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He played in Vyacheslav Vlasov‘s In The Deathroom Dollar Baby film as Boris.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Andrey Kalfa: My name is Andrey Kalfa, I am 44 years old. I am an entrepreneur in Russia and this has already said a lot. But in addition to my main work, I write poems, songs and sing in my rock band “Plan B”.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Andrey Kalfa: Probably each of us dreamed of becoming an actor as a child.

Personally, I participated in all the productions in high school. Once, in a New Year’s Eve performance, I played several roles at once. One of them was the role of a Steam Train that was captured by cowboys! And I prayed with real tears in my eyes that they would not shoot, because I have small children at home-Steam Locomotives! Haha, it was fun!!!

But if we talk about the professional activity of an actor, then my Father did not allow me to go to university to study acting. Alas.

SKSM: How did you become involved in In the Deathroom Dollar Baby film?

Andrey Kalfa: Well, I’m an adventurer by nature. Therefore, when I saw a nice Russian guy on TV, Vyacheslav Vlasov, who was giving an interview about the beginning of filming the film, I immediately wrote to him and offered to help in organizing the process. So I started asking to be an actor. To which Vyacheslav gently replied that there would be a general casting! A couple of weeks passed and he sent me a text, the role of Boris. In the description of which, I quote: Boris, a man of 30 – 35 years old . He has a solid build, and is ready to resort to torture to get information. Aliluya!!! It’s me xD

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Andrey Kalfa: I’ll be honest. I haven’t read this story before. After reading the script, I was a little confused. He didn’t look like Stephen King. It feels like it is taken out of the context of some other story. But the task was set by the director and we tried to solve it.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Andrey Kalfa: Yes, of course, as I already said, there was a casting. The first one in my life by the way. It was very exciting. When I went to the casting, I wanted to turn around and go home. I thought, ” Well, who am I?, probably this is not my thing. But what the hell is not joking, I took a chance. M-yes.

At the audition, everything was like a fog, and even after it, the fog remained in my head. And one fine morning. Boom. Letter: you are cool, you are invited to the role. The feeling is incredible. But immediately it became scary again. After all, now you will have to work for real . And I really wanted to match my role and not let my colleagues down.

SKSM: You worked with Vyacheslav Vlasov on this film, how was that?

Andrey Kalfa: In a word, it’s Fantastic. A young director, young actors, a cameraman. In one breath, we worked for a couple of days until the morning. This is beyond words. Something new, unusual and very interesting. We were very tired, but our emotions were off the scale.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Andrey Kalfa: Well, of course, there were some curiosities. At some point, we were writing my dialogue, the first take, the second, the director doesn’t like something. And somewhere on the fifth or sixth take, my tongue begins to slur and some nonsense begins to come out of my mouth. The whole film crew begins to giggle, but with each take the situation worsens and the nonsense becomes absurd, respectively, we just start laughing and rolling on the floor! I had to call a break.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Andrey Kalfa: Probably on the same night, after the shooting, we created a chat in WhatsApp. We called this chat by the way “Children of corn” (hi Stephen!) And we still correspond. Recently, we congratulated each other on the birthday of Stephen King.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Andrey Kalfa: At the moment, everything is trivial, routine, job. But I hope everything can change for the better soon.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Andrey Kalfa: I am a kind person!

SKSM:Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Andrey Kalfa: Read books, watch movies, and be alive and real in life!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Andrey Kalfa: Thank you for the interview, it was very pleasant for me. Thank you for your work! Peace to all!

He played in Vyacheslav Vlasov‘s In The Deathroom Dollar Baby film as Alexander Holodov.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Alexander Stulnev: My name is Alexander Stulnev. I am 23 years old, a native of Astrakhan. I have been leading an active lifestyle all my adult life. I am an honorary volunteer in the southern region in social and environmental areas. At the moment I am writing my projects, because I want to change my city for the better, and in the future I will go from the city of Astrakhan. In addition, I am an artist and create art objects from recycled materials. @ovpqvo

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Alexander Stulnev: I never had a dream of becoming an actor, but it was always interesting to try myself in this direction.

SKSM: How did you become involved in In the Deathroom Dollar Baby film?

Alexander Stulnev: I was offered to play the main role by my good friend, the director of the film Vyacheslav Vlasov. And since I love active movements, I liked the idea. This is the first time in the history of the city such an event. I thought why not become a part of history, and I agreed.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Alexander Stulnev: Everyone who came across this story was confused by the ending of this story. This simply can not be! It seems that we understand that the main character is going to die now, but deep down we believe that he will be able to get out of this situation.

SKSM:Did you have to audition for the part or was it writtendirectly for you?

Alexander Stulnev: I have already worked with Vyacheslav Vlasov in his first picture. Apparently, he saw something in me and offered to star in a new movie In The Deathroom. And I did everything possible to justify my hopes.

SKSM: You worked with Vyacheslav Vlasov on this film, how was that?

Alexander Stulnev: The shooting lasted for six months, as the events took place at different times of the year. During this time, a lot of things have changed in my life. I’ve experienced ups and downs. But at the time of filming, due to the friendly team and the support of the director, emotions were always at the limit.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Alexander Stulnev: It is difficult to choose, since there were a lot of them. The team was selected from very creative and positive people. I will note one moment that I remember very much. During the filming of the main scenes, late at night, when everyone was tired, the director’s fiancee Irina made a surprise for the entire film crew and brought pizza. It was a very special moment.

