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He is the filmmaker of All That You Love Will be Carried Away Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Michael Lamberti: Hello, my name is Michael Lamberti, I am a full sail university student studying film production. I am also a recent graduate from Bloomsburg University with a bachelor of liberal arts. I am an actor, costume designer, filmmaker and videographer.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Michael Lamberti: Ever sense I was born! My mom introduced me to Star Wars, Jurrassic Park, Terminator and Alien. Ever sense then I always wanted to make films and make it my career.

SKSM: When did you make All That You Love Will be Carried Away? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Michael Lamberti: It was scary at first. Because I got the rights around August of 2019 and we were supposed to film in March of 2020. But right around we were supposed to film for this short, COVID – 19 happened and everyone was stuck at home. So if COVID never happened I would say it took five months to work on this. But sense COVID is still a thing it took us a year to get this film finished.

SKSM: How come you picked All that you love will be carried away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Michael Lamberti: I actually looked at the logline of the stories before I decided to work on this one. It fascinated me so much and I always wanted to make films not only a enjoyable experience but also an educational experience. For myself and other about certain subjects. Mental health and Mental Illness is such a very sensitive subject to talk about. I want to have the conversation about mental health so everyone doesn’t rely on stigmas anymore. The more educated we are the better.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Michael Lamberti: OKAY! SO! I was interning for Sky Media in London in the Summer of 2019. I did research for a video called 101 facts about Stephen King by 101 facts. Then I stumbled onto a fact I wasn’t expecting and it was the dollar baby film festival. I was blown away and didn’t think it was real. So I did a fact check and sure enough it was real.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Michael Lamberti: Jim Kelly who plays Alfie Zimmer. His hair is so long everyone thought I got Tommy Wiseau to do the movie. There were so many jokes on set and online. It was beautiful. We also making a behind the scene documentary on everyone’s experience on the film.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe an internet/dvd release would be possible?

Michael Lamberti: The film will be released in March 6th, 2021 6:30pm under by Lamberti Media on Youtube.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Michael Lamberti: So far I have gotten good feedback on this film. But we shall see when the film is released!

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Michael Lamberti: I do plan on submitting this to numerous film festivals that are aren’t nonprofit or a third party. I gotta do some research first! But yes do expect to see this film at more film festivals.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Michael Lamberti: YEP! My mom got me into Mr. King’s work. The first film I watched Christine, then it was Storm of the Century, later on was The Shining. My all time favourite is The Mist. Especially the ending of that film completely blew me away.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Michael Lamberti: I haven’t yet, only his assistant who has be incredible during the pandemic. I would love to talk to him about All That You Love Will Be Carried Away.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Michael Lamberti: I do want to make another one! This film was a lot of fun to work on and it inspired me to keep making films!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Michael Lamberti: I am currently working on two original screen plays that I want to produce! One of called The Night Shift a horror thriller and the second one is called Bloody Therapy a Horror Comedy.

I will be acting in a short film by NightlyBoi Cinema titled Reevena’s Revenge.

Including working on numerous short films with the film department at Full Sail University!

Also I want to start applying to acting agencies sense I have been doing acting for twelve years and have a reel ready to go. I might as well start applying!

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Michael Lamberti: I actually have a learning disability and aspergers. This film has challenged me so much because communication and social skills is a must in this industry. Doing this film made me so proud that I was able to grow and adapt to any situation that was thrown at me. Because throughout my college education I usually got you can’t do this you’re not good enough! Or you lack the education to pull this project off. But I am happy to say if you are willing to do the work you can prove a lot of people wrong!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Michael Lamberti: No Problem! If I have to say anything I would mention that this overall process was very risky. We filmed this during the pandemic. I was ready to stop production for the safety of others but I asked everyone if they still wanted to do this. Everyone said yeah let’s do it. So without the cast and crew this film wouldn’t exist today without their help. To my cast and crew thank you so much! You guys are amazing.

Also to the people that watched the film, I do want to mention you will fail a lot but you will learn a lot as you continue on this journey. No one is a perfectionist on their first try! Make movies, skits, volunteer to help your friends with projects, challenge yourself! You will be shocked where it can take you when you take first step.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Michael Lamberti: If you want to follow me and my artistic journey. Please consider following my Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube Channel for more content. I do have a podcast called the Mike’s One Mics Podcast. We talk about tv, movie, video games and theater! So, if that interests you please consider following us!

He played in Taylor Doose‘s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film as The Man.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Robert Milo Andrus: My name is Robert Andrus. Ever since I can remember, I have been drawn to television and film. I have been in the film industry for over 20 years now and can tell you that I love what I do. I am an actor, acting coach, associate casting director and producer.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Robert Milo Andrus: I did a community play with my family, “Annie Get Your Gun”. The thrill of entrances and exits, all the attention pre- and post- show. It was exciting and engaging and amazing. Once, I heard the applause, I was hooked.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby film?

Robert Milo Andrus: I heard about the audition through our acting community and auditioned for the role. I had worked with the producer prior to auditioning, so thought it would be fun.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Robert Milo Andrus: Stephen King is a legend, so that was attractive to me. Also, the title is intriguing. The story, I think the story has a way to connect the audience to the Man and his journey.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Robert Milo Andrus: I auditioned for the role with a monologue that I’ve had (in the back of my mind) for over 20 years. It is one of my first acing monologues. It is a fun one to dust off when given the opportunity.

SKSM: You worked with Taylor Doose on this film, how was that?

