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He played in Hendrik Harms’ Dollar Baby All That You Love Will Be Carried Away as Alfie Zimmer.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jack Frank: Hello! I’m Jack Frank, I’m an actor and I am portraying ‘Alfie Zimmer’ in Harms Way Production‘s ‘All That You Love Will Be Carried Away’!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Jack Frank: My mum was in the industry both as an actress and as technical staff. She has so many interesting stories lf how she used to look after/babysit Zach Braff when she was at stage door manor, and travel alongside various theatre companies performing just utterly ridiculous plays. I also studied Drama for my GCSE’s, which was a theory based course; we’d go and see plays, study them and write essays on the performances and staging. Alongside that I was a part of the Wycombe Swan Youth Theatre, so from the last few years of secondary school, I was completely engorged in the theatrical atmosphere!

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film?

Jack Frank: I’m a HUGE Stephen King fan (just finishing off the Dark Tower series as we speak) and I happen to follow the hashtag #stephenking on Twitter and Instagram, which Hendrik had been using when posting the casting brief. I just had to jump at the opportunity, I was so obsessed with getting this part I think I messaged Hendrik everyday until he gave me the part!

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Jack Frank: The story follows Alfie, who as a traveling salesman, is constantly on the move, not really fitting in anywhere. With that in mind, he finds solace in various messages and graffiti on the walls of his motel toilets and bedrooms, which alter how he perceives the world. There’s a lot of interesting narrative decisions that have been made and altered to play with both the character’s and audience’s minds.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Jack Frank: I wish it was written for me! Originally I sent in a self tape, which was a video of me performing a short monologue in the style of the character. I was successful, and was asked by Hendrik to have an audition over Skype! Hilariously, my microphone didn’t work the first time calling, and the wonder that is WiFi decided to lag and buffer through the entire video chat. Thank goodness Hendrik looked past all of that!

SKSM: You worked with Hendrik Harms on this film, how was that?

Jack Frank: He’s brilliant. Truly brilliant. He’s taken every aspect of the original short story, and flipped it, making it into something both faithful and unique. Interestingly we had no rehearsals other than when the entire cast had met each other for the first time. In a way, it was all naturalistic what happened in front of the camera as we didn’t have much physical preparation for the roles, other than learning our lines and reading the short story! Hendrik’s crew were equally fantastic. Each member was dedicated to making a contribution, and I really hope the audience can see that in the final product!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jack Frank: For many of the establishing shots, we had to fill the walls in various messages and graffiti, so we all had our own little inside jokes jotted down. Hopefully you’ll notice some Stephen King Easter eggs, as well as some absolutely cracking dad jokes.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Jack Frank: Of course! It was incredible that everyone got on with each other! We all actually met up again a few weeks ago to get together, grab some food and drink in Camden! We’re all massively close now, and I for one really hope that we never lose contact. Everyone’s wonderful.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jack Frank: Right now, I’m working on my voice acting work. I recently got the chance to sing and contribute to the crowd voices in ‘Rocketman‘ which was insane. I’ve really appreciated the work I’ve had in my career so far. I also have my own podcast with George Douglas called ‘How to Struggle‘ where we discuss how as creatives in this industry, we can still find work, be productive, and most importantly be happy in this industry!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jack Frank: I’m such a huge fan of Stephen King, I really struggle to read anything that doesn’t have his name attached to it. In recent years he’s come back into the mainstream, and it’s fantastic to see great work adapted into film, television and all sorts of media! I’m really looking forward to IT Chapter 2, as well as Joe Hill’s NOS4A2 which I need to get round to watching!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jack Frank: I used to be Goofy and Tigger in Disneyland Paris! A short lived adventure, but a worthwhile experience!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jack Frank: Well thank you for reading this, that’s very kind of you! I really hope that when the film is released, you all enjoy it as much as I enjoyed being a part of it.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Jack Frank: Be happy!

 

He is the man behind All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Hendrik Harms: My name is Hendrik Harms, I’m a Writer, Director and Producer and run Harms Way Studios.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Hendrik Harms: I’ve always loved films from a young age. It fuelled my passion for writing and telling stories. For a number of years I was an actor and got a lot of experience working on sets. One day after reading a string of rubbish scripts, I decided I’d make my own films. There is nothing more rewarding to me than taking a film from the writing stage, all the way through to completion. Then being able to see people enjoy what you’ve created is just an indescribable feeling.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of All that you love will be carried away or some updates?

Hendrik Harms: The film is currently without editor, so has a little work still to be done on it. To keep up to date with our progress and to see any stills of the film, be sure to check out our Facebook and Instagram pages @harmswaystudios.

SKSM: How come you picked All that you love will be carried away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Hendrik Harms: I was a big fan of the tone of the story and I really liked how the main character studied and collected random pieces of graffiti that he found interesting. We come into contact with graffiti so often and never properly look at it, so the fact that the main character not only sees it all but he views these scribblings as his friends was just a fascinating story to build on. It really fired up my imagination.