SKSM: Do you still have anycontact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Alexander Stulnev: Yes, of course, we keep in touch. We have a common chat. I keep in touch with almost everyone, not only in social networks, but also in life.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Alexander Stulnev: At the moment, I am very passionate about working on personal projects.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Alexander Stulnev: I have a lot of respect for people who have achieved success with their talent and Stephen King is no exception. But unfortunately I don’t like horrors.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Alexander Stulnev: Many people are surprised by my view of life. At a time when almost everyone is “running over their heads” to become billionaires, I am content with little. And I want to change the world, and not live this life thinking only about myself.

SKSM:Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Alexander Stulnev: Think not only about yourself, there are so many lonely people in the world who need support. And make the world cleaner!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Alexander Stulnev: Thank you for such an interest in our project, it was very nice to answer these questions and remember once again how our shooting took place!

He is the filmmaker of The Hammer Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Roman Alekseev: My name is Roman Alekseev and I am from Russia. I live in the city of St. Petersburg. I work in the Okko online cinema as a technical support specialist. Directing is my hobby.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Roman Alekseev: At first I dreamed of becoming a writer. It sounds like a clich?, but I was inspired by Mr. King. Then I came to try myself as a screenwriter, and only then I thought about directing and even enrolled in evening training. It was then that I shot my first adaptation of The Man Who Loved Flowers. The film was visually better than Hammer, but no different from the story.

SKSM: When did you make The hammer? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Roman Alekseev: To make a film and pay the team, I sold a smartphone, but then there was isolation and I had to improvise. I shot the film in a couple of days on my wife’s smartphone and she also played the main role. The film cost almost nothing. My goal was to surprise with the concept, since I thought that others would make the story exactly the same. Hope I was able to surprise.

SKSM: How come you picked The man who loved flowers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Roman Alekseev: I already shot a film based on this story, but it was an unofficial adaptation. I read the story and was surprised that the author was able to catch me waiting. The end was unpredictable. I fell in love with the story and it was then that I began to take my first steps in directing. I decided that I would shoot a film for myself and it would be a great skill training.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Roman Alekseev: When I made that movie, I didn’t know King was selling rights for a dollar. Andrey Popov wrote to me and asked if it was possible to take my film to participate in Dollar Baby, and I replied that it was possible. Then, having delved deeper into the topic, I decided that I would remove the official film adaptation and bought the rights to The Man Who Loved Flowers. This is how the “Hammer” appeared.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Roman Alekseev: It’s funny that the adaptation was completely different. The film has changed beyond recognition and a lot had to be thrown out, but then it was decided to change everything from scratch. The idea of ??bait for a maniac came up unexpectedly, but now I want to expand this idea. I’ve always liked stories about strong women.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Roman Alekseev: I would really like everyone to be able to see my film for free, but according to the terms, I cannot show it anywhere. I would also love to know what King thinks about my film. Feedback is always good. Art should belong to the people!

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Roman Alekseev: Reviews were generally mixed. Those who read the story liked the film, but there were people who simply did not understand it. Many were confused by the vertical format of the shooting. I drew conclusions and will try to fix everything in the future.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Roman Alekseev: The film is already participating in various festivals, but due to the ratings, I doubted its promotion.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Roman Alekseev: Apart from the obvious adaptations of The Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile, I like It, Carrie, Pet Sematary. The Dark Tower series has stolen my heart forever. I would very much like to see her adaptation.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Roman Alekseev: Alas, no. Communication was through an assistant. I would really like him to see the film and express his opinion, but I understand that such a busy person simply will not have time. He probably doesn’t even know about my existence.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Roman Alekseev: I would like to make a film based on the “Grandfather” story, but the rights to it are not being sold. I really like the concept. The story could scare me.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Roman Alekseev: Now I’m writing a script for a full-length film, and then I’m going to ask the studios for money to shoot. Hope it works out.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Roman Alekseev: Do not know. I didn’t communicate with other people. I hope they don’t think anything bad.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Roman Alekseev: Thank you for giving me the opportunity to answer the questions! I want to say this: Never stop being afraid of the monsters under the bed!

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Roman Alekseev: Yes, if someone wants to watch my film, then write and I will try to arrange an individual session 🙂

He is the filmmaker of If You Tell Your Dreams They Won’t Come True Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Yonatan Weinstein: I am an Israeli editor, writer and director based between New York and Tel Aviv. Currently, I devote most of my time to editing narrative feature film & television content, as well as developing original narrative content with my writing partner.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Yonatan Weinstein: When I was 13, I decided to make a little film for my Bar Mitzvah celebration and soon fell in love with the craft of editing. Through this process, I met my first mentor in the field and with her guidance decided to embark on my next challenging journey to document my grandmother Masha’s story of holocaust survival. A couple months of filming and nearly two years of editing later – I completed the feature doc “My Grandma – Frau Masha” and started taking it to festival audiences around the world. The surprising and satisfying success of this first project motivated me to learn more about filmmaking and explore other aspects of it. Above all — the first-hand experience of listening to my grandma telling her story and the process of molding it made me appreciate the power of storytelling in ways that I couldn’t imagine.

SKSM: When did you make If you tell your dreams they won’t come true? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Yonatan Weinstein: We filmed and completed “If you tell your dreams…” towards the end of 2011 (nearly a decade ago!), with the intent of submitting it as part of my application to NYU Tisch’s film program (spoiler: it worked J). I structured the script as practically a single scene (barring the exteriors) set in one location (my aunt’s home) and we only had two short days to shoot it. The skeleton crew and actors all volunteered, and the self-financed production budget came out to just a couple thousand dollars, mostly used to cover the equipment rental, meals and art.