Robert Milo Andrus: It was a great experience to work with Taylor Doose. I lovingly refer to him as Doose. He is a great guy and we’ve since worked on several projects. I’ll work with him anytime!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Robert Milo Andrus: One of the scenes was filmed in and near the parking lot of my first Junior High School. I found that to be disturbing… and nostalgic.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Robert Milo Andrus: I do. I even officiated a wedding that brought several of the cast and crew back together.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Robert Milo Andrus: I have a alien-western project on the horizon and have a comedy-western due out soon. Lots of irons in the fire – so to speak. I am also

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Robert Milo Andrus: Yes! Carrie! The Stand! Misery! The Shining! The Green Mile! Firestarter! Yes!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Robert Milo Andrus: I’ve grown out my hair 3 times and donated it to charity 2 times.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Robert Milo Andrus: Thank you!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Robert Milo Andrus: Stay safe and be well!!!

He is the filmmaker of That Feeling Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Paul Inman: Well, before I do let me take this moment to say thank you for giving me, and the rest of us, this opportunity to have our voices heard and thank you for helping nurture and build a supportive community around these Dollar Baby films. I’d be remiss if I didn’t show my gratitude. So, thank you!

My name is Paul Inman. I’m married to my best friend, Kim, and we have one child who amazes me everyday. We also have a dog who is very spoiled – as she should be.

I’m a music teacher by trade. Music is my first love and it was through music I learned how to be a storyteller. I’m not sure that I would go as far as to call myself a filmmaker before I would call myself a storyteller. And I don’t know if I would be so bold to say I was a writer either – even though I do plenty of that (I have also written and published a full-length novel titled Ageless – shameless self-promotion to be sure). It all falls back to the magic of telling a good story.

I’ve done my share of creative things over the years, and I imagine that I’ll continue. My hope is that I move people in some way.

SKSM: How would you decide that shooting movies was your mission?

Paul Inman: When I was in college my friends and I bought a used video camera from a pawn shop. We also bought a VHS tape (yes, I’m old – or at least I feel that way sometimes) so we could document our “adventures.” With that VHS tape and video camera, we made our first film. It was a terrible parody of The Blair Witch Project. We had no plot or plan, there was no character development, or anything resembling an actual film, but it was the spark that lit the fire inside of me. There was a passion that couldn’t be matched with music alone. But I learned that no matter what I did, whether it was making a podcast, or writing a song, or making a goofy b-movie with my friends, I’d found what I needed to do with my life; create.

So, I have.

Music, movies, books, scripts, podcasts, and whatever interests me.

SKSM: In addition to filmmaker you wear a lot of hats in this Dollar Baby film. Could you tell more about it?

Paul Inman: We’ve chosen to adapt the short “That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is In French” – first collected in Everything’s Eventual – into a short film that we’re calling That Feeling. In the production of That Feeling I’ve taken on many roles as is customary in independent filmmaking. Some by choice and some by necessity. We live in a time in which more content is put out every day than one could watch in their entire lifetime. And almost everyone has to be able to do everything.

I knew when this first came to be that I was going to be the producer, writer, director, and editor. It’s wonderful to have so much control over what the final product can be. It’s also exhausting. Producing something of this size is a completely different beast than a 5-10 minute short film.

I was lucky enough to surround myself with some amazing people. I had a great 1st AD, Marshall Wells, who kept us moving forward. We also had some very talented – and dedicated – cast and crew that kept me motivated through this whole journey. I knew that the harder I pushed myself the better this film will be and the prouder those people can be of their excellent work.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of That Feeling or some updates?

Paul Inman: That Feeling wrapped principle photography in early January, 2021 and is currently in post-production. I’m working to lock the edit before I dive into the VFX, and sound, and pass it along to our amazing composer Gary Thomas. The movie isn’t a movie to me until it has a soundtrack and Gary is one of the best out there.

SKSM: Who would be involved in this project?

Paul Inman: We had two wonderful leads in Cait Salvino and Ian Blanco. The supporting actors were outstanding as well! I think there were a total of 13 speaking roles and another 4 or 5 non-speaking as well as round 40-50 extras. Everyone was amazing and gave their all in every take.

We were extremely fortunate to work with a great crew made of a terrific group of college-aged filmmakers along with some filmmaking friends of mine!

SKSM: Why did you pick “That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is In French” to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Paul Inman: The main character, Carol, is an interestingly flawed character. We learn so much about her life in those 12 or so pages; from the bond that she has with her family, to the cold, collapsing marriage, seemingly hanging on by a thread of what was once love, to the oppressive hold that religion can have over certain people – it really is a masterclass of turning a little into a lot.

Also, for whatever reason, I’m drawn to stories that are non-linear like this one. I could be in the minority when it comes to that, LOL. I feel like there are so many ways that this story could unfold and still keep the powerful meaning behind it. The idea that deja vu could be more is always an intriguing trope. It doesn’t hurt that there are subtle parallels to The Dark Tower series, either.

SKSM: King uses a lot of internalization and a lot of flashbacks in the story. In my opinión, it’s not easy to adapt this story. What are the biggest problems you had while filming?

Paul Inman: You are right. There are a lot of difficulties when adapting this story. For example, the majority of the original short story is presented as the inner thoughts of the main character. Inner thoughts can be difficult in a visual medium like filmmaking. Sure, we can do voiceovers to represent those inner thoughts, but, especially visually, this isn’t always the most effective way to create an engaging film.

