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He played in Tyna Ezenma‘s Dedication Dollar Baby film as Peter Jefferies.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Lawrence August: Hey there! I’m Lawrence August… I grew up in the Chicagoland area and currently reside in Los Angeles, California.

I’m a published songwriter, part-time actor, wannabe screenwriter, and a full-time Self-Employed Nutritionist, with a focus on Childhood Obesity.

I help run a non-profit organization called Accept The Challenge, which aims to improve the health of children all over the world.

I love pursuing my passions and am very fortunate to wear so many hats!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Lawrence August: I acted in school plays growing up and was always a bit of a ham, entertaining my friends and family with silly impersonations of celebrities and what-not.

It was really in my college years when the acting bug bit me… I performed in several award winning stage plays and landed some really great roles. To be honest, acting was something that came a bit easy to me, in terms of comfortability. In many ways, I’m more comfortable on a stage as a character than I am as myself.

Luckily, I have so many other interests (as mentioned earlier), that I don’t feel a huge amount of pressure to “make it” as an actor. It’s a wonderful outlet and a great way to tap into the human condition.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Dedication Dollar Baby film?

Lawrence August: I was very lucky in that I had already worked on a pervious project with the director called Ghostwriter, where I played The Devil, and she liked my work.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Lawrence August: I think this particular story pulls people in with how unique and unsettling it is.

The Black Magic element is interesting and when you mix in the racial dynamics between the characters, the vibe of the hotel setting, the eerie backstory and fascinating motivation of the protagonist (played Amazingly by Cameo Sherrell, btw), you end up with something unlike any other Stephen King story.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Lawrence August: I did not have to audition for the role, but the role was not written for me. I was very fortunate to have been offered without having to read for it.

SKSM: You worked with Tyna Ezenma on this film, how was that?

Lawrence August: I’ve worked with Tyna on three films so far and she is great.

She keeps a very relaxed set, and gives actors a lot of space to explore and find the scene. At the same time, she knows very much what she wants and has a knack for communicating her vision with very concise direction.

Wonderful to work with!

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Lawrence August: Hahahaha… well… yeah. Not sure how much I should go into it, but… one standout moment was when my character is having to “pleasure” himself in bed. This was somewhat awkward, with the crew members gathered around and the camera hovering above the bed, but I got through it and everyone was very professional. Definitely a special moment.

Oh, and I guess the other cool moment was when I snapped a photo of Cameo standing on set while the lighting was being set up. What stood out to me about the photo was the shadow of Cameo cast onto the wall near the bed. It felt… inspiring.

During my downtime, I played around with editing the photo on my phone, playing with the colors, contrast, etc. and it ended up becoming the poster for the film. That was what I would call a “happy accident”. I still can’t believe how that came to be. Magic!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Lawrence August: I’m in contact still with Tyna and Kerry-Ann Ellington, who by the way, I’d like to thank for introducing me to Tyna and getting me the role in Ghostwriter, which led to Dedication.

Cameo Sherrell is a Social Media friend and I’m always happy to see her thrive in the industry. She’s a brilliant actress. I’ll predict right here and now that she will be a household name one day. Believe it.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Lawrence August: Nowadays, I’m very busy with the work I’m doing as a Nutritionist and my nonprofit, but I also stay busy in the music studio, writing songs, and am looking at a few scripts that could be potential acting roles. I also have a sports comedy script that I’m writing with a friend in West Virginia.

Always something on my plate.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Lawrence August: I am, but I wouldn’t say I have looked at his entire catalog. I loved the film Misery, probably my favorite.

Other faves are The Shining, Carrie, Stand By MeFirestarter… probably a bunch of others I can’t think of right now, haha.

The man has been incredibly prolific. It’s actually baffling how someone can crank out that much material, and actually keep the quality so high.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Lawrence August: Probably that I rap. I’ve been rapping since I was 14, and can freestyle for days. Haha… most people are pretty surprised at that.

I think people that know me as their Nutritionist are surprised by my artistic side and the people who know me through the arts are surprised at my Nutrition knowledge.

I like it that way.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Lawrence August: No problem!

I’ll just say that I’m really thankful to have been in such a cool film and I hope whoever sees it will enjoy what we created.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Lawrence August: Be kind to each other. It’s what we need now in the world, more than ever.

Kindness. It doesn’t cost a thing.