SKSM: How come you picked Harvey’s dream to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Yonatan Weinstein: When I first read it, the story struck me immediately for several of its distinct qualities.

First there was this unique tone and tension to it – a sense of mystery and foreboding conveyed without any cheap scares or hardly any action at all for that matter. I was also drawn to the challenge of taking a story comprised almost entirely of internal monolog and finding creative and effective ways of conveying all that subtext while relying on the performances and visual elements alone (rather than voice-over). Then there was the relationship itself, that of an estranged middle-aged couple left in their empty nest who – despite decades of history, affection and shared experiences – find themselves questioning what it is that drew them together in the first place; though I was at an entirely different point of my life (as a 21-year-old in his first adult relationship), I found myself really curious to explore that dynamic. Finally, there was this all-powerful thematic question of where the dream world ends and the real world begins; I found this extremely appealing to explore as, in a way, I’ve always considered that gray area to be the epitome of what film as a medium is all about.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Yonatan Weinstein: I decided to adapt the story and went ahead with production without even knowing about King’s Dollar Baby Program. Only after having completed the film, when I wanted to submit it to festivals, did I look up sorting the rights and found out to my great fortune that ‘Harvey’s Dream’ was one of the stories covered by the program.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Yonatan Weinstein: This is the absolute opposite of funny, but a story worth telling… We had just nailed the first shot of the first day (which so happened to be the opening shot of the film), and despite already being couple hours behind schedule, were feeling pretty good about what’s next to come. And then, my DP Roi Vissel gets a phone call – his grandfather had just passed away and the funeral is about to take place (incidentally, the irony of receiving such a fateful call on the set of this particular film is not lost on me…). Naturally, Roi took off, but not before going over the rest of the day with our AC and Gaffer and devising a plan. The camera team all switched positions to cover for his absence and somehow, we managed to more or less make the day. The next morning, Roi was back on set assuming his role with utmost professionalism, despite the tragic circumstances. I’ll never forget his devotion to this film. Having collaborated on several projects since, he remains one of my closest friends, extremely talented and my go-to DP to this day.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Yonatan Weinstein: To my knowledge the film has never been formally reviewed, but all the reactions I’ve ever received were very positive (though perhaps those who didn’t like it never bothered to tell me haha.) Despite this being my first independent narrative short and the fact that a lot of the decisions taken in its making were very intuitive, ten years later people still seem to find the film surprisingly effective, seemingly much thanks to its contained nature and specific point of view.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Yonatan Weinstein: Nothing planned ahead (as I mentioned, the film is already a decade old), but it has participated at the Cannes Festival’s Short Film Corner in 2013, as well as the National Film Festival for Talented Youth, and is featured by ‘Film Shortage’ online.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Yonatan Weinstein: I do not feel I know King’s oeuvre quite well enough to call myself a fan… That being said, I was really drawn to his writing in the pieces I have read and am a great admirer of some of the brilliant cinematic adaptations of his work, including De Palma’s Carrie and above all – Kubrick’s masterful The Shining.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Yonatan Weinstein: I have not been in contact with Mr. King unfortunately and am unaware of him having seen it. Naturally, I would love for him to see the film and to find out what he thinks of it. I have seen a couple other adaptations of ‘Harvey’s Dream’ though, and while I know I am biased – I do believe my version somehow better manages to capture the essence of the original story, despite having the language and culture completely transposed.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Yonatan Weinstein: I do not have such plans at the moment… But if allowed, I would love to try and do it again someday.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Yonatan Weinstein: I am currently developing original drama series for Israeli Television with my writing partner, Barak Barkan. Otherwise, I’ve been working mainly as an Editor in recent years, having recently cut a production of Beckett’s ‘Waiting for Godotstarring Ethan Hawke, John Leguizamo and Wallace Shawn, as well as the HBO Max show Valley of Tearsand the Israeli Best Picture Winner Incitement’.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Yonatan Weinstein: I’ve been nominated for two Israeli Academy Awards for Best Editing! (Third time is the charm… ;).

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Yonatan Weinstein: Thanks for reading! Please check out the film as well as some of my other work on my website and feel free to reach out and share your thoughts.

He is the filmmaker of In The Deathroom Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: I was born and raised in Russia in the small city of Astrakhan, which is known all over the world as a fishing city, fishing, as well as red and black caviar. My parents have a not very popular, but necessary profession. My mother is a medic, and my father is a firefighter. In 2021, I graduated from the “Astrakhan State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering“. Now I am a certified fire safety specialist, just like my father. But despite this, I hope that I will be able to break into the real world of cinema and directing!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: Since childhood, I have had a great interest in films and cartoons. When I was 5 years old, I manually drew frames for my cartoon, and played them on a movie projector that my father gave me. There were problems with the Internet in our small town, and there were no creative schools where I could develop my animation skills, so I was engaged in training on my own. Later, a computer appeared in our family, and with the help of such standard programs as paint and movie maker, I created my own cartoons.