SKSM: It is All that you love will be carried away your debut as a director?

Hendrik Harms: No, this is my second film. The first was a tense horror/thriller called The Music Box.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Hendrik Harms: I did know about the other versions. I actually watched quite a few as research for our adaptation. There were some really good ones out there and a lot of them were quite faithful to the original story with a few changes here and there. That’s part of the reason I decided to change up the story. I wanted to keep the same tone but after 40 years of the Dollar Baby scheme running, I thought people would enjoy a bit of a different take.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Hendrik Harms: I am a big fan yes. 11/22/63 is probably one of my favourite stories as I love anything to do with time travel. I am also really looking forward to the release of Doctor Sleep as the writer/director of that film, Mike Flanagan, is incredible at what he does. He adapted the popular Netflix series The Haunting of Hill House. So, with his visual style and distinct type of storytelling, combined with the mastery of Stephen King, I think that film is going to be very exciting for both King and film lovers.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Hendrik Harms: Being a big fan of Frank Darabont’s, I learnt about the Dollar Baby scheme whilst looking through his back catalogue of work. I think it’s a wonderful initiative and a great platform for emerging filmmakers.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Hendrik Harms: We’ve recently won two awards for The Music Box and I’m sure there are even more spectacular things to come for All That You Love Will Be Carried Away. These successes have allowed us to begin work on our first feature, which is incredibly exciting.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Hendrik Harms: Probably that I didn’t go to film school. My experience comes from watching films and working on film sets in front of the camera.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Hendrik Harms: Just that I hope they continue to follow our journey and to thank them for all their support so far!

 

He wrote the script of Charles Alexander‘ Vinton’s Lot Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I’m originally from Shannon, Co. Clare, Ireland but found myself homeless in London at the age of sixteen. I then got 100k Euro inheritance at seventeen, which I spent in ten months before turning eighteen. I provided palliative care for my Grandmothers’ bladder cancer for five years. During that time, I lost two of my best friends to suicide and started my own family. I worked my way though both undergraduate and postgraduate degree schemes whilst raising three young children.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a screenwriter?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: Honestly, at thirty-one years old, I still don’t know what I want to be when I grow up. I believe we’ve all just got to follow our passions and see where it takes us.

SKSM: How do you communicate with a director to design a screenwriter strategy for a film?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: With great difficultly. We’ve had a number of creative conflicts on this project. The key to overcoming these kind of obstacles is to communicate with an open heart and an open mind.

SKSM: Why did you changed the original title from A Very Tight Place into Vinton’s Lot?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: It was largely a marketing decision. A Very Tight Place (2019) was already taken. That forced us to think of alternate titles. We settled on Vinton’s Lot because the land that Vinton sells in the story instigates the conflict between the main characters. But it was also a way for us to give a playful nod to Salem’s Lot. Whilst also conveying that we are approaching the source material in a way that has never been done before. By altering the gender of one of the main characters we’re exploring the dynamics of power in a post #MeToo world.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of Vinton’s Lot or some updates?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: We are currently crowdfunding for a budget. At the moment we’re at £82 with 124 views. That’s an average of £0.64p per view. If we manage to maintain that average, we only need 4k views. I’m also going to be selling my comic collection like Kevin Smith did to fund Clerks (1994). I’m going to be recording and broadcasting live from location selling comics using Peggy Phelan and Philip Auslander’s liveness debate to engage with audience using digital and physical space in real time.

SKSM: How come you picked A very tight place to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: It was completely by chance. I was drawn to the title simply because my colleagues at AMP Media had produced a film titled A Thin Place (2017). I had read the synopsis for A Very Tight Place and had a general idea of wanting to transpose the setting from Miami, Florida to Strata Florida, Wales. But it wasn’t until after I had obtained the rights that I actually read the story.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I was aware that other productions have been made. Of course I did my homework and watched as many variations as I could. It was great seeing how other people visualised the narrative. I was impressed with the majority of what I saw, but was able to draw clear distinctions between A Very Tight Place and what has become Vinton’s Lot.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I was vaguely aware, as I’m a pop culture junkie, but I was prompted by a news article I had seen and fancied my chances. Bottom line is, you don’t ask you don’t get, what have you got to lose by asking a question. I hope the press coverage from Vinton’s Lot inspires other film makers to apply for their own dollar baby. That’s why we’ve included the link to the dollar baby application on our crowdfunding page.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: Sadly, under the terms and conditions of the contract, the film won’t be available for general release. But, whilst we are crowdfunding fans can get a private vimeo link to see the film for as little as £1, but it’s a time limited offer.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I’m a massive fan. My undergraduate dissertation was actually based on ‘The Body’. I always loved the dual narrative of the writer writing about his childhood. I’ve seen most of Stephen King’s films. Although, I’m less into horror then I used to be. But Was majorly impressed by Gerald’s Game (2017). It’s an impressive feat to sustain suspense in a narrative mainly focusing on one single location. I guess in many ways Gerald’s Game shares some natural parallels with A Very Tight Place.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I’m in the process of finishing my final assignment for my MA in Creative Writing. I also clean the university swimming pool and biology department every morning. I’d hate to jinx myself but I’ve just accepted a position in the cartography department at the Welsh Assembly Government, however I’m still in the process of finalizing details. I’m also working on a graphic novel series titled 84 A.E. with illustrator Colm Harnett.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: That I’m autistic. I wasn’t diagnosed until my mid-twenties. I spent a lot of my time growing up not fitting in. Stumbling from one catastrophe to another trying to make sense of the world around me. The diagnosis gave me a degree of self-awareness which enabled me to take control of my life.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: I hope you’re all as hyped as I am for Doctor Sleep (2019)