My friend, Ben Higgins, helped shape the story that became the adaptation. He was a great sounding board for my ideas to adapt this story into a short film. Without giving too much away, I think that we found a way to balance the visually interesting while staying true to the spirit of the inner dialogue. I’m happy to share that the adaptation has kept a lot of the source material that was originally written by Stephen King. We expanded on some of the ideas as well, this is an adaptation after all.

As for the filming… I think that nailing down an airplane was one of the most difficult tasks. We had less than 7 days before rolling the camera and the plane wasn’t locked. That was a little bit nerve-wracking, to say the least.  In the end, where there’s a plane, there’s a plan.

SKSM: When the film is done, where would you like the premiere of your Dollar Baby film to be?

Paul Inman: Great question! In these strange Covid times normal premiers are basically out the window.

I’d love to premiere That Feeling in the first ever online Stephen King Dollar Baby Film Festival that’s being put together in April, 2021. It would be amazing to have a worldwide debut online where everyone can view it at least once. I’m not sure that I can get the post-production finished in time, however. But I’m willing to try!

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Paul Inman: I love Stephen King! Five feet to my left, is a book shelf that holds more than 50 first edition novels dating all the way back to the early 1980s. Of course, I have all of the earlier books too, only those aren’t first editions. They are a little too costly right now! LOL.

The Dark Tower series stands out as some of my favorite books. I also really enjoyed the Institute (one of his newer books). The Talisman (with Peter Straub) is an excellent book as well. You can really see how the “other worlds” developed for The Dark Tower series in that book. I like all the most popular ones too.

As for adaptations, I really like the excellent character work in Stand By Me based on “The Body,” Shawshank Redemption is amazing, The Green Mile is equally as amazing (might even be better) and I enjoyed The Mist a lot as well.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Paul Inman: Wow, at this point I can’t remember. I imagine I found it online several years ago. I feel like it was through the official website… maybe.

What I do remember is that when I found out about it I was instantly enamoured with the idea of being able to create a Stephen King film. I never pursued it until recently because I was always afraid I would fail. I still have a little bit of that healthy fear in the back of my mind. Even if this film is considered a failure in the eyes of the viewers, I know that I’ve succeeded beyond my wildest imagination just by making it this far.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Paul Inman: Funny question! I guess people would be surprised to know that I am a classically trained vocalist and I was in a rap group that recorded a few independent albums in the early 2000s. How’s that for juxtaposition???

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Paul Inman: My advice is to learn as much as you can about the art of filmmaking. We live in a time where everything you’ve ever wanted to know is at your fingertips. Take the time to study it and learn how to do the things that you love. There’s nothing wrong with picking up a camera and filming things, it’s a great way to open the door. To be the best you can be, you need to learn the right way and the wrong way to do it. That way each decision you make is calculated and educated when it comes to your films.

Learn about people and what makes us perfectly flawed humans, because the flashiest visuals won’t matter if no one cares about the people on the screen.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Paul Inman: This is an amazing community and I’m proud to be part of it. Thank you for giving me a little bit of your precious time. And thank you for inviting me to do this interview. Grateful doesn’t even begin to describe how I feel.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else to this interview?

Paul Inman: Again, thanks so much for this opportunity!

She played in Jordan Tandowsky‘s The Escape Plan Dollar Baby film as Haley.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Chelsea Kwoka: My name is Chelsea Kwoka. I am an actress living in Los Angeles with my husband, primarily working in Voice Over from my home studio. I got my degree in Theatre from Florida State University and am currently producing an all female (cast & crew) short film with some of my fellow Noles. When I’m not voicing characters or portraying them on screen, I am either traveling, camping, spending time with Friends and family or attempting to bake (usually unsuccessfully).

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Chelsea Kwoka: My cousin, Eric, used to teach me the Dana Carvey “Church Lady” sketches from SNL when I was a toddler and I would babble them at my family. Getting those early laughs definitely hooked me! Growing up I was in school plays and danced competitively and just loved performing creatively. I started thinking about acting as a legitimate career path when I toured FSU – they have an incredible School of Theatre and world reknowned Film School that enlightened me to the potential of a life on stage and in film.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The escape room Dollar Baby film?

Chelsea Kwoka: I had worked with Mary Rachel Gardner (producer) and Jordan Tandowsky (director/writer/producer) on several projects in the past. They consistently put out quality projects and are just fantastic people to get to work with and learn from on set.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Chelsea Kwoka: While (hopefully) not many people have been abducted and tortured, I think this film really speaks to people having to make difficult choices. How wrestling with yourself and struggling with your own demons affects the decisions we make and knowing that we will ultimately have to live with our choices.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Chelsea Kwoka: I play the lover, Haley, of the main character in a flashback scene. I luckily missed out on any torture! I was asked by Mary Rachel and Jordan to play Haley and was so grateful they thought of me.

SKSM: You worked with Jordan Tandowsky on this film, how was that?