Later, when I was 11 years old, I saw a documentary on television about the Russian director Leonid Gaidai (Ivan Vasilievich: Back to the Future). After that, I fell in love with the entire shooting process of the film. Later, my parents bought me a cassette camera, and I began to develop my camerawork skills and shoot my first short films, namely, I wrote scripts, prepared props, and of course forced my friends to be actors xD

SKSM: When did you make In the deathroom? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: It took a lot of time and effort to create the film «In The Deathroom». Thanks to the fact that I agreed to cooperate with me on a free basis, and also our sponsors helped us, who provided us with equipment, equipment, lights, microphones, etc., I managed to save a lot of money. In total, it took $200 to create the film. As it turned out, in our small city of Astrakhan, they love Stephen King, which is probably why I managed to find sponsors and people who were ready to give us props, premises, etc. for free.

We shot «In The Deathroom» on different days and at different times of the year. This caused some difficulties, since the weather in our country is unpredictable. We wanted to shoot the scene wait (according to the script, it should be dry and warm), but on the day of filming, snow fell and it got terribly cold. We postponed the chase scene for half a year. As a result, it took us 6 days in different months and seasons.

SKSM: How come you picked In the deathroom to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: At that time, I was very interested in this story. Several characters are in a closed space, where no one sees or hears them, and solve the problems of the country’s government. It was interesting to show all the torments and experiences of the main character, especially in the Russian realities of the 90s.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: When I graduated from the St. Petersburg School of Television, I started looking for some useful information for myself on the Internet. How can I move forward as a director? And so, on one of the American sites, I found out that Stephen King still sells the rights to his stories for just $ 1, and you can easily contact them.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: We shot “In The Deathroom” at different times and in different seasons of the year. According to the script that I wrote based on a story by Stephen King, there should have been snow in the last scene where the main character buys and lights a Marlboro. I was very worried about this, because it happened that snow never fell all winter. But I was very lucky, because unexpectedly for everyone in our city, snow fell in November and we quickly took the cameras and ran to shoot that very last scene.

It was also very nice that we managed to contact the famous Russian dubbing actor Peter Glants (the Russian voice of Deadpool, Ben Stiller, etc.), who voiced the newsreader in our film.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: It’s a shame to realize that not everyone will be able to watch “In The Deathroom“. The whole city is watching you, rejoicing in your victories and supporting you in your failures, but at the same time they can’t look at the film. I really hope that soon I will be able to agree with the office of Stephen King and publish the film in the public domain. But I think that it will not be soon.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: Mostly I received positive reviews. It’s amazing that everyone evaluates the film differently. Someone says that the actor does not play his role well, someone is satisfied with it, but complains about the sound in the film. Someone likes the music, but does not like the volume of the sound. How many people have so many opinions 🙂

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: I want to participate in the One Dollar Baby Russia festival, as well as other Russian and foreign festivals. I also hope that one day there will be a film festival in our small town, where I will be able to show “In The Deathroom“.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: Yes, I love the work of Stephen King. One of the favorite adaptations is Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining”, Frank Darabont’s “The Green Mile”, and Rob Reiner’s “Misery”

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: Unfortunately not. I sent the finished film on a DVD with a beautiful design and a letter. I hope that there will be at least some answer from the King of Horrors!

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: At the moment, my plans include shooting a film based on my own script. Maybe sometime in the future I will take part in One Dollar Baby again. It would be interesting to work on “Stationary Bike”. It is very difficult to show a psychological struggle with oneself in the film, but I love complexity and am ready to face them.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: Now I am promoting «In The Deathroom» at film festivals and writing a script for a new feature film that I would like to shoot. The main task is to find producers and film studios who would agree to cooperate with me.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: Everything is amazing for our small town, and of course I was no exception. Many people in our city do not know about the Dollar Baby project and therefore were very surprised that a young guy from the province was able to sign a contract with Stephen King. Regional news, newspapers and television were immediately interested in me.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: I hope that you enjoyed this interview. I really hope that in the future everyone will be able to appreciate not only my film, but also the films of other directors shot as part of the One dollar baby project. This will give future directors more motivation to work on their debut films.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Vyacheslav Vlasov: Thank you to Oscar Garrido and all those people who are interested in One dollar baby and gives an opportunity to newcomers in the field of cinema to express themselves and tell people about their film.

 

He played in Sean Patrick Bridges‘ One For The Road Dollar Baby audio production as Booth.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Hi! I’m Kenneth Wayne Bradley, and I play Booth in One For The Road Dollar Baby! I’m a film, television, and theatre actor, living in Central Texas with my wife, Cathy, and our two felines! I’m an avid Baseball fan (some would say obsessed!), exercise everyday (gotta keep this body a goin’!), and live very close to my parents, who are my best friends! I am represented by the best team in the business, the rock solid team of Collier Talent, who are like that energizer bunny fella–they never stop working for me!!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: I honestly cannot think of a time when I didn’t. When I was very small, maybe 5 or 6 I used to climb up onto my grandma’s garden fence and perform a variety show for her yard. Maybe her Cat would watch me, sometimes she would watch, but mostly it was just me singing, telling corny jokes and doing acting skits for 2 or 3 acres of cut grass!  When I was old enough to go to school, I deeply admired the acting troupes that would tour through our elementary school doing plays and skits for us. I always sat there watching them in amazement wondering, “How can I GET TO DO THAT? I wanted to be up there WITH them! I wanted to be ONE OF them! Later in High School, I got involved in drama class and did plays and and then was fortunate enough to attend Sam Houston State University which had (and still has) a world class Fine Arts Program for Theatre and Dance. When I got out of college I started doing professional plays, but also landed an agent and became involved in film.