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Jamie Matthew Dearden: Big thanks to SKSM for giving us the opportunity to show off our Dollar Baby.

 

He is the man behind Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Brian Johnson: Hello! My name is Brian Johnson and I’m the owner of 1130 Media Group. By profession I’m a Cinematographer – Director with over 30 years in the entertainment business.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Brian Johnson: I started out as an actor and was so fascinated by the technical aspects of production that shortly thereafter I went behind the camera and the rest is history.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of Uncle Otto’s Truck or some updates?

Brian Johnson: We started out two years ago but Hurricane Florence wiped us out, losing our home and all of our contents. But we are back and stronger than ever and about to take this production to a new level. We begin production in a few weeks.

SKSM: Who would be involved into this project?

Brian Johnson: Instead of bringing to the table my entertainment related colleagues, I chose to use local talent who had the passion to want to work on this King project. We do have an actor to whom has a recurring role on Netflix TV Series at the moment. We are truly blessed to have him onboard.

SKSM: How come you picked Uncle Otto’s Truck to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Brian Johnson: Growing up I was always frightened of old vehicles. Especially ones that were just sitting out in the field rusting away. Each had a story and then along comes Uncle Otto’s Truck. I knew it was my time to transfer my phobias to screen.

SKSM: I guess it’s very soon to asking this question but… where the premiere will be? Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Brian Johnson: I don’t have a particular venue as of yet.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Brian Johnson: I have not seen any of these adaptions. The great thing about true filmmakers is that no matter how many people are doing the same story, each individual will always have his vision and his take on the story.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Brian Johnson: I must say that “IT” is probably one of my favorites.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Brian Johnson: I found out about it through industry colleagues I had worked with.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Brian Johnson: I recently shot a docu-drama in Nashville and LA. The project is currently in post.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Brian Johnson: In my earlier days I had the chance to work as 1st AC for Gary Graver, Cinematographer for Orson Wells.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Brian Johnson: Know EVERYTHING from ground up and learn your craft inside out. To really be successful in this field you must be DEDICATED and work at it 24/7. It really comes down to how bad you want it and the willingness to keep going no matter how many setbacks you have to endure. Discipline is a MUST!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Brian Johnson: Please take the time to visit my web at www.1130media.com and reach out if you feel you could use my services or just want to talk filmmaking.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else to this interview?

Brian Johnson: If you want to follow the progress of Uncle Otto’s Truck with interviews and behind the scene photos, please visit www.1130media.com. We will be dedicating a page to this project in a few days. Also follow me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/1130media

 

He is the man behind Morning Deliveries Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Will Patrick Roberts: My name is Will Patrick Roberts and I am the producer of the film ‘Morning Deliveries’ based on the Stephen King short story from the 1985 book ‘Skeleton Crew’. I am based in North Wales, UK.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Will Patrick Roberts: I have worked as a runner, extra, writer, editor, photographer, security, set decorator and more on various film and TV productions like King Arthur (Warner. Bros), Spike Island, Outpost 2, Apocalypse and Separate Lies.

This is my first effort as a producer and will be my first short film. I have always been writing films, drawing storyboards, hundreds of sketches and ideas, always plotting or designing. I focused on writing for a long time, submitting to competitions and film companies to no avail. Actually one script ‘Deadbeats’ – a low-budget Beetlejuice knock-off set in a Victorian cemetery – was optioned but never produced.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of Morning Deliveries or some updates?

Will Patrick Roberts: In October 2018 I applied for the rights to make Morning Deliveries and, to my surprise, a week later I recieved a response ‘from the office of Stephen King’. On Halloween night 2018 I signed and returned the contract and started making plans.

My initial and maybe too obvious original impulse was to make a quite typical stalk and slash based on or inspired by the story. I was watching the two ‘ABC’s of Death’ horror compilation films over and over before I started writing a version. I must have watched 100 other short horror films too.

I don’t know why, but that version was abandoned. The film we are currently producing is very different and somewhere the decision was made to scrap the spin-off version and stick to the original text, word for word. As ominous and unfinished as it is.