Chelsea Kwoka: Jordan is always a pleasure to work with on set. He knows what he wants but is open and collaborative which is a hard balance to strike sometimes! I always felt like he was leading us but was still accesible if we had questions or opinions on things.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Chelsea Kwoka: For me, getting to work with both Mary Rachel and Jordan, who I have the utmost respect for, was the most special aspect. That, along with getting to work with new collaborators like Joe Raffa and Octavio Estrada was really wonderful. The whole team was professional and easy to work with.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Chelsea Kwoka: Well it’s tough to stay in contact with anyone during a pandemic! But I’ve stayed in touch with many of them via socials and champion their projects from 6 feet away!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Chelsea Kwoka: I’m currently in the middle of pre-production for a short film I am producing and starring in, “The Little Things”. It’s a dramedy about a woman struggling to not let the little things keep her from experiencing joy in her daily life. I’m not used to wearing this many hats but it has been an intensely rewarding experience. I have been very diligent in expanding my network to work with as many new collaborators as posible on this one, and have been very successful in assembling a team of talented women to be both behind and in front of the camera. It’s been humbling and rewarding to bring all of these new women into my life and I’m so excited for us to get into principal photography!

I am an audiobook narrator and am currently working on a non-fiction book about the Greek Goddess archetypes and how they manifest in modern women. I love recording audiobooks for two separate reasons : with non-fiction I get to become a world expert on a very niche subject (great for trivia) and with fiction I get to cast, direct and act out an entire film exactly as I want to. It’s so much fun to step in the booth and live these full lives for a brief time.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Chelsea Kwoka: I am an unsuspecting fan of Stephen King! I have a love/hate relationship with “scary” stories but his work is always just so captivating, I can’t help but feel sucked in. Whether movies/books like “It” or “Carrie”, I want to look away but find myself peeking through my fingers because I just have to see what happens. He has a way of drawing you in to the story in a truly terrifying way.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Chelsea Kwoka: I love to hang artwork made by friends, family or that I’ve created! I have watercolors in the hallway done by nieces and nephews, art from old Friends I’ve commissioned and always have one piece of art near the entryway of wherever I live that I ask guests to “sign” – it usually has a theme, my favorite was from my Hollywood apartment. Every guest literally signed on a single line and so now it looks like a heartbeat or sound wave, with all the signatures overlapped.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Chelsea Kwoka: Thank you for supporting independent filmmakers! The team worked so hard to bring this story to life, and to do well by Stephen King fans, and we are just so appreciative of the ability to keep telling stories and sharing them with audiences.

She played in Will Patrick Roberts‘ Dollar Baby Morning Deliveries as Mother.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Lara Crawford: I actually work full time in Accounts and Finance, and teach Fitness Yoga part time. I have been involved with local community theatre since 1987. I am a member of two local groups, and have played leading and supporting roles, as well as spending many years as a dancer and choreographer for musicals staged in my local area. I have also enjoyed many roles in straight plays and comedies too. I am a member of two Committees and volunteer as Treasurer. So this keeps me busy! In the past I have also been an extra on a few BBC and local Welsh productions and also more recently in The Crown.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Lara Crawford: Probably from the age of about 6 or 7. Apparently I always learnt everybody else’s lines in school as well as my own! I enjoyed dressing up from an early age and imitating people on TV! Initially though, my main love was dancing and I started this from an early age although it wouldn’t be until my family moved that I actually started dance classes at around 13 years of age.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Morning deliveries Dollar Baby film?

Lara Crawford: I actually know Landon Sweeney, who played the main role, as we are part of the same theatre groups and he asked if I would be interested as Will was looking for someone to play his “younger” mother!! I have also been involved in many plays with Lorna Hughes as well and know Geoff Edkins.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Lara Crawford: I’m inclined to say, mainly because it’s “Stephen King”, and with that automatically comes a good story, with incredible imagination.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Lara Crawford: As it was only a very minor role, Landon put my name forward after asking if I was interested so there was no audition as such. I know how difficult it is sometimes to find people in this area who will get involved in projects, and there is a group of people that know each other and know what they are capable of.

SKSM: You worked with Will Patrick Roberts on this film, how was that?

Lara Crawford: Will was very friendly and very professional. He seemed to know exactly how he wanted the film to be. I had only just met him and he was very reassuring and organised.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Lara Crawford: As I mentioned mine was only a very fleeting moment on screen, but it was quite funny to put on my 1970s clothes and wig and stand on the local beach with Will, being filmed on a cold, grey and windy morning. Anybody passing by must have been wondering what was going on!! It was fun though as I enjoy anything like that!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Lara Crawford: Currently we are not in contact in person because of the situation but normally I would see Landon and Lorna at rehearsals or social events for the groups I am involved in. They are both very talented and versatile in the roles I have seen them play. I worked with Geoff, who was a brilliant drummer and accompaniment during rehearsal for the musical Avenue Q, before lockdown.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Lara Crawford: Before lockdown, one group was a week away from performing Avenue Q and I had the part of Lucy.  This was unfortunately cancelled. I would also have been involved in the annual Summer Season which is a variety, musical show that runs from June to September – this was also cancelled. As well as that I would have been involved in some way in The Diary of Anne Frank – which we also had to cancel due to the lockdown, and a great shame. I am looking forward to starting back sometime this year, when we will be looking to perform the musical Elf in November. Fingers crossed!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Lara Crawford: Yes very much so. I still have a lot of his work to watch and read, but have enjoyed the books and films seen so far. I was particularly a fan in the 1990s and read books such as Misery, The Shining and Rose Madder. More recently I have read 11/22/63 and loved the TV series, as well as the book Revival. I also love the films Secret Window, Shawshank Redemption, Misery and Carrie and the original IT miniseries.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Lara Crawford: I think people in work are always a little suprised about the theatre work I do, as I am normally pretty shy and reserved!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Lara Crawford: Just that I hope they enjoy the film and what an opportunity it is for budding filmakers to have the opportunity to create Stephen King’s work, as well as put their own spin on it!  Also for people like myself who are able to use opportunities like this to build on their own skills and experience.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Lara Crawford: Thanks for the questions and interest!! 🙂

He played in Georges Terryn‘s Nona Dollar Baby film as Dr. Jourdan Reed.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Lucas Tavernier: I’m a multilingual (NL, FR, EN, IT, ES, DE, notions of TR and AR) actor, based in Belgium and working as well on stage as on set. I trained as an actor in France and have performed in French classical verse (alexandrine).