SKSM: How did you become involved in One for the road Dollar Baby?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Sean reached out to me. We had worked together before, and really wanted to collaborate again on something. When he landed this project he called me, very excited about it, and after reading his adaptation, I could not wait to get to work!

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: The characters. They are so rich and well rounded and universal. Anybody, no matter what walk of life they come from, can relate to these people.  To me, that is the key element to a successful story NO MATTER WHAT YOUR SUBJECT might be.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Because Sean wanted to use me in another project of his, I did not have to audition for this part.  That is very rare…and a gift.  But I don’t believe he WROTE his adaptation of the story with me in mind. Sean stayed true to Mr. King’s original material.

SKSM: You worked with Sean Patrick Bridges on this film, how was that?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Sean And I worked together once before this, and we really hit it off in the first project. We were both dying to work together again, so when this opportunity presented itself, we both jumped at the chance. Sean has a brilliant and creative mind, he is open to input and collaboration and his style is relaxed. He creates a nurturing environment for the actor to explore and find him or herself in his pieces. THAT is gold and it’s also probably a good reason for his success.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Sean probably has hours of hilarious outtakes that, if he chose to share, would probably consume an entire project of it’s own. Lets just say that, while our focus was on delivering a professional polished product, we also had a hell of a lot of fun in that studio.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so, with who?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: A lot of them I do, yes. Some of them, like Ken Webster (who plays Tookey), I keep up with on almost a daily basis because as well as being colleagues, they are also good friends of mine. The Austin theatre and film communities are a tight-knit bunch of folks. For the most part, we pretty much all know each-other, keep up with everyone’s careers, show our support for each-other and occasionally get together over a few beers or tequila shots.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Next up is a series pilot that I’m shooting in North Carolina. Because everything travels so fast on the net these days, I’m not allowed to say much about it other than the fact that the character is much different than the one I played in Sean’s piece.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Absolutely! Is that even a question? You mean, there are people that aren’t???

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Because I’m a big and sometimes very brash Texas country boy, I think people would probably be hard pressed to peg me as a “cat guy.” Yeah, I’m a closet “cat guy,”  who dearly loves his two furry demons. Mickey and Macy follow me everywhere like two puppies, no matter how deep into the woods I walk. They’ll stop to rest when I do, and then they always follow me back home. They also basically OWN my house.  They simply allow my wife and I to live there with them.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Thank you for this question, because without the fans, what are we? Fans, I think you’re going to LOVE this adaptation by Sean Bridges! We had so much fun putting it together for you! Now just close your eyes, and listen… It’s going to be a helluva ride baby!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Kenneth Wayne Bradley: Yes, Thank you! Thank YOU for this opportunity, and again, thank you to all the folks who support entertainers and the entertainment business. We wouldn’t be here without you, and for this specific opportunity we are forever grateful! Anyone like a celebratory 100% Agave shot?? (Smiles Big!)

He played in Sean Patrick BridgesOne For The Road Dollar Baby audio production as Gerard Lumley.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Heath Allyn: I am a wearer of many hats! I’d say actor (voice and on camera) and musician are the two most prominent but I’m also a writer, director, producer, and many other things. Polymath some might say though it’s likely super pretentious. In this day and age it’s helpful to have many diverse skills which works out well for me!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Heath Allyn: For as long as I can remember from childhood. I’ve always loved movies, television, and theatre. I made my first stage appearance at the age of 11 in a community theatre production of “Beckett.” My mother had been involved in community theatre since before I was born and so she was toting me along to rehearsals from birth! I still have this vivid memory as a child when I had these shoes that had “A.S.” on the side of them (I’m sure that was the brand or something) and I would pretend I was a spy named “Alan Scott” much like James Bond or something.

SKSM: How did you become involved in One for the road Dollar Baby?

Heath Allyn: June Griffin Garcia and I knew each other from the entertainment business around Austin. She was helping cast “Triple Six,” another audio drama by Sean Bridges and I can’t remember if she reached out to me to audition or if I just submitted an audition on my own, but I was cast as “Contestant Yellow.” So when Sean and June were casting for “One For The Road” they asked me to audition for Gerald Lumley. Luckily for me they liked what I did!

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Heath Allyn: Well first you have Stephen King who seems very widely regarded as the king of the genre and obviously has a huge fanbase. Then of course, vampires have a pretty huge fanbase as well! Add in the suspense, terror and relationships between these characters and it keeps you riveted and on the edge of your seat for sure.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Heath Allyn: At first Sean said that he really wanted me for the part and thought that no one could do it like I could, which was extremely flattering. At some point he and June decided that they should at least audition some folks for it so I was asked to send one in, which I gladly did. In the end Sean said he was glad to know his first gut instinct was right!

SKSM: You worked with Sean Patrick Bridges on this film, how was that?

