersey.  I have four children (three boys and a girl) from my two marriages and very proud of them all.  The youngest son who is a professional musician and teacher, my middle son who is 26 and a writer, my daughter at 44, a human resource manager and mother of 4, and my oldest son a father of 2, and an athletic communications director and associate professor of a well know university in New York.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Gregory Michael Brown: I had always wanted to be an actor since I was a small boy.  As a little boy and as a teenager I performed in various plays in church, grammar school and high school.  My dad was a stage actor on Broadway, but he wasn’t a part of my life after the age of 6 and my mom who brought me up didn’t approve of me pursuing an acting career.  She felt I should have other secure goals such as in business, maybe the military.  As it turns out I was in business for well over 40 years as an IT professional and in the military as a senior NCO, with the U.S. Navy on active duty and the reserves and in the U.S. Army and Army Guard as a reservist for total of 36 years.  When I retired from both is when I chose to go after my original dream of acting at the age of 59.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Willa Dollar Baby film?

Gregory Michael Brown: Chris Birk saw me listed on an actors’ website.  I can’t recall which one though.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Gregory Michael Brown: It was different from some of Stephen’s other stories and had a nice twist to it.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Gregory Michael Brown: I was asked to submit a video audition.  The character, Henry Lander, was in the original short story.

SKSM: You worked with Christopher Birk on this film, how was that?

Gregory Michael Brown: Chris was great to work with.  An easygoing personality and pleasant.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Gregory Michael Brown: On occasion I have chatted with Theodore Bouloukos, Jane Brown, Susan Kirby and was in contact with Chris Birk for a few years after we had filmed WILLA.  Jane (who is not related to me) and I had mutual friends from our childhood.  Susan and I shared credits in another film.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Gregory Michael Brown: I’m working on a couple of projects now.  A full feature film and two miniseries.  Some of which I am the actor, as screenwriter, producer and director and a film about Autism that a good friend of mine wrote.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Gregory Michael Brown: I’ve always been a big Stephen King fan.  My favorites are Stand By Me, The Shining and Christine.  Regarding the latter, my grandfather had a Plymouth Fury that had some peculiar characteristics.  LOL.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Gregory Michael Brown: I had just walked out of the WTC on 9/11 when the first aircraft hit WTC One while on my way to work.  I knew that day would change the world.  I’m a certified Emergency Medical Technician, SCUBA diver and an FAA certificated pilot.  I flew for the Coast Guard as a civilian pilot after 9/11 on Search & Rescue and security missions up and down the Hudson River corridor.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Gregory Michael Brown: Go after your dreams, only you can make them happen.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Gregory Michael Brown: It was a pleasure meeting you and doing this interview.

 

He played in Pablo ‘Macho’ Maysonet IV‘s The Things They Left Behind as Roland Abelson.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: My name is Michael J. Panichelli, Jr.  I am happily married to my amazing best friend, and beautiful wife,Lori. We have five children, and nine grandchildren. I am a retired Senior State Correctional Officer, as well as an Actor.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: As I accompanied my daughter to a model search, I was approached by the director. He said I had an interesting and unique look and would be good for films. He gave me the number of a casting director, and before I knew it, I was cast in my first film. That was ‘Unbreakable’. Sadly, I was cut out. But, I knew then, this is what I was supposed to do.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The things they left behind Dollar Baby film?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: I had the great opportunity to work with Pablo Maysonet earlier in my career. When it came to ‘The Things They Left Behind’, Pablo called me and asked if I wanted a part in his film. It was Pablo, so I said absolutely.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: The realness of the story. It hits home for a great deal of people. That survivor’s guilt that is felt becomes haunting. Those object are a reminder of how these people were here one minute, then just gone.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: Pablo told me that I was the only one he wanted in this role. He was familiar with my work. As I stated before, we worked together in the past.