The version we are working on still has Slasher elements but is more art-house inspired. I’m shooting it on VHS to give it a real grain, a dirty, greasy vibe like Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer or Driller Killer.

SKSM: Who would be involved into this project?

Will Patrick Roberts: One of the first things I did once getting the final go ahead was to contact Steve Swindon at Tape, a local film and arts centre, based in Old Colwyn, North Wales. I have been a huge fan of Tape and their projects and events since they opened in 2008. Steve is a cool guy, I remember one of the first things we spoke about was a shared love of the film Man Bites Dog.

I met with Steve Swindon and local film-maker and writer Andrew Turner at Tape and spit balled a few ideas with them when the project was in no shape or form. I then attended a screening of their film British Winters which blew me away. I found it really inspiring. A community effort and a great production. That was great preparation and put me in the zone for producing my first short film.

Local artist Lloyd Evans helped me go through the original story with a fine comb and drag out any images we thought could make for interesting visuals. These pre – production stages were a lot of fun even if 80% of the ideas or five different short scripts were honed then deleted. I’m happy with how it has evolved.

The Film will star Landon Sweeney as Spike Milligan and we are still casting for other roles.

SKSM: How come you picked Morning Deliveries to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Will Patrick Roberts: The main character Spike Milligan. To have such a shady, demonic character mooching about in our streets, creeping up on our doorsteps as we sleep is a disturbing thought. And the poison milk. As someone who once found a slug in their sandwich, halfway through eating, I think the thought of  someone or something contaminating your food is a terrifying and real fear.

The tarantula too.

SKSM: I guess it’s very soon to asking this question but… where the premiere will be? Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Will Patrick Roberts: I want the film to be screened between September and Halloween. I love that time of year when horror for horror fans gets that added buzz.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Will Patrick Roberts: I did see that someone launched a fundraising campaign to make a version of Morning Deliveries but I am not aware if that project was completed. If it has has I would definitely like to see it but maybe after we have finished our version. Just incase it’s so good it destroys the good faith I need at present to finish this one.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Will Patrick Roberts: I am a huge Stephen King fan. In my house growing up we had every Bruce Springsteen record and every Stephen King book. There were other musicians and authors but they were the main two.

When I was 12 I got The Talisman by Stephen King and Peter Straub for my birthday  and the protagonist in the book, Jack Sawyer, was 12 years old. I remember the journey into that story vividly, even now. I tried to read it again recently but stopped because I didn’t want to taint the memory of that journey. It would be a different book now. I can’t wait for someone to adapt that.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Will Patrick Roberts: I remember reading it once a long time ago and thinking ‘Oh. Lucky dogs’

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Will Patrick Roberts: I work as a manager 9-5 and do freelance media around that job. I haven’t been chasing film or TV crew work since acquiring the rights to this project. This has been my focus for the best part of a year.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Will Patrick Roberts: I have Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi as The Blues Brothers tattooed on my arm. A silly decision made after a few ciders when I was 16. I like the film but now they are with me for life.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Will Patrick Roberts: Watch every DVD commentary. The lower the budget the better. Even if you don’t like the film there’s no better source of inspiration than an informative and technical dvd commentary.

I hope if DVD becomes obsolete they store all the commentaries somewhere. Especially the Driller Killer commentary by Abel Ferrera. He is a wise king.

Shane Meadows, Guillermo Del Toro, the Evil Dead films. When I studied film they focused on things like the religious symbolism of Blade Runner or the significance of Tatoos in feminist cinema, which is great and cool but what I really wanted to know at that time was how the hell they bang a film together. How do you plan a production.

I’d also watch Bad Taste by Peter Jackson on repeat and then  with the volume off.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Will Patrick Roberts: I hope that we can deliver a strange and freaky short film worthy of your time and if you think it’s no good, I hope that inspires you to step up and get creative and make your own film.

Thanks, man.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else to this interview?

Will Patrick Roberts: We have just started a Kickstarter for the project which you can get involved with here. There is an opportunity to become an associate producer or even appear in the film… Thanks again.

Stephen King ‘Morning Deliveries’ by Will Roberts » Incredible Start! We are well on our way! — Kickstarter https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/will82rob/stephen-king-morning-deliveries/posts/2549809?ref=ksr_email_creator_project_update_copy

 

He is the man behind Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers? Who are you and what do you do?

Dan Sellers: I’m Dan Sellers, and I run Wreak Havoc Productions with my producing partner, Sammie Cassell. Our latest project is the Dollar Baby, Uncle Otto’s Truck. I adapted the short story into a screenplay and I serve as the film’s director and one of the producers.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Dan Sellers: I’ve been a lifelong film buff and student of the medium. However, filmmaking is not my sole profession. I began work on my first film about six years ago as a hobby. Filmmaking has since become a great passion of mine.

SKSM: Could you tell our readers the status of Uncle Otto’s Truck or some updates?