Heath Allyn: Sean’s great! Which is why I’ve worked with him twice now. Very easy to work with, upbeat, and just a friendly guy. Plus he really wants to make something great. He cares about the quality of the finished product and works harder than anyone behind the scenes on many aspects of it.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Heath Allyn:  Obviously it was a pretty intense script with real emotionally raw moments for my character and others, but we tried to also keep it light between takes. It can definitely be a little strange when you are there in a recording studio with a few others and then have to give a few different variations on an anguished scream or such. I definitely liked the fact that most of us were there in the room reading with each other which isn’t very common in voice acting but it’s nice to work directly off your fellow actors.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Heath Allyn: I think I’m at least Facebook friends with almost everyone, which I know isn’t a substitute for in person friendships, but in a busy world (and now a pandemic-filled world) it’s nice to still see what people are up to and be able to keep in touch so easily.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Heath Allyn: I’ve had a few commercials recently, I’m starring in a comedy musical play called “Boomtown” by Texas Comedies starting in two weeks, plus still playing in many different musical projects (including a new “Yacht Rock” band I formed called “Yacht Z”), making music from my home studio as well as doing voice work. I just finished narrating the second season of “Music’s Greatest Mysteries” on AXS TV as well. I always have a lot of irons in fires as is necessary for a working actor/musician!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Heath Allyn: I’m not actually a big horror person which I always hesitate to say as I don’t want to alienate any potential employers! Just because I don’t consume it much doesn’t mean I don’t like acting in it! That being said, what I have seen and read from Stephen King I’ve loved!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Heath Allyn: That I’m actually a pretty shy, geeky, homebody. Being an actor and musician who can sometimes seem confident and outgoing can be misleading. I am comfortable on a stage or while performing, but off stage/mic/camera I don’t want to bother people and fear that maybe sometimes I seem distant or aloof but it’s just me not wanting to impose myself on others.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Heath Allyn: I truly appreciate you taking the time to talk to me and anyone who takes the time to read this. Though I’ve been doing this for 40ish years now, it has never lost its magic for me. I still enjoy it as much as that kid who wanted to be a spy named “Alan Scott.”

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Heath Allyn: I once played Banquo in Macbeth and a reviewer said that I was “Abundantly audible.” I’ll never forget that as it still makes me laugh. I mean, that’s not a bad thing. I certainly aim to be audible. In abundance.

He is the creator of One For The Road Dollar Baby audio production.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Sean Patrick Bridges: My name is Sean Bridges. I was born in Germany, and have moved around all my life, but I’m happy to call the Texas Hill Country home. Here’s my current bio which highlights some of my creative work:

Sean is the author of On the Bayou, 11:34 and Roll of the die.

He produced and directed two documentaries in the Caribbean. Out of many: One struggle for education about school kids getting a second chance in Kingston, Jamaica. And 20/20 Vision a look at the development of a global financial hub in Port of Spain, Trinidad.

He’s a Nicholl award-winning screenwriter. He’s worked on projects with Robert Rodriguez’s Troublemaker Studios. He started Audible Parade in the Texas Hill Country; they created Triple Six, a Las Vegas based serial audio thriller.

SKSM: When did you make One for the road? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to finish it?

Sean Patrick Bridges: I signed the contract in January 2020, and got right to work adapting the story. We moved through pre-production pretty steady until Covid brought life to a halt.

The cast and I were able to get back into the studio during the summer (with necessary precautions). My editor Heather Bridges and I dove into post production through late summer and deep into the fall.

With final artwork in place from Andy Johnson @Grayson Designs, I completed the production and submitted it to Stephen King by the end of the year.

It was an out-of-pocket budget of US$3500. Cast & Crew were willing to work way below their normal rates or even for nothing, simply because they wanted to be a part of bringing this Stephen King story to life.

SKSM: One for the road is the very first official audio-only Dollar Baby.  Why did you choose this format instead of shooting a film like usual Dollar Babies?

Sean Patrick Bridges: It’s a happy surprise that we’re the first-ever audio dollar baby. I discovered the world of audio stories through the Austin Film Festival and fell hard for the concept. It’s a throwback to the way we used to tell stories, like vintage radio, but using modern audio techniques. It’s a marriage between old and new.

At Audible Parade we have full casts working their scenes together in the studio. Combine that with sound FX, music and ambient backgrounds and you create a movie for your mind. Cinema through your headphones. It’s a brilliant way to bring scripts and stories to life.

I had just completed my first full-length audio production. A suspense/thriller entitled Triple Six and was very happy with how it all turned out. When I was accepted to be a Dollar Baby, it seemed like the perfect fit for our next audio production.

SKSM: How come you picked One for the road to develop into an audio production? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Sean Patrick Bridges: Night Shift was the first Stephen King novel I ever read. My dad gave it to me when I was in middle school, and I fell hard and became a life-long fan. Anything I’ve done creatively can be traced back to that kid in school carrying one of his novels around in my backpack.

And as a thank you to my father, I added him into this cast. You can hear him paying for drinks at Tookey’s Bar. I get a kick out of that every time I hear him. I was able to bring my dad into the Stephen King universe.

I remember being unnerved by One for the road when I first read it, and the story never lost its luster. When I saw the list of available Dollar Baby choices, it jumped right out at me. I re-read the story and knew it was the one. Plus, I had written a werewolf western screenplay and a sci-fi / Frankenstein script, so I really wanted to create a vampire story to add into my creative portfolio. And this vampire story was perfect to adapt. A chance to play in ‘Salem’s Lot. I’m still floored I got to do that.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Sean Patrick Bridges: This will show my age, but I remember watching the first set of Dollar Babies on a VHS tape. They released three of them as a compilation. And even back then I thought, wow what an amazing opportunity. I wonder how you could ever get the chance to make one of those?

Fast forward a couple decades, and I was reading an article (I believe it was from Den of Geek) that explained the history of the Dollar Baby and it had a link to the Stephen King website, along with the home page of the actual program.