SKSM: You worked with Pablo Maysonet on this film, how was that?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: Pablo is a very talented artist. He knows exactly what he wants from his actors, crew, and controls his complete surroundings in a professional, but comfortable manner. His sets are very friendly and pleasant.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: The subject matter was very serious. It had to do with the very horrific and very real time in our history that everyone was still very raw from.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: As it is with most films, you move on. You get busy and they get busy. I try to keep an eye out to see who’s up to what, when I can. I wish everyone the best. I as always, thank Pablo for the experience.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: The last film I did was ‘The Family’ with Robert DeNiro, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Tommy Lee Jones. I played Billy The Bug. It was a great opportunity to work with these amazing actors and the absolutely phenomenal Director, Luc Besson. I am currently working on the development of a web series, as well as a new film.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: Yes of course! I don’t know many people that aren’t. I think he is an Alfred Hitchcock intensified times ten. He’s an amazing talent.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: I am a big teddy bear. I might not look like it, but it’s true. My wife says I have a heart of gold, with a badass exterior, and a crazy sense of humor.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: I would like to thank them for taking the time to get to know me a little bit. I love what I do and hope to be fortunate enough to be able to continue my film career. I appreciate any and all support.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Michael J. Panichelli, Jr: Thank you for contacting me. It was a pleasure.

 

 

He played in Christopher Birk‘s Dollar Baby Willa as David Sanderson.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Clayton Watson: My name is Clayton Watson and I’m an actor most notably known as The Kid from Matrix 2/3. I write feature screenplays, direct and produce also and hail from the Australian outback on a sheep station (or ranch). Just finished directing my first feature in New york which I also wrote and produced.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Clayton Watson: When I was 12 I did a stage play at school and was hooked.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Willa Dollar Baby film?

Clayton Watson: Christopher contacted me in Australia and my love of Stephen King took over. I flew over and shot the film in two sections.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Clayton Watson: The density of the flawed characters is always a main hook with Steve’s work. The story itself is fabulous.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Clayton Watson: No Christopher offered me the role and I took it.

SKSM: You worked with Christopher Birk on this film, how was that?

Clayton Watson: Awful. Joking. Easy and very fluent.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Clayton Watson: The whole shoot was one big special moment!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Clayton Watson: The cinematographer Nathaniel Kramer and I became good mates over the shoot. We chat every now and then and hope to work together on another soooon!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Clayton Watson: Michael Wardeath is due for reléase this year and my screenplays are in circulation.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Clayton Watson: Love him!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Clayton Watson: I love table tennis.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Clayton Watson: Thanks for reading and hope to see you in another Stephen King film son.

 

 

He played in Chris Ethridge‘s Dollar Baby Survivor Type as Hanelli.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Adam Drescher: I’ve been acting since I was 15 yrs old.  Started here in Atlanta, Ga and moved to L.A. when I was 23, working there for 19 yrs and then ending up back in Atlanta 8 yrs ago.  Just in time for the big arrival of the entertainment industry here.  In addition to working as an actor myself, I also coach and tape other actors for their auditions.  I also have a leather business on the side just to make sure I keep busy.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Adam Drescher: I had dreamed of becoming an actor from the time I was 6 yrs old.  My family had moved from New York to Atlanta and I found great comfort in TV and movies and wanted to be part of that world.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Survivor type Dollar Baby film?

Adam Drescher: I had actually quit the business back in 2003 and ended up back in Atlanta in 2011.  A friend I have known all my life was in casting and convinced me to audition for this cool part in a Stephen King short film.  It was my first audition in 8 yrs.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Adam Drescher: I think it’s a pretty original premise, but it’s the twist in the ending that always catches people by surprise and who doesn’t love being surprised?

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Adam Drescher: It was an audition like any other.

SKSM: You worked with Chris Ethridge on this film, how was that?