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Lucas Tavernier: I performed once or twice when I was small, but when we moved there was no opportunity to do theatre and I +/_ forgot about it. When I was in the last year of highschool (18 years) a performance was set up by the school and I participated: that woke my desire again and I suddenly realised: this is what I want to do!

SKSM: How did you become involved in Nona Dollar Baby film?

Lucas Tavernier: I met George Terryn on the set of Thuis, a major series of the public Flemish broadcaster. He worked there as a director and I as an actor. He spoke about the Project and I was very enthousiastic at the idea of working with him on an ambitious short movie project.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Lucas Tavernier: The fact that the character doesn’t seem to accept boundaries and seems to get away with this.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Lucas Tavernier: George offered the part of the psychiatrist and I agreed immediately as it would offer me the opportunity to bring tension, balance and control to a story that is constantly breaking out of its boundaries.

SKSM: You worked with Georges Terryn on this film, how was that?

Lucas Tavernier: It was nice, as he pushed the whole team to the boundaries of what was posible with the ressources we had.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Lucas Tavernier: We shot in a great location: the “Institute for Tropical Medicine” which dates from the colonial era, and has a very special atmosphere about it.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Lucas Tavernier: I kept contact with George, and sometimes I met colleagues on other sets.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Lucas Tavernier: I still work as an actor. https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1581714/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Lucas Tavernier: Not exactly: I know the major Works of course, but I really got in touch with it through NONA.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Lucas Tavernier: I recently learned to drive a motorcycle, but I won’t tell you how many times I had to pass the exam to get the driver’s licence 😉

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Lucas Tavernier: Thank you for your attention Reading this interview.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Lucas Tavernier: Thank you Oscar for this interview.

 

She played in Jordan Tandowsky‘s The Escape Plan Dollar Baby film as Carla.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mary Rachel Gardner: My name is Mary Rachel Gardner (nickname MayRay), and I am an award-winning independent filmmaker. I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area by a big Greek family. I graduated from USC in 2013 with major studies in Acting, Business and Film Production; I also spent a semester abroad studying at a theatre conservatory in London. I have been performing since I was six years old; constantly active with dancing, singing (musical theatre), and filmmaking.

I am a compassionate, dedicated, and hardworking entrepreneurial artist that intuitively knows how to properly nurture a story’s journey. Appropriate, professional attention and energy must be applied to every aspect of developing an original film or TV series, while maintaining an integral balance between the business and creative processes.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Mary Rachel Gardner: I have been passionate about storytelling and entertaining since I watched the epic, Academy award-winning film Titanic. Kate Winslet, one of my idols, truly showed how impactful you can be as a performer. I felt every emotion during that film, and knew then, I wanted to be an entertainer. It was in high school when I realized my talents, after being cast as supporting and leading roles in plays and musicals. I also grew up with a mixed balance of sports and dance. I matured into a young, independent artist who wanted to do nothing more than constantly create opportunities for a team of amazing artists to share their talents, stories, and visions.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The Escape Plan Dollar Baby film?

Mary Rachel Gardner: Jordan Tandowsky, the writer/director of the film, is a close high school friend of mine. When he graduated from the Northridge film school, he reached out to me for support. I read the screenplay and was very excited for the challenge to help him adapt and produce a Stephen King short story.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Mary Rachel Gardner: The protagonist in this story somewhat has superhuman powers; whether you read it as someone who is a schizophrenic or has multiple personalities, the stakes for him start off so high and unnerving. It’s very intriguing to see how he plans to escape with all the unique personalities and strengths he has within.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Mary Rachel Gardner: The original screenplay had flashbacks with just glimpses of loved ones. Jordan was very kind to cast me as Carla in the film and write a speaking line for me.

SKSM: In addition to playing the role of Carla you were the producer of the film. What was more difficult to do?

Mary Rachel Gardner: Producing was definitely the most difficult, as this was an ambitious project and the shooting schedule was a limited 2 days. This was also Jordan’s first time directing his own work, so at times I wanted to be patient and allow him time to create the ideal shots he wanted; but we also had a schedule to stick to and I was juggling so many departments, as well as a makeup artist who left early one day, so I had to fill in and wear many hats at once.

I also brought on a professional stunt coordinator, from the Pirates of the Caribbean film, who I had met from another film project, and that was the hardest to navigate; especially because we needed to schedule some practice time for the choreography (the talents’ safety was most important), and still create time for the actual shooting of it – the acting and stunts needed to seem believable.

SKSM: You worked with Jordan Tandowsky on this film, how was that?