They weren’t accepting any more requests that year, so I tagged the website on my phone and forgot about it. Until early 2020, when I checked out the website again and they were open for new applicants.

I submitted a formal application. The response made me feel like I won a golden ticket.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment in the production that you would like to tell me about?

Sean Patrick Bridges: There’s a nod to George Romero in the production. George Romero and Stephen King were close friends and collaborators for decades. And in the film, Day of the dead, the paperback of ‘Salem’s Lot appears in a scene. So since One for the road is a companion piece to that novel, it seemed fitting to have an Easter egg to a Romero zombie movie. As Booth is scanning through different stations on the radio dial, there’s a little snippet of Night of the living dead on one of the stations.

Special moments. You never know how production will actually unfold but this one was surprisingly smooth. This has been one of my favorite ensambles I’ve gotten to work with. I have to thank June Griffin Garcia casting. With her help, we were able to bring together a great group of professional actors.

The bulk of the story is really carried by the three leads, and they had to stand toe to toe with each other. If there was a weak link among the three, the whole project would have fallen flat. As we were recording some early scenes in Tookey’s Bar, having Ken Webster, Kenneth Wayne Bradley and Heath Allyn work together was such a thrill.

There were times when I knew I had what I needed as a director. But it sounded so good I’d have them do the scene over again, just to hear it play out live in the studio.

SKSM: This audio production won a Gold Medal from The Audio Fiction & Arts festival and it’s been selected to play at international film festivals. Could you talk more about that?

Sean Patrick Bridges: At the beginning of 2021, I started sending the production out to a number of film and audio festivals. We’ve been fortunate to hit a few. There’s still a dozen plus to decide before the end of the year so I don’t want to jinx it. But if we’re able to rack up some more festival laurels, that’s an even wider spotlight for our work.

I’m pleased with the finished production and proud of our work. I’m very happy with how it turned out. If the festival circuit enables people from all over to check it out for themselves, that’s the best kind of recognition you can get.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received about One for the road?

Sean Patrick Bridges: Honestly, I don’t think enough people have heard the completed production yet. I’m open to reviews, and let the chips fall where they may, good or bad.

The festival circuit helps showcase our work, as well as interviews like this. But I’m definitely interested in getting our version of One for the road out to the widest possible audience.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Sean Patrick Bridges: Stephen King taught me to learn to love to read. That’s probably the best compliment you can give a writer. And through him I discovered a number of authors and books.

I have a soft spot for Christine. Years ago I helped my father re-build a Triumph TR-6 and we listened to the oldies radio station as we brought that car back to life. That book will always be a sentimental favorite of mine.

The dead zone, Firestarter, Different seasons, The running man are books I find myself returning to time and again, just to get a spark of what I felt when I read them for the first time.

The drawing of the tree is a classic, but I lost my way through the bulk of the Dark Tower epic. Thinner. That was the first book I ever read cover to cover, I just couldn’t put it down.

Adaptations. I really enjoyed the director’s cut of Doctor Sleep. And Gerald’s game was a fantastic adaptation. Mike Flanagan knows how to bring King’s books to the screen and stay true to the source material. The Shawshank redemption & Creepshow. All-time favorites that never get old. I’m always up for a rewatch.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Sean Patrick Bridges: Not yet. I followed the contract, hit my budget and delivered a completed production during the allotted time. That was my job. But I always figured my work would go on the bottom of a very large pile. My contacts with his office has always been friendly. But yeah, Stephen King’s reaction will be a cherry on top to this whole wonderful experience.

SKSM: Did you ever think about turning this production into a movie?

Sean Patrick Bridges: I set out to create this as an audio production and I think it works on that level. It currently clocks in at 42 minutes.

But if we received serious producer interest in bringing my script to life as a film, of course I would be onboard. I can already see where I could flesh out the existing story into feature length.

SKSM: Do you have any plans on making another audio production or a film based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story, which one would it be and why?

Sean Patrick Bridges: Roadwork or The running man. I would relish the chance to turn either of those into full-length audio productions. I mean, in a heartbeat. Man, I’m smiling just thinking about that.

When I looked at the list of available Dollar Baby stories to choose from, my close second pick was, The last rung on the ladder. It’s a bittersweet story that I would love to bring to life. But I would tackle that one as a short film. I can even see the barn in my mind as I type this.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Sean Patrick Bridges: Our next full-length audio production will be based on a ghost story I wrote, 11:34. Coming in 2022.

And I’m currently in the midst of my next novel, an action/thriller entitled, Gunbarrel Highway.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Sean Patrick Bridges: My whole life, I’ve always been a dog guy. But since I moved to rural Texas, I discovered a calming connection with horses, chickens, deer. Different animals just seem to like me. If I knew that when I was younger, I could’a been a vet.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Sean Patrick Bridges: Thanks for taking the time to read it. If you’re interested in more information on existing and upcoming audio productions, check out audibleparade.com

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Sean Patrick Bridges: Sure. Did you know Stephen King has his own radio station, out of Bangor, Maine. WKIT, 100.3. Dollar Baby audio productions seem like a good fit. I could hear them playing across the airwaves. Couldn’t you?

She played in Anna Shapiro‘s Derailed Dollar Baby film as Mila.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Maria Ryshenkova: My name is Maria Ryshenkova, I am from Russia. I am a theatre and movie actress. My main place of work is Russian Academic Youth Theater (Moscow).