Dan Sellers: We are just about to go into production on Uncle Otto’s Truck. We hosted a successful fundraising campaign on Indiegogo in which we were 102% funded. After a lengthy pre-production phase, we’re very excited to begin shooting.

SKSM: Who would be involved into this project?

Dan Sellers: Besides, my producing partner Sammie Cassell and I, we’ve joined forces with collaborators Jeffrey Cochran, Chad Hunt and Matt Patterson as well as Mark Kingma and Thomas Hanna as Co-Producers. In the lead role of the film, I’ve casted Jennie Stencel as the Narrator and Mike Burke as Otto.

SKSM: How come you picked Uncle Otto’s Truck to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Dan Sellers: I felt a kinship with this story about obsession and paranoia. Being one of the few Dollar Babies that takes place in Castle Rock, I was excited by the idea of getting to play in this world. It’s also just a really fun little story that presents a challenge for my production company.

SKSM: I guess it’s very soon to asking this question but… where the premiere will be? Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Dan Sellers: My company owns and operates the annual Wreak Havoc Horror Film Festival. We plan to hold the world premiere at this year’s festival in Greensboro, NC on September 20th.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Dan Sellers: I assumed Uncle Otto had been adapted in the past, but I haven’t seen any other versions.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Dan Sellers: I have been a fan of Mr. King’s work since middle school! I would have to say that “The Dead Zone” and “It” are some of my favorite King novels. I also listened to King narrate “On Writing” several times while developing and writing the script.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Dan Sellers: I had been aware of the Dollar Babies for some time. However, I first became involved as a producer on a planned, but never completed, adaptation of Beachworld. After that project dissolved, I began researching the dollar baby story that spoke best to me.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Dan Sellers: Presently, most of my focus lies on preparing for our upcoming days of principal photography. I’m also heavily involved in producing a drama of which I’m very proud entitled, Sea Salt Wind that’s currently in post-production. A large portion of my free time is also dedicated to planning this year’s film festival.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Dan Sellers: My day job or professional career usually surprises other artists and filmmakers, however it’s not something I speak about publicly.

SKSM: What advice would you give to those people who want to be filmmakers?

Dan Sellers: Find a story that you’d like to tell and are passionate about and simply go for it. The best way to learn how to become a filmmaker is by simply making a film.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Dan Sellers: In addition to the movie and the annual film festival, I’d like to invite your readers to check out all of our ongoing projects at our website: www.wreakhavocproductions.com.  We currently have two horror shorts in the film festival circuit entitled Midnight Shift and Countdown to Midnight.  Finally, I produce and co-host (with Cassell) the Wreak Havoc Film Buffs Podcast and I’m also the producer and host of the Carolina Haints Podcast, a show about folk lore and spooky tales in the Carolinas.

Feel free to learn more about me at my IMDb page: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm5951114/?ref_=nv_sr_1

and I’m on Film Freeway at www.filmfreeway.com/dansellers

SKSM: Would you like to add something else to this interview?

Dan Sellers: I’d just like to extend my gratitude to Mr. King and his staff for allowing us the opportunity to adapt this wonderful story.  We hope he’ll enjoy our film!

 

She played in Polly Schattel’s Dollar Baby Here There Be Tygers as Susie.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Selah Atwood: My name is Selah Atwood. I am an actor and a competitive gymnast. I have four siblings and ten pets.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Selah Atwood: When I got the part in Three Billboards. I wasn’t an actor then, but now, thanks to my little sister who got me the part, I have now acted in several films.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Here There Be Tygers Dollar Baby film?

Selah Atwood: I have known Jennifer and Penny for years, and Jennifer asked me to audition.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Selah Atwood: It is very relatable, everyone has been afraid of something, or been bullied in some way.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Selah Atwood: I auditioned for this part, and had a lot of fun working with Penny.

SKSM: You worked with Polly Schattel on this film, how was that?

Selah Atwood: I loved working with her. She had a great sense of humor, and made this project very fun. I would love to work with her again in the future.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Selah Atwood: I enjoyed every minute on set. It was super cool to see everything come together.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Selah Atwood: I still hang out with penny, and one of the girls goes to my gymnastics.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Selah Atwood: I am continuing to audition for films. I am also doing a summer Shakespeare program where we will be performing a youth production of King Lear.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Selah Atwood: I love the premise of Here There be Tygers, but I haven’t read a lot of his work.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Selah Atwood: I play guitar and have a band with my older sister. We have written three or four songs.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Selah Atwood: Thank you to Jennifer and Polly for making this possible. It was an amazing experience.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Selah Atwood: The cast and crew were super fun to work with. I am glad that I had the chance to participate in the project. Susie was super fun to play.