Mary Rachel Gardner: It was awesome, because we go way back to high school and both were very excited to independently produce our first short adapted film together. Any time I get the opportunity to support a friend, especially when it’s their first time directing, count me in!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mary Rachel Gardner: We did our absolute best in post-production to try and piece together the sound editing along with the fight scenes. Some of the stunt choreography and acting moments were a bit off, so during the premiere screening, which was packed with the entire cast, crew and close friends, we all couldn’t help ourselves and laugh out loud. Especially when we had some featured makeup moments where one of the villains had a cigarette burned and shoved into his eye, as well as a foamed mouth after he was electrocuted by his own torture machine.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Mary Rachel Gardner: Yes, for the most part we all support each other on social media. I have hired and worked with some of the same crew on other short films I produced. I am also still very close with Joe Raffa, the lead actor in the film. He has started writing and directing more himself, having successfully finished and released several award-winning feature films. I am very excited and proud of his journey since we worked together on this short film.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Mary Rachel Gardner: I founded my own film company Kalliste Zoe Productions to explore, create and share original content through visual art and storytelling. I have developed, produced and directed many of my own independent projects including music videos, viral comedy videos and short films. I have received honorary awards at academy qualifying film festivals, such as Audience Favorite, Best Screenplay and the Grand Jury Prize, and successfully licensed some of my films overseas with the ShortsTV Channel.

Currently, I am developing original feature film and TV screenplays, as well as pursuing my acting, producing and directing career. Since graduating from USC in 2013, I have years of developing a wide range of hands-on experience with many important departments from creative production to business affairs. I am currently staying busy with some freelance work while helping others in the entertainment industry with their visions.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Mary Rachel Gardner: Yes, I am a huge fan. I read and have watched almost every adaptation of IT and The Boogeyman. I hope to work on more stories inspired by Stephen King. He is a genius, generous writer to allow access and the rights to his short stories for such an affordable price. I am eager to one day adapt and create a film inspired by Four Past Midnight, especially since he wrote it the year I was born in 1990.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Mary Rachel Gardner: I have to say that the most interesting people I have interacted with are the lovely children I care and tutor for. Not a lot of people know this, but as part of my supplemental income, I am a childcare professional and tutor. It is some of the most rewarding work I do. I get to meet so many amazing kids of all ages, races and personalities. Children keep me present, challenge new perspectives, and make me laugh beyond belief. They are our future, and how we educate, share stories, and guide them is very important.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Mary Rachel Gardner: Trust Your Instincts – many times I had moments of self-doubt, often questioning whether I made the “best” decision on something or not, but I’ve learned that in the end, trust your heart and intuitions when they are present, take action, then let go and just be. Even if I “fail” or didn’t make the “right” decision, at least I had an opportunity to learn and grow as a more open, forgiving human being.   

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Mary Rachel Gardner: My main focus as a Producer, is to protect the vision and maintain a positive, fun, creative environment for all artists involved. I am a firm believer in expanding and maintaining a strong filmmaking family who genuinely support each other’s dreams. Thus sparked my motivation to create a “giving back to the arts” sector of my film production company.

I am most proud of founding the Independent Cinema Showcase (ICS), a showcase event for independent filmmakers in order to support, promote and share their visions. I am an independent filmmaker myself, and know what it is like to first start out; it can be an intimidating industry, where you may not know anyone or have the ample resources to truly execute your vision. Therefore, the ICS family aims to seek talented visionaries and help them access a supportive network of resources; a genuine cinema family that provides help to filmmakers long term; before, during and after the showcase event.

I along with my ICS family organize three (3) showcases a year, sharing a great program of short form content from all around the world. In collaboration with many filmmakers and companies, we continue to grow a strong Cinema Family, please follow us and join our journey!

FB: Mary Rachel Gardner / Kalliste Zoe Productions / The Independent Cinema Showcase

IG: @MaryRachel13 / @KallisteZoe3 / @ICScinemafamily

He played in Taylor Doose‘s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film as the Flower Shop Owner.

SKSM: Could you start with telling us a little bit about yourself? Who you are and what you do?

Ron Hausman: I was raised on a farm in Iowa and when I graduated from high school joined the U.S. Navy and served on a ship and shore duty in California and off the coast of Vietnam. After the Navy I received my degree in Communications and Marketing from the University of Northern Iowa.  I’ve been married for 48 years, we live in Magna, UT just outside of Salt Lake City, we’ve lived in Utah for 30 years so we consider this home. I have two grown daughters one lives in Salt Lake City and one in New York City. I have been an actor for many years but seriously for the last 20 years. I retired almost eight years ago and act as well as voice over full time.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Ron Hausman: From the time I could talk. I loved watching westerns especially the people who played the second bananas or the comic relief. There are times in your life that you just remember. We were in our farmhouse, I was about 5 years old, my Mom was helping me get my coat and boots on to go out and help my Dad with chores. She said “what do you want to be when you grow up, a policeman, farmer, fireman”. My response was “nope I’m gonna be a movie star”. Now a note to the readers: I didn’t chase that dream until later in life. Don’t wait, don’t let people tell you that you can’t. Listen to the whispers in you head and follow your heart… GO FOR IT. You can always make another choice, after all isn’t that what life is about choices. Whatever you choose to do always strive to be the best

SKSM: How did you become involved in The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film?

Ron Hausman: We have a Facebook Page called Utah Actors and I saw a notification asking for submissions for auditions.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written for you?

Ron Hausman: Yes, I submitted and the sides were sent to me for the audition. The more I read the sides the more I fell in love with the character. I went to the audition and low and behold I was cast as the man in flower shop. It’s a great story and it was a wonderful opportunity to work with fabulous people.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Ron Hausman: First of all it’s a great story. It has the macabre and then the down to earth flower shop owner who may just sign his own death warrant by saying the wrong thing. That aspect of the story keeps the audience guessing, when will the philosophical flower shop owner get his. The contrast between the down to earth, philosophical flower shop owner and the killer is wonderful and keeps people guessing.