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Maria Ryshenkova: I was dreaming of becaming an actress since childhood. Although it was a moment of weakness when I wanted to became a road trucker. My father is an actor so i spent a lot of time in the theatre where he worked (Vakhtangov Theater). That’s the place where my dream was born.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Derailed Dollar Baby film?

Maria Ryshenkova: Anna Shapiro invited me to this project.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Maria Ryshenkova: Whatever we believe we can’t know what awaits us after death. And I think this is what attracts the most. I am very impressed by the ambition of my character Mila, to move forward and go ahead no matter what, despite of this new unknown reality, and not to lose her beloved ones.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Maria Ryshenkova: I didn’t have an audition. Since Anna was familiar with my roles in the theatre, she made me this offer and I was very glad to accept it. I think that it was a very interesting creative experience for all of us.

SKSM: You worked with Anna Shapiro on this film, how was that?

Maria Ryshenkova: I enjoyed working with Anna, it was easy and interesting. She is a very deep, reflective and sensitive person.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Maria Ryshenkova: It was really long ago, about 8 years ago… I remember we with my partner Viktor found out that our cameraman was looking like Hemingway. That was funny and that’s how we called him between us: Hemingway.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Maria Ryshenkova: We are colleagues with Viktor Panchenko, we play in the same theatre. So we are still inseparable. Our last premiere is “Romeo and Juliette”, where Viktor plays Tibalt and I am the queen of the fairies, Mab.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Maria Ryshenkova: I am not a fan of Stephen King, but I adore “The Green Mile”. And I find amazing Frank Darabont’s movie! I really enjoy watching this movie again and again. And I respect Stephen King’s work, he is very professional and talented.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Maria Ryshenkova: Be healthy and happy! Believe in yourself! Be kind and do good!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Maria Ryshenkova: Thank you, Oscar, for this conversation! I was so glad to look back saying “Wow, this is happened to me! Great!” I consider Derailed as an attempt, a bit immature student work, but at the same time so necessary for all of us at that period of time. Thanks to Stephen King for giving us this opportunity to discover and comprehend the universe of cinema!

He played in Anna Shapiro‘s Derailed Dollar Baby film as Yan.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Victor Panchenko: My name is Victor. I’m an actor. Mostly I play in theatre for about 12 years now allready. And I dreamed to play there first and only after that in cinema. But when I was about 5 years old I loved to watch movies of the 90’s with fightings and so on, and I remember once I said that I’m going to be a famous film actor. This dream has not become true yet.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Victor Panchenko: I decided to become an actor in the end of the school after I saw my first drama theatre perfofmance wich I visited thanks to my friend. Something happened inside of me. Intuition told me that this might be mine. But first of all – I studied very bad at school, didn’t understand anything. Secondly – I though started realising that I’m not so dull as the the school marks declaired and that I want to be interestd in something but school at that moment hadn’t enough tools to make knoledge a happy thing. I started reading books and started to think of my self different. I asked my self questions like about what I’d love to do for living. The key word was Love in that question. And several conditions appeared- It should be something real (remember my school marks) , something creative (???) and something that would give me education and provocate a journey in to my self. And then I thought that it would be great to be a director (theatre or film, no matter) and I’ve had I heavy talk with my father that brought down my selfworth deeper than it was and after what I lost any believe in my self. Then I started visiting courses in a polititian institute, thanks to that friend again. And felt so shameful that I couldn’t answer simple questions about history. I felt It wasn’t mine. So I took the least innerstrength I had and decided to become a theatre actor. My mother payed acting clases for 6 months (for what I’m greatfull to her) , with a theatre actress we prepared a program and right after school my dream came true. It was a big luck and at the age of 17 I became a student of the Russian Academy of Theatre Arts in Moscow (for free) with out any experience of being on stage, school drama class or something like that. After what my Master invited me to his theatre where I still play.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Derailed Dollar Baby film?

Victor Panchenko: I was involved in Derailed mouvie by chance. The director Anna Shapiro saw me in theatre if I’m right and our common friend told her about me I think. But I’m not sure.

SKSM: You worked with Anna Shapiro on this film, how was that?

Victor Panchenko: Working on the Derailed was hard because it was very cold and I had very less of experience in cinema.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Victor Panchenko: Now I’m working on producing theatre performances and continue playing in theatre.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Victor Panchenko: I’m not a fan of Stephen King  but I read the Shawshank Redemption and saw the film for about 50 times not less.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Victor Panchenko: I would like to say to whom it may concern -actors, editors, playrights, artists, musicians and so on and not only, anybody –

It’s not a shame or crime to have a dream and to follow it, to obtain it (if it’s positive and crimless of course)

It’s good for an artist to be friends with his head, with his brain, his psichologie. It’s better to know your self good, to treat your self well , to accept and love your self and know what you want before acting or creating and so on, because artists (actors , directors, musicians etc.) with deep problemes mostly make depressive art pieces (as I think, It’s my opinion) and it doesn’t cause much pleasure or happiness, It’s all about suffering mostly that causes next suffers. Some can like it of course but it should be realised I think. Art should be healthy, meaningful but healthy, vital and the main purpose of it should not be the changing of the world or something like that but mostly just for the life’s beauty.

And It’s good to have some other skills besides in case of failure or hunger. Life is not only about art, there are many other interesting things.

And it’s important to remember that failures in art are very usefull. Such failure as I think is my work in Derailed. I’m not ok with my job there. But who could know how It’s gonna be in the result.

Thank you. And good luck.

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