Adam Drescher: As the quote goes, it was “the beginning of a beautiful friendship”.  Chris’s knowlege and enthusiasm of his subject matter, along with a great sense of humor, make him not only a great director, but also fun to be around.  Plus, he reminds me of TV talk show host Jimmy Kimmel.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Adam Drescher: After my audition I stopped in the restroom and I could hear Chris and his assistant talking to the casting person about how much they liked my audition.  I came out into the hall and he offered me the role right there!  A definite first for me.  Wish they could all be like that.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Adam Drescher: From the cast, I see Lawrence Sykmon every now and then, as he sometimes uses my audition taping service, but I have stayed in touch with several of the crew including Chris, Jason, Toniet, Jeremy, and Bryan.  I’ve celebrated birthdays with them, had many social occasions, and have worked on several other projects together with everyone.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Adam Drescher: I’m actually in the midst of a great run.  I can currently be seen in theaters in the movies “Den of Thieves” with Gerard Butler, “Forever My Girl”, and “The Leisure Seeker” with Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland.  I’ve also appeared in several TV shows and will be seen later in the year in “The Front Runner” with Hugh Jackman.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Adam Drescher: Of course!  In my younger days, “The Stand” and “The Dark Tower” made big impressions on me.  And as a movie buff, I love “The Shining”, “Christine”, “Silver Bullet”, and “Carrie”.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Adam Drescher: I lived in Thailand for 7 yrs just before landing the role in “Survivor Type” and sending our hero there to his doom.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Adam Drescher: I would love to say thank you to everyone for their support of this project and I really hope you got as much enjoyment out of watching it as I had making it.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Adam Drescher: Keep an eye out for future films from Chris Etheridge and Company!

She played in Marcello Trigo’s Dollar Baby Zornit as Android Jehovah’s Witness.

SKSM: Could you start by telling me a little about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Emília Marques: My name is Emília Marques, I’m an actress! I started my career in theater and recently I have been venturing into the world of cinema, making short films. I am a native of Recife, but currently I am living in São Paulo to improve myself in this area.

SKSM: How did you get involved in the movie Zornit?

Emília Marques: Well, I was invited by director Marcello Trigo to join the cast of the film. We met a few years ago when we had the opportunity to take a theater course together. And recently he had directed me on a cast of a movie for the cinema university. It was the test I had most liked to do so far. Well, he made me very comfortable and I show some of my work. But unfortunately I did not pass this test. At the end of that year I received Marcello Trigo’s invitation to make a very challenging character in his new movie, I was quite happy with the invitation.

SKSM: What do you think you have in history that draws so much people?

Emília Marques: I believe the interaction with unknown creatures and the mood of suspense. Everything that touches the imaginary can binds the viewer.

SKSM: Did you have to take a test or was it written directly to you?

Emília Marques: I did no test, nor do I believe it was written directly to me. But I believe Marcello Trigo visualized me doing well this character taking as reference other work I did.

SKSM: You worked with Marcello Trigo on this movie, how was that?

Emília Marques: It was very good, because Trigo had the picture of the scene very clear in his mind and he gave me a lot of confidence in leading me to get the result he hoped for. In addition to being open and listen to my contributions as an actress to his work, and ponder what was or was not possible, in a very respectful way.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to talk about?

Emília Marques: Well, my participation in the film is short and I have not spent so much time with the team. So for me the most special moment was to see Trigo’s satisfaction with my work. After the production he said now he “understand why there is an award for best supporting actress”. He was very impressed with my dedication and readiness to perform such a small role in the film. I did nothing more than my duty as an actress. But I will never forget those words that always serve as an incentive when I am going through difficult moments inherent in the profession.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the team / cast from that moment? If yes with whom?

Emília Marques: Yes, I always keep it with Trigo that always keeps us informed of the news about the film and its distribution on Festivals around the world. With the rest of the cast, we were friends before the movie was shot. And sporadically with others beloved ones of the technical team through social networks, like Jhonhson Willame (photographer assistant) , Felipe Mago (sound designer), and Rosario Gonçalves (art director).

SKSM: What are you working as an actress these days?

Emília Marques: I focused on the year 2017 in dedicating myself to studies. I have just finished the film acting and directing course at the Latin American Film Institute – Stanislavsky Institute. Where I learned techniques of acting and direction not even widespread in Brazil like Stanislavsky, Meisner, Adler and Chekhov techniques.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Emília Marques: I’ve always enjoyed suspense stories and get that cold on the spine and Stephen King is a genius at creating these stories.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to hear about you?

Emília Marques: Ahh, I do not know, this is a difficult question. Depending on how close they are to me they will be surprised by different things. I think what maybe people do not know is that I suffer from the pain of others and I wanted to have superpowers to turn the world into a fair place where everyone could live with dignity.