SKSM: You worked with Taylor Doose on this film, how was that?

Ron Hausman: When I’m cast it’s always a question as to how the director and the crew will be to work with. I can tell you it was an absolute pleasure to work with Taylor and his crew on this project. Taylor is an actors director and he pulls you in in a way that you are a collaborative partner on the project. His direction is to the point and he is open to ideas concerning the character.

SKSM: Was there any special or funny moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Ron Hausman: My last scene was with my on screen wife and of course I had given the speech about how one gives on rose to a woman to show how sincere he is rather than a dozen roses to show he will screw up again. Of course my on screen wife was angry with me and after she pushed me and stormed out I said “but honey I have a dozen roses for you”. That was an improve line and the director and crew loved it.

SKSM: Do you still have contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Ron Hausman: Yes, I am in contact with Taylor and his wife Julie on facebook. I joke with Taylor that if he needs a mature male in one of his movies to give me a call.  I do see some of the crew when I’m working on other projects. I may not see someone for a year or two and when I do it’s like old home week. I love this business!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Ron Hausman: COVID has really slowed me down the last year. I worked on four projects in the film industry last year and started working with a Company called Cerebral Cinema. We are narrating books, rather than on person narrating the whole book we are assigning parts to different actors to create distinct character for each book. Thus creating a movie in your mind as you listen. So far this year I haven’t done any film work but the year is young and just when I think I’ll never get cast Bingo I’m cast.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Ron Hausman: Yes, I love his work The Shining, Christine, The Shawshank Redemption, Silver Bullet, and of course The Man Who Loved Flowers are my favorites.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Ron Hausman: How about two? My first speaking role was September 11, 2001 the day of the World Trade Center bombing, and yes the filming continued. Before I started acting full time, about eight years ago, I was an actor and I sold meat. Now that isn’t an occupation they even know about at High School Career Day.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Ron Hausman: Yes, to those want to act. Always remember that acting is a very high form of service and with that comes a very high responsibility.

When I create from my head almost nothing works. When I create from my heart everything works.
Marc Chagall

She played in Taylor Doose‘s The Man Who Loved Flowers Dollar Baby film as Tara.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Chelsea Goodwin: Wow! That is a loaded questions, that I have never really been good at answering… I’ll do my best. I’m a Actress, Writer, and a yoga instructor. I try really hard to see the world around me for what it is and do my best to bring light into my personal life events, good or bad.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Chelsea Goodwin: I’ve always loved movies… but never thought about becoming an Actress until Junior High School. You see, growing up I was extremely shy, and getting up in front of a group of people would be the last thing I ever wanted to do. At a young age I was diagnosed with ADHD and a Reading Disability, which made school extremely difficult and I would get picked on a lot. I’m lucky to have a Mom who advocated for me to get through all of that, but the whole reason I became an Actress is because of her. My Mom was transferring me into a different math class, but that meant I could not take an art class, and the only art credit that was available was theater. I remember saying “No, way.” She just looked at me and said “This is exactly what you need, it will be good for you.” My Mother was right. Many years later here I am still acting. Acting saved me, it gave me a voice, and has helped me overcome a lot of hard things in my life. The moment I realized I wanted to be an Actress was my Sophomore year of High School. I was in class rehearsing a monologue and my teacher told me I wasn’t really good and maybe I should think about doing other things, I think she was trying to be nice. But the truth is, that moment I knew she was wrong, and this is what I’m going to do… I’ve been Acting ever since.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The man who loved flowers Dollar Baby film?

Chelsea Goodwin: A friend was Helping Doose cast the film and I was asked to come in… I think horror movies are fun to shoot, so I did.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Chelsea Goodwin: Everyone has a story of unrequited love, they understand how it feels to have the person they love reject them. Although The Man in this film reacts uniquely to the situation, he draws you in because is a truly a sympathetic character.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Chelsea Goodwin: I auditioned for the part, Doose wanted everyone to come in with a prepared dramatic monologue. My Monologue was from Rachel Getting Married.

SKSM: You worked with Taylor Doose on this film, how was that?

Chelsea Goodwin: It was a lot of fun. The great thing about working with Doose is he has a plan in his head, he gets it shot the way he wants it, but once that happens, he goes “alright guys, lets play, any idea’s you want to try?” He is understands the film making is a collaborative art and it takes many people to create and film. I like that. I think its really refreshing in a Director.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Chelsea Goodwin: Spoiler Alert: The scene where The Man kills me, we basically had one shot to get it right. They wanted the blood to run down my face in a certain spot, regretfully we did not get the spot Doose envisioned, but we got something close. All I can say is after I die, I was absolutely covered in blood. Cleaning up was terrible. We were at a park and I had to use the restroom there to clean up. The blood was so sticky and red. All of my skin was dyed red and I had so much blood in my hair, I could not get it all out there. Lucky for me, my Husband came with me and we covered the back seat of the car with towels and my husband drove me home. Ironically, on the way home all the blood in my hair started going down my face, just the way Doose envisioned it. My Husband also made sure to obey all of the traffic laws because could you imagine what could of happened if he got pulled over with a bloody girl in the backseat?