He is the screenwriter of Simon Pierce‘s I Am the Doorway Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: My name is Jeffrey Stackhouse and I’m a Sandwich Delivery Boy. But let’s break that down, a bit:
I began in theater: after school in England I was an Assistant Director of  a lovely College Theater above Baltimore for a few years until I left for NYC. There I performed professionally in Baroque Opera for 5 seasons before moving on to New Music, wherein I created leads in 14 musical workshops and had pieces commissioned for me by the likes of Aerosmith’s producer Paul O’Neil and the original director of Jesus Christ Superstar & Hair, the amaaazing Tom O’Horgan.
I came out to CA to work as the villain of the best musical I’d ever encountered, Jon Stothers’ terrific Pilgrim, and got to watch someone brought on board flush $3M of investors’ money down the tubes. So: not that.
I then did some film, my favorite on a great indie project called The Crusaders that won Best Comics Film at Comicon, worked again with New Music composers, developed a then-pretty-severe case of Vitiligo that made me shy of auditioning and felt I’d move on to my 4th or 5th Entertainment Career … Decided writing horror screenplays was more stable, because I seemingly have no firm concept of reality.

SKSM: How did you become involved in I am the Doorway Dollar Baby film?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: My wife Wendy and I had been co-writers previously on a Spaghetti Western that won The PAGE Awards, and we were lucky enough to be selected for two of Mr. King’s stories, this and “The Ballad Of The Flexible Bullet.” We discussed it for a while and decided that “Bullet” was pretty much perfect as Prose and we could thus only equal it or fall short. “Doorway” however was Body Horror, and that has a bunch of lenses to view it through. Transformation is very fertile ground.
I often work with co-writers, and had just come off of what I felt was a successful collaboration with Richard Becker on an award-winning Military Horror called “Handful Of Dust” and we hoped that Mr. King’s name would be enough of a spotlight that we all might rise a bit, and so Wendy and I approached Richard as a valued resource and began talking the beats and approach.  My original thought was to create a film in the style of Argento and Cronenberg: a beautiful and lambent jewel that framed this absolutely brutal and terrible story, and that was our attack.
Now two years earlier, I had seen Simon Pearce’s feature horror “Judas Ghost” at Shriekfest Film Festival and it blew me away.  The acting was well directed, the shots were intriguing and served-the-story, the forward motion was intense.  But important for this project, his feel for color palate was beautiful.
After the screening, I had made damn sure he knew my thoughts, and I’d kept in touch, so I was able to pitch the project to him, and he was intrigued. And because he’s a consummate pro, he was able to attract the likes of DP Phil Meheux (Casino Royale, Mask Of Zorro) and Illusion Industries (SPFX for Pirates of the Caribbean) to the film.
“How did I become involved…?”
I was verah verah lucky.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: As I said, I think the subject of transformation is a very powerful one; in whatever Genre you play it, there’s an inherent resonance. Wendy and I are proud to be parents of a Trans child, and because it came near the beginning of Society’s wider recognition, we were involved with a lot of the “discovery” aspects of such. I came to realize that “change” is a very brave act. Our astronaut may or may not be quite so brave.

SKSM: You said you worked with Simon Pearce on this film, how was that?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: Simon was very open to listening to my thoughts on the piece, and to my initial approach, which was the lynchpin. He’s a good ally to have and brings extraordinary talent and work ethic to a project.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: Thanks to the Intertubes, I’m still able to interact a bit with our terrific leads, Simon Merrells and Grant Masters, and look forward to being able to see them bring their nuance and gravitas to other characters, some day. There’s a strong and enigmatic Spaghetti Western lead Wendy and I would love to see SM take on, and Grant would be a wonderfully creepy Doctor Richard and I have throughout the framing of an Anthology of ours.
Simon Pearce and I “speak” more often, and still gaze wistfully at a couple of Features we’d like to get going, but his newest film “Officer Down!” has had his attention, lately, and I look forward to seeing that.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: I’ve been working with another co-writer, Renfield Rasputin and developed with him a New Orleans set Horror Pilot about a damned priest, that won a major award, and also a current proof-of-concept Short-for-Feature about an EMT who takes a rescue call during a hurricane and finds a tortured angel in the old man’s shed. Those are great fun. And I’ve finished a Feature on my own about clever students in a School in England who figure out a way to replace our Universe’s God with another, but have to sacrifice literally everyone, just to get Its attention. Turns out it’s a love story, lol. That one might end up a novel, as well, since it’s too expensive for someone at my level, to get made.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: He’s probably my favorite living “voice.” I‘ve reread all of his work at least once and physically have all of his novels – one of our 18 bookcases is just his stories. I like to say that Roger Zelazny is like having your smarter older brother tell you a story, and Stephen King is like your best friend reading to you around a campfire, at night. Comfort food, for me.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: I’ve already done the Baroque Opera and New Music beats. Surprised? I enjoyed major-character voicework on a lot of Japanese Anime, including Otomo’s (of Akira fame) first feature Harmageddon and the legendary La Blue Girl (oh, you can Google, I’ll wait… Hentai is a world to itself). That might at least be intriguing, if not new to my circle..