SKSM: Is there anything else you would like to tell the fans reading this interview?

Emília Marques: There are people in the world who will try to destroy your dreams and will make you believe that you are not capable. Invest time in self-knowledge, discover everything that makes you happy and always try to do it. There will be days when you need to do all of this at the same time to keep yourself up, so it’s good to know which things will work.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else?

Emília Marques: Stay with God.

 

She played in Alexander von Hofmann’s Dollar Baby Harvey’s Dream as Janet.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Caroline McKenzie: My name is Caroline McKenzie and I’ve been working as a professional actor for over 40 years.
I have performed on stage in Perth and Sydney for major theatre companies, including Black Swan State Theatre Company, Sydney Theatre Company, Griffith TC, Perth Theatre Company and many more. My last role was playing Nell in a production of Samuel Beckett’s Endgame.
In film and television, I have acted in short films, feature films and television series and telemovies. Most recently was in a feature film for children, called Paper Planes. I played a lead role in a television movie called The Great Mint Swindle and for three years I was in a children’s TV series that had international airing, called Ship To Shore.
I teach acting at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA), in the Musical Theatre and Dance Departments. WAAPA is the drama school where Hugh Jackman did his training.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Caroline McKenzie: I was interested from a young age. I was fortunate to have the opportunity to audition for a Youth program called Young World which was a part of The Australian Broadcasting Commission, when I was 16. They chose about twenty young people from around the state and we were involved in performing Musicals and plays. I had my first professional job in Acting from this opportunity, being cast in a National radio drama/series.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Harvey’s dream Dollar Baby film?

Caroline McKenzie: Alex had been given a recommendation. I don’t actually know who suggested me.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Caroline McKenzie: I think it is the underlying subtext of the piece. There is something unnerving about it and it keeps the audience in suspence. As a viewer, you are not quite certain what is happening. Is it a dream?
My role is mostly reaction, with few lines. Harvey has most of the lines when he is recalling his dream. It was fun having to try to convey my inner feelings and concern through stillness and subtext.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Caroline McKenzie: No I didn’t have to audition. Alex asked me if I would take on the role.

SKSM: You worked with Alexander von Hofmann on this film, how was that?

Caroline McKenzie: Alex was very calm, thorough and clear in what he wanted to achieve, and he was able to convey that to the actors and the crew. It was an easy process and I felt he gave us excellent direction, whilst allowing us our own creative input and journey. A very positive experience.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Caroline McKenzie: Not that I can recall but an unfortunate event occured for our make up artist. The poor girl had her entire make up and hair kit stolen from her car. This meant that on the second day of filming, there was no make up or hair curlers etc. So the lady who owned and lived in the house we were filming in, had to provide her hot rollers etc. We were sitting outside as the interior was being used for filming and the people who lived there needed their space, and it started to rain. We’re all trying to scurry under cover and I’ve got borrowed curlers in my hair and bits of make up borrowed from everyone and I’m thinking “Who says acting is a glamerous job?” We all just got on with it and it all turned out fine.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Caroline McKenzie: I see James Hagan (who plays Harvey) occasionally and I’ve come across a couple of the crew who’ve worked on other projects I’ve been involved in.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Caroline McKenzie: I’m about to start back teaching at WAAPA. They’ve been on their long summer break.
I’m currently on hold for a role in an upcoming TV series but that is not a definite.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Caroline McKenzie: Yes I like his writing. I’ve read a few of his excellent books and have seen a number of the film adaptations.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Caroline McKenzie: That I am a crazy football fan (Australian Rules, a game that is only played in Australia). None of my friends can believe that I can get as vocal and passionate about it as I do!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Caroline McKenzie: Thank you for inviting me to be interviewed. It is wonderful to connect with people from across the miles.

 

She played in Marcello Trigo’s Dollar Baby Zornit as Jane Porto.

SKSM: Could you start by telling a little about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Surete Martins: My name is Surete Martins, I’m graduated in Economy. I started to do theater as a hobby, however I was in love with the art of acting. I’m currently studying theater now.

SKSM: How did you get involved in the movie Zornit?