 

 

She played in Polly Schattel’s Dollar Baby Here There Be Tygers as Charlie.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Penny Munroe: My name is Penny Munroe. I am a musician, actor, and I’m going into 7th grade. I have been acting since I was five years old and I have been a part of many of my Mom’s horror films.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Penny Munroe: I think I was influenced by my Mom since I saw her acting and I thought it looked like a lot of fun. Eventually I just started and I really enjoyed it. My first acting gig was a commercial for Purina One where I got to act with my family and my dog.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Here There Be Tygers Dollar Baby film?

Penny Munroe: My Mom wrote the adaptation with me in mind as the main lead. It was a super fun character for me to play.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Penny Munroe: I think bullying is a very important topic that needs to be talked about more. This story is about a girl who is treated badly but through she it all she finds her power and learns to respect herself.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Penny Munroe: My Mom wrote the part with me in mind.

SKSM: You worked with Polly Schattel on this film, how was that?

Penny Munroe: Polly Schattel was a great director. She was super fun and she pushed and the other actors to do our best. And overall the outcome was awesome.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Penny Munroe: My costar Selah Atwood and I are friends outside of acting and it was a really fun experience to work with her. We were asked to do graffiti on the mirror in the bathroom which is an easter egg for Stephen King fans and we kept doing it over and over because we were being perfectionists. Also, the scene where Selah had to be so mean to me was very funny to film because Selah is such a nice person. I teased her about her ability to be so mean.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Penny Munroe: Yes, I do. I know a lot of the kids that worked in the classroom, along with Selah, and I had worked with a lot of the crew before. I worked with Greg Hudgins before on another horror film called “Ghost Image” so it was cool to work with him again.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Penny Munroe: I’m currently signed with Carla Hough at Bold Talent and I do auditions for different shows. And I’m working on some new projects coming out soon including another short horror film “The Ebbing.”

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Penny Munroe: My Mom thinks I’m too young to read his books but she’s a very serious fan of his work. She was super excited to do this short film and we literally have all his books.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Penny Munroe: That I like to mountain bike and that I have been playing an instrument and singing since I was six years old. Also, I am a lead singer in a band.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Penny Munroe: I hope everyone enjoys “Here There Be Tygers” and I think it will do very well. I think that it’s a story that people can relate to and enjoy.

 

She played in Polly Schattel’s Dollar Baby Here There Be Tygers as Miss Bird.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers?

Jennifer Trudrung: Hello! My name is Jennifer Trudrung and I am an actor, writer, runner, reader and most importantly a Mom. I have a production company called Night Frizz Productions and I have been writing and producing short horror films for about five years now.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a producer?

Jennifer Trudrung: I started off in this industry as an actor. I love acting but it can feel like you are giving up a lot of your power because so much of the industry is do your best work and then wait and see. And sometimes you hear about projects you would just love to work on but you perhaps don’t even get an opportunity to audition for the show. I found that through writing and producing my own work I could express myself and give myself the roles and opportunities that I wanted as a creative person. And I get to work with my children, fellow amazing acting friends, and filmmakers that I admire and trust.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Here There Be Tygers Dollar Baby film?

Jennifer Trudrung: I have always loved Stephen King. I started reading his books while in middle school and I just could escape and thrive in his worlds. I love his characters and stories and obviously I love being scared. I love horror. Quite a few of Stephen King’s books have been adapted and filmed in the South East region of the United States where I live. I had several opportunities to audition for speaking roles in some of his shows but so far have never been cast. After attending several film festivals where my own films were screening I got to see several Stephen King Dollar Baby’s. At first I was intimidated at the idea of adapting one of his short stories but I was also inspired to try. It is on my bucket list to work on one of the shows based on his works so I thought, “here is my opportunity to do it myself and do it my way.”

SKSM: Can you tell us about your work in the film?

Jennifer Trudrung: I wrote the screenplay adaptation of the short story “Here There Be Tygers”, helped in casting the film, produced the film, and starred in it as Ms. Bird.

SKSM: What was it like to work with Polly Schattel on this film?

Jennifer Trudrung: I was thrilled when Polly Schattel met with me and expressed her desire to work with me on “Here There Be Tygers”. I had worked with Polly before as an actor in the beautiful Ben Lovett music video called “Black Curtain” and had admired her other films. She is one of the nicest people I know also besides being incredibly talented. I told her of my initial idea for the screenplay and she pushed me to make it darker and more profound. I had had an idea in the back of my mind of where I could go with the story but was afraid to change the original story so much. But when I saw her enthusiasm and had her full support we went full force ahead. She was supportive and fully invested from the get go and her work on this film is amazing. I am very grateful.

SKSM: In addition to playing the role of Miss Bird you were the producer and the screenwriter of the film. What was more difficult to do?

Jennifer Trudrung: Honestly, the producing part was the most stressful because of putting all the pieces together, hiring the crew, finding the locations, doing all the communication, and getting the cast in place but I am surrounded by an incredible creative and supportive film family where I live. I had so many people step up and express interest in being part of this project. Everyone worked at a reduced rate but gave me 100% effort and investment. However, when I was on set the hardest part was letting go of the ‘producing’ part and finding the character of Miss Bird. I would forget I was going to have act and then boom it was my turn. This was where Polly really stepped up. She led me to a great place for the character of Miss Bird. And boy did I love playing her.