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Chelsea Goodwin: Of course I do. Doose and I have collaborated on many projects and he is truly one of my best friends in the whole entire world. Robert (he played The Man) and I were best friends before the movie, he actually married my Husband and I. I couldn’t imagine life without Robert. Emma (Who is Abby in the movie) We have been friends many years before we shot The Man Who Loved Flowers. I stay in contact with all three of them. I’m extremely lucky to have gotten to work on a film with such amazing people. It was a blast getting to work with my friends.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Chelsea Goodwin: With the Pandemic happening work has gotten slow, so nothing at the moment. I am writing a short film, I won’t go into details, but hopefully I can get it made.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Chelsea Goodwin: I don’t really know if I’m a fan or not. I haven’t read any of his work. I have seen movies based on his work, but I always know the movies can never really compare to the actual book.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Chelsea Goodwin: Again another loaded question… So, I’ll go with a weird fact. I’m allergic to band-aids, like any kind or brand.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Chelsea Goodwin: I hope you enjoyed the film, a lot of love went into making it. Thanks for you support.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Chelsea Goodwin: Again with putting me on the spot… ahhh no.

He is the filmmaker of The Escape Plan Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jordan Tandowsy: I’m originally from the San Francisco Bay Area, but have lived in Los Angeles for the past several years to pursue a career in entertainment (mainly in writing). These days I focus much of my time on 30-min comedy TV pilots, which I understand must be a little strange since this interview is about Stephen King. I live with my cat, Jack Nicholson, and take walks around Los Angeles whenever I can.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Jordan Tandowsy: By the time I was six-years-old, I had epilepsy, asthma, lactose intolerance, and absurdly thick glasses. Without much else to do, I watched every movie I could find on TV. The characters kept me company while I was stuck inside most days. When I was twelve, I grew out of every one of my ailments, but never lost my passion for film. I knew at that young age that filmmaking would be the path I’d pursue above anything else.

SKSM: When did you make The Escape Plan? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Jordan Tandowsy: We filmed The Escape Plan in early 2016, in two fast-paced days. We were lucky enough to get our hands on a RED camera (Dragon 5K), which helped capture shadows well in the dark room we mainly filmed in. We made the film on a budget of $3,000, sourced from various contacts. Both days of production were long, 13-15 hour days. I remember not having even a moment’s rest for the first day, so my advice to anyone out there is to schedule an extra day of production for your own sanity.

SKSM: How come you picked In the deathroom to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Jordan Tandowsy: Stephen King is just an incredible writer, able to make his characters relatable while throwing them into situations most people would not get out of alive. I chose to adapt this specific story because it felt like a twist on a normal interrogation scene. In the original story, our hero is a journalist being held by soldiers in an unnamed country. Shackled in a small room, the entire situation seems hopeless. Yet the hero’s internal monologue is witty in a way that eases the tension, in my mind a perfect character for the screen.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Jordan Tandowsy: I happened to come upon a story right after graduating film school about King writing so many stories he wanted to help students by optioning a few of them. I reached out to someone at his estate, who was nice enough to send a list of stories available and a contract to sign. Stephen King’s so gracious, the contract only asked for 1$ and a DVD copy of the final product.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jordan Tandowsy: At one point in production, one of our actors required makeup to simulate a cigarette in the eye. We didn’t have makeup on set the entire day, so he walked around most of the day with a fake cigarette dangling there. Everyone brought a lot of energy to the set, which made the whole process a lot easier.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Jordan Tandowsy: I’m mixed on this issue, because I see it from both sides. I imagine Stephen King doesn’t want to be associated with any adaptations that might be obscene, yet at the same time it was a lot of work to put this film together. It would helpful to have an internet release, and I hope it happens, but even having the opportunity to adapt his work is worth it.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Jordan Tandowsy: The audience response to the film was mostly positive and sold out multiple showings. Like anything you might make, there are things you wish you could go back to and improve. More time, more money, but you have to accept there’s only so much of both. I didn’t make this film for acclaim, though I appreciate everyone that’s said they enjoyed watching it.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Jordan Tandowsy: I’m a major fan of Stephen King’s writing, not as much so the adaptations of his work. The Shining, Carrie, and Shawshank Redemption are all wonderful, but as I’ve experienced you can never truly adapt the essence of his mastery. The Outsider is one of my favorite books of all-time, I read it in two days which is something I almost never do. The Stand is brilliantly written, moving in and out of different stories with ease. I’m finishing up Salem’s Lot at the moment actually, another great title of his.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Jordan Tandowsy: I like to imagine King has a DVD of The Escape Plan in his collection, that he watched it. But I respect his privacy and have not personally had contact with him. The fact that he gave a film school graduate like I was the chance to use his name on our production meant a lot to me.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Jordan Tandowsy: If I could get the rights to “The Eyes of the Dragon,” I’d shoot it in a heartbeat. He doesn’t usually write fantasy, but in Dragon he manages to keep the story grounded in our common humanity. It’s an incredible adventure story as well, which is just a lot of fun to see on screen.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jordan Tandowsy: These days I’m meeting with production companies and literary managers, working on finding a path in the world of TV writing. I’ve had the honor of receiving some awards and going to cities I never would’ve otherwise.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jordan Tandowsy: I’ve played a zombie character on the Robot Chicken: Walking Dead Special DVD.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jordan Tandowsy: Thanks for taking the time to hear about my experience adapting a Stephen King story, it took a lot of hard work from a lot of different people to make it happen.

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