Surete Martins: I was invited to the movie. I did a play with Carlinhos Duarte, the actor who plays my husband, and when he was called to do Zornit, he pointed me to the director.

SKSM: What do you think you have in history that draws so much people?

Surete Martins: The curiosity and suspense.

SKSM: Did you have to take a test or was it written directly to you?

Surete Martins: I did not test, I was invited to participate.

SKSM: You worked with Marcello Trigo on this movie, how was that?

Surete Martins: Yes, it was great! Marcello is of such generosity, he makes us feel at ease, so that he can extract the best from each professional.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to talk about?

Surete Martins: A special moment was in the free hours for the rest of the actors. I talked with Rosario Gonçalves (art director) and we talked about her struggle to graduate with her son João Paulo in the same cinema course. I think it is a fantastic thing, in the same classroom, mother and son.  João has special needs, and his mother, Rosario, enrolled in the same course at the university so that her son could study. So she, who until then was just a housewife dedicated to her husband and son, became an art director of the independent cinema circuit.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the team / cast from that moment? If yes with whom?

Surete Martins: Yes, with Marcello Trigo, Emilia Marques and Carlinhos Duarte.

SKSM: What are you working as an actor these days?

Surete Martins: I am participating in a play that will be released in the year 2018.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Surete Martins: Yes.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to hear about you?

Surete Martins: There is nothing, because I am very transparent in my life.

SKSM: Is there anything else you would like to tell the fans reading this interview?

Surete Martins: Keep watching movies and going to the theater.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else?

Surete Martins: Let more people watch Zornit and fall in love by the movie more and more.

 

She is the woman behind All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Kasey Rae: I am a filmmaker and writer who’s favorite thing is storytelling and trying to shine a light on things that are usually left in the dark. I live with my favorite person (my wife) and live in my favorite place, New York City, a very difficult place to live but its my version of living in a kingdom and it feeds me creatively like nowhere else. As a feminist, I try to employ as many females as possible, which is something that is so important to me.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of All that you love will be carried away or some updates?

Kasey Rae: We are half way through the filming process, shooting on location as we are still finding locations! A pretty stressful part of the filmmaking process.

SKSM: How come you picked All that you love to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Kasey Rae: It isn’t exactly that I liked the story that made me take it on, rather that it resonated so strongly with me, as if I knew the story so strongly before even reading it. I also knew the impact it can potentially have on an audience.

SKSM: It is All that you love your debut as a director?

Kasey Rae: It’s not my debut as a director but its definitely my debut making a film on this big of a scale.

SKSM: You have a incredible cast and crew involved in this project. How did you convince them to play in All that you love?

Kasey Rae: I feel so lucky to have found the group that I did! Everyone is so talented and above all, passionate! Passion plays a key point in this film so it was very important to me that the cast and crew had that quality in them so that it would easily carry across onto the screen. Honestly, no one took a lot of convincing and everyone was really excited to bring this story to life, especially my executive producer Sancha Spiller, who is the only one beside myself who has been with this film since its conception.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Kasey Rae: My amazing friend, Jessie, was actually the person who told me about it after hearing it mentioned on a podcast. I went after it right away! I believe it was that evening I constructed my essay and wrote to him and his team.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there won’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Kasey Rae: As a director, I definitely want the story to reach as wide an audience as possible since this is a story that truly needs to be seen and taken in, I believe it can really help people when they see themselves in the main character and relate to what he is going through.

SKSM: I guess it’s very soon to ask this question but… where will the premiere be? Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Kasey Rae: It is indeed too soon! I don’t want to think on that side of things too much before the film is wrapped. I am very excited to hit the festival route though!

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Kasey Rae: Yes, I really love his works! Dolores Claiborne is my favorite King book so far, and while the book was best I loved the film adaption. Stephen King stories and Kathy Bates are a great combo, because Misery is one of the best film adaptions. The Shinning Will always hold a special place in my heart too.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories in the future? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Kasey Rae: I have no plans for that at the moment, I am open to that but I know All That You Love is the perfect one for me to direct.

SKSM: Are you working on another project besides this one?