SKSM: Was there any funny things that happened while filming (Bloopers, etc)?

Jennifer Trudrung: The funniest part of making this film was that I played the evil Miss Bird and my daughter Penny Munroe played Charlie who I just got to be so nasty and vicious with. We literally were playing characters who despised each other. And we had so much fun with it. I think having such a tight familial bond full of love made the creative part of truly ‘bringing it’ for the characters easier. It was a safe place for all of us. Even Selah Atwood who plays Susie who is the main bully in the film is one of Penny’s best friends. They were cracking up between takes. It felt like a true family affair and was really fun.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jennifer Trudrung: I LOVE Stephen King. My favorite books by him are “The Shining” and “The Stand.” But I literally own all his books. And I admire him hugely as an political advocate and an ally for decency and human rights. I LOVE his twitter page. I would love to meet him and just say “Thank you.” He is an inspiration in so many ways.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jennifer Trudrung: I am actually working on two feature length horror screenplays. One of them called “The Bewailing” might be produced by a local film company which I’m super excited about. I’m currently working with them on revising the screenplay. The other one is called “Spectrum” and I have submitted it to numerous screenplay competitions and film festivals and I’m hoping for the best. “Spectrum” has already been a quarter-finalist in the We Screenplay Feature Screenplay Competition and the ScreenCraft Feature Screenplay Competition.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jennifer Trudrung: I’m a former National Park Service Park Ranger. I’ve worked out in the Needle’s District of Canyonlands National Park, White Sands National Monument, and the Curecanti National Recreational Area. I also am ridiculously shy which I have had to really work on overcoming. And honestly having children, especially daughters, has forced me to learn to speak up and stand up.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Something you’d like to tell our readers?

Jennifer Trudrung: I think the thing I would like to share is that if you find something you love then go for it. I’ve learned that everything takes time and a lot of hard work. And that sometimes it can be depressing and you will want to give up. Being creative is full of rejection. But keep going. Take those baby steps. Do those little things that make you feel better and plug ahead. But also let yourself breathe and mourn when you need too. I feel like I’m making progress by literally scrambling up a hill but it’s working. And be kind and supportive to others. This industry is all about net working. So be the best person you can be and others will want to work with you and support you.

 

She played in Tyna Ezenma’s Dollar Baby Dedication as Darcy.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Paula Lauzon: As a child, I’d always enjoyed appearing in school plays. Even though life had many different twists and turns for me, I was eventually able to get back to my first love, acting, and returned to the stage via Community Theater.

I began my relationship with the Little Theatre of Fall River (LTFR) company, by being part of the ensemble cast of Jesus Christ Superstar and Titanic-The Musical. After some time, I eventually became well known for my role as “Aunt Eller” at the Little Theatre of Fall River’s October 2013, production of R&H’s Oklahoma. Myself, along with the entire cast, received rave reviews by Tony Annicone of Don Gillis’, Little Rhody Theatre.  Joined by my son, my final stint with the LTFR was in the production of Monty Python’s Spamalot. It was during this final production that I began doing “extra” work for a variety films and commercials.

Eventually, I broke into both nationally and internationally known music videos such as, The Portuguese KidsThrift Shop ParodyKing Lil G’s Cold Christmas, and most recently, Franz Ferdinand’s, Feel the Love.  I can be seen in a variety of national ads from Lyrica (print ad), as well as TV/video ads.  My face has become quite familiar in Ring’s, ‘Secure Mani/Pedi’ Commercial, Jardience, Glucerna, and Chase.

I have had roles in student films and short films, all of which have been submitted and won various awards at Film Festivals around the Country.  I’ve also had roles in Unusual Suspects, Murder Book Mystery, VETTv, Deadline: Crime with Tamron Hall, and can be seen in many more various television shows and movies.

My journey of moving out to Los Angeles is good one: Armed with a dream and a vivacious personality, I’d done something most middle-aged adults would find frightening, even crazy, but had proven that taking chances is not just for 20-somethings.  While still living back East, I’d attended master classes with Steve Blackwood, former Bart Biederbecke, of Days of Our Lives.  After approximately a year’s worth of classes, he told me that there was nothing more he could teach me that I didn’t know and I should head to LA.  With my son’s blessing, I followed his advice. I sold or gave away what I could, packed what little was left over, into my car, and drove myself across the Country.  I arrived in Los Angeles with $40 in my pocket, and with the help of some very close friends, I’ve been able to accomplish my dream of becoming a working actress.