Kasey Rae: While I am constantly writing, this is the only film I am directing at this time. My production company, Skylah Productions, has a few upcoming projects and I am in pre-production stages of Going To Mars with a Sad Girl which also deals with themes like depression and suicide, though it shows it in a different light and different prospective. So those are definitely a few things to look out for and keep track of!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Kasey Rae: I wouldn’t want to give it away.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Kasey Rae: When the going gets tough, keep going. Always be open to new experiences, constantly look for opportunities, and make sure you have a story to tell that needs to be told. Don’t stay down when you are inevitably knocked down (once or twice). Have a lot of passion and heart to fuel you because it’s definitely a hard road to take!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Kasey Rae: Thank you so much! I don’t know about ‘fans’ but I really hope my work makes its way to someone who needs it, and that they know they aren’t alone and can maybe see things in a way they never had before.

SKSM: Would you like to add something?

Kasey Rae: Support indie artists! Let their work have a chance to impact you, no matter what form it comes in. and to all my fellow females out there, do not be discouraged when you don’t see people like yourself in positions of power and of choice, rather work on creating that path so that others may follow if they chose to do so.

 

 

He played in Chris Ethridge‘s Dollar Baby Survivor Type as Antonio Pinzetti.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

David Calhoun: My name is David Calhoun and I am an actor and voice-over artist born and raised in the Atlanta area. I’ve been married right at 27 years and have a son who recently turned 25 years old.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

David Calhoun: I think that I really knew that I wanted to be an actor after I received a favorable response/reaction when I was in the spring musical in my senior year in high school. But I have to thank my girlfriend at the time for getting me to audition for the play (“Brigadoon”). She actually dared me to audition and I did and ended up getting one of the male leads. Once the acting bug bit, I was hooked. I didn’t get to return to the stage until years later after my military service.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Survivor type Dollar Baby film?

David Calhoun: I became involved in “Survivor Type” when my agent asked me if I wanted to audition for an independent film. She said that it wouldn’t pay much, but it might end up as good footage for acting “reel”.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

David Calhoun: I think what attracts people to this story is the same thing that attracts people to much of Stephen King’s work. He likes to use “normal Joe’s” in extraordinary situations and then runs with it. With King’s works, there’s typically some degree of “horror”, even if it is sometimes kind of humorous. I think that King likes for his reading audience to ask themselves, “What would I do in that kind of situation?”

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

David Calhoun: Yep. I auditioned for the role.

SKSM: You worked with Chris Ethridge on this film, how was that?

David Calhoun: Working with Chris was interesting because Chris had a vision of what he wanted to film and he wanted to stay as true as possible to Mr. King’s work. AND– he had to do it on a shoestring budget. He has a great sense of humor that really helped because I remember during that shoot it was oppressively hot in Georgia. Humor definitely helps.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

David Calhoun: Nah. Not really.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

David Calhoun: I still hear from William Harrison, who played Richard as a boy). Last I heard, he’s off at college and making a name for himself. I also hear from Kelly Natividade, who now lives out in California and got married a couple of years ago.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

David Calhoun: I just finished an episode of “Murder Calls” for the Investigation Discovery Channel that should air sometime in March or April. Hoping that 2018 takes off and is better than 2017.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

David Calhoun: There are some elements of Stephen King’s work that I DO like and some that I do not. I can’t say that I “follow” his work or that I’m really a fan. His constant use of flashbacks and the way that the story is told, is sometimes hard to follow. I think that is why his written work is hard to translate onto the big or small screen.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

David Calhoun: Something that most people would be surprised to know about me is that I was injured in a work-related accident that shattered my spine in two places and left doctors telling me that I would never walk again. And yet here I am years later and I am attempting to run a marathon in all 50 states and only have 16 states (plus Washington DC), remaining. Also, despite the fact that I tend to always play some rough-talking or hard-nosed character… I’m actually a Teddy bear.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

David Calhoun: Support your independent film-makers. Whether it be by helping finance a film or attending independent film screenings. These creative minds need to be seen and heard.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

David Calhoun: Thanks for the questions. Feel free to go to: www.imdb.me/davidcalhounVI and check out my work. And if there are any independent film-makers out there who have a movie that you think that I might be a good fit in, let me know. It’s all about the process and a process that I am honored to be a part of.

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