I’d taken classes to hone my acting skills by attending classes with Sara Wallace at Jodie Lynn Panek’s Studio, Acting Up Network, located in Burbank, CA.  Prior to being taught by Sara, I’d had been tutored by the well-regarded Brionne Davis of the same Studio.  I enjoy archery, weaponry, photography, swimming, tennis, volleyball, dancing, singing, floral arranging, and I do have hosting on-camera and teleprompter experience.  My dialects include (but are not limited to) Boston, New York, Rhode Island, Maine, Brit, Aussie, South African, Irish, and Mid Western.

I was born Maria Paula Lauzon, in Fall River, MA.  My mother is the late Maria A. Lauzon, born in Relva, St. Michael, Azorean Islands (Homemaker/Seamstress) and my father is the late Paul M. Lauzon, born in Fall River MA, a former U.S. Postal Worker. With the knowledge and love of old Hollywood stars and musicals, westerns and History, it was my parents, who forged the acting path for me. I am also the proud mother of an adult son, who is the joy of my life

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Paula Lauzon: Gosh, I was SO young;  elementary school young;  I would dream about it, watching the old movies with my parents, especially my father.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Dedication film?

Paula Lauzon: I became involved in this film, by being approached by Tyna Ezenma, who saw my Profile on the Backstage Platform.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Paula Lauzon: “Dedication” is the story of a maid working in a hotel who uses a black magic spell in the hopes of harnessing the talent of one of the hotel’s frequent guests-an eccentric writer-and passing it on to her unborn son.  I’m sure that the use of black magic is something that might attract people to this story as well as the fact that it’s an original book by Stephen King.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Paula Lauzon: Neither;  my work, my resume’, and headshots are on various Social Media Platforms, and Tyna, doing her research, came across my work on the Backstage Platform and was impressed with what she saw.

SKSM: You worked with Tyna Ezenma on this film, how was that?

Paula Lauzon: I found Tyna to be an extremely Seasoned Professional, even though she’s new to this field.  She’s an award-winning photographer and film maker who has won 3 International Photography awards and is passionate about the Creative Arts.  She’d reached out to Stephen King directly to ask about his book and I find that she is a go-getter in a field that has been dominated by men for many, many years.  She’s extremely patient and articulate in what she’s looking for, when directing a scene and I really liked working with her.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Paula Lauzon: Well, we had some good laughs on-set and those would be what I would determine as ‘location or you had to be there jokes’.  Special moments for me, would be when we were doing less than 3 takes to get a shot.  As an actor, from my point of view, I understand what my Director is looking for and work with them, to get both our points across when telling a story.  She was very happy to get the shots in as little takes as posible.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who? 

Paula Lauzon: Only Tyna, from time to time, especially when she’s letting us know where the film is being seen at a Festival and any awards or nominations for the same may be given.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Paula Lauzon: I’ve actually got my plate just a bit full, which is not a bad thing;  I’ve recently returned from a trip to Boston, to attend my son’s graduation from Bridgewater State University where he graduated Summa Cum Laude;  I’m SO proud of his accomplishments in that respect.  I’m also coordinating our move back East, to North Carolina, where I’m signed with another Agency who is representing me from NYC to the SE Corridor, (Atlanta) and has been submitting me and I’ve been auditioning for, via video auditions.  I’m still auditioning here, in LA weekly, and booking work monthly as well.  I’m also a Judge for the Burbank International Film Festival, and have been reviewing short films, student films and screenplays for the Festival.  As well,  I am a Member of the Television Academy and have been attending events through the Academy.  I’ll be returning to LA, on an as-needed basis, to audition and book work and, I’ll be returning in the Fall, to attend the Burbank International Film Festival as well as the Academy Awards Ceremony.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Paula Lauzon: I am a SUCH a fan of his work.  I began reading his books, at a very young age, probably 11 or 12, when I picked up one of his books at the Public Library; ‘Pet Semetary’.  I don’t know what I was thinking but, I read it in a weekend, because I was so immersed in it and could see his entire story, unfold in my mind.  All I could think to myself was, who is this crazed man, that could write such a thing?  But I just couldn’t put it down!  Needless to say, I was scared the entire time I read that first book, but, I continued on to acquire more of his books from the Library, because I loved how he wrote his stories.  The second one I read from his was, ‘Christine’.  With that book, I was still many years shy of getting my driver’s permit, but, I was sure that any car I got near, after reading that book, was going to come to life!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Paula Lauzon: Hmnnnn, this is a good one and you’d probably need to ask people that know me, but, I’ve been told, that, I give ‘Off the Chart Hugs’, I train SuperHeros and I embrace my Heritage, specifically, my Portuguese Heritage.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Paula Lauzon: I would love to thank our entire team for the hard work and effort that was put into making this film, to Stephen King for writing ANOTHER awesome book, Tyna for adapting it into a screenplay and, of course, our fans for supporting our entire team’s visión.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Paula Lauzon: Keep an eye out for more great work by Tyna Ezenma as well as myself.

We’re both here for the duration and have a lot to offer our fans!

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