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: For screenwriters, learn formatting (I’m a Trottier baby) and then Tell Your Story.
The only storytelling tool you need is having read Joseph Campbell or Frazer, and damn your Education System if you haven’t already. Generalized Beat Sheets create generalized pap; how many great Screenplays have those gurus actually written?
On that, realize that all of the filmmakers of the 30s–60s had a storytelling vocabulary built upon what they had read. Even those great visuals that our filmmakers imitate today originated from a lifetime of sharing worlds with great authors.

— Writers in general: Be unafraid.  Stop asking permission.  Many folk before me have said you can’t edit what isn’t on the page, so write. And it’s alright to have written crap; silk purses from sow’s ears, amiright?

— For life? I’m absolutely the wrong person to take that advice from, but I will mention don’t suffer fools (“waves”) and surround yourselves with those who are kind.

But also, be kinder to yourself.  Realize you’re not alone.  If you’re down, reach out to people who might help. Those thoughts are more common than you think. Much.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Jeffrey Stackhouse: I have the start of a website at ShadowlandOnline.net that you might want to check, but it’s only a beginning and some pretty graphics.
Thanks so much for this opportunity, Oscar, and for your patience for my getting it done.
— My best to all of you out there. Stories can change the world. I hope you step forward and make some of that change.

He played in Thad Lee’s All That You Love Will be Carried Away Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Rhes Low: I live in Oxford, MS with my wife and our 4 kids. Although, I spent the bulk of my life in the entertainment indudstry (mainly in L.A. and NYC but recently in the southeastern US) several years ago I changed direction. I am now Director of Strategy for an integrated marketing and communictions firm- Red Window Communications.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Rhes Low: I always knew. The decision to pursue the craft as a profession came toward the end of my junior year in high school. My time until then had been Split between golf and theatre. After being accepted into the theatre program at Southern Methodist University, I dropped other activities and focused 100% on the acting. By the way, in hindsight, dropping other activities was not a good idea- as actors we draw from our experiences, therefore we should exuberantly explore other hobbies, art forms, and activities

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will be Carried Away Dollar Baby film?

Rhes Low: The director, Thad Lee and I met in L.A. and kind of grew up together in the industry. I will always work for him – if he asks, I’ll say yes.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Rhes Low: Trying to overcome a broken world.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Rhes Low: It was adapted and written with me in mind.

SKSM: You worked with Thad Lee on this film, how was that?

Rhes Low: Thad’s preparation is extremely detailed and thoughtful. He is a pure artist with a very defined visión – and yet within that visión, he allows collaborative ideas to influence and ehnance the direction of the visión. That is one of the reasons, as I said before, I will always say yes if he asks me to work for him. His set is a true representation of what a collaborative artform/storytelling platform should be. A definitive visión that relies on and welcomes collaborative craftmen to enhance that visión.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Rhes Low: Other than being subjected to a giant shop fan blowing in our faces in the midst of 20 degree biting cold due to the wet humid southern air and me getting massively pissed off after the 15th take because, well, I guess I’m a wimp, no.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Rhes Low: I bump into everyone, every so often.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Rhes Low: A large portion of my time is spent producing podcasts for myself and some of my clients at Red Window. Additionally, I am producing a documentary on my podcast, The Brave Dutch, based on my grandfather’s WWII experience. He was shot down over occupied Holland and spent 15 months in hiding.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Rhes Low: Yes. He is a master storyteller.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Rhes Low: I’m pretty transparent. Not too many surprises here- ummmm, oh yeah, I love Disneyworld. Great storytelling, immersion, commitment, set design, inclusión. This is a recent discovery and I am surprised to know this about myselfJ

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Rhes Low: Thanks for being fans. Share, share, share. Thad, influenced by Stephen Kings genius, has put together a lovely film that needs to be seen.

And thank you guys for creating a fórum for all of us fans to consume great info about folks who take a chance and invest their time to créate a storytelling experience that is thoughtful, engaging, and gives us the occasional escape from reality if needed and/or a window into reality if needed.

 

She is the filmmaker of Dedication Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Tyna Ezenma: My name is Tyna Ezenma, from Nigeria west Africa. I describe myself as a creative artist. My first degree was in visual arts so techinally I paint and draw, before going into photography, textile design, currently I found myself in the movie industry, specializing in directing and producing.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Tyna Ezenma: I first thought about it in 2010 after visiting Cannes when they were setting up for that year’s film festival. I finally saw the need in 2013 during a photography exhibition in ArtMonaco that I wasn’t able to completely tell my stories in still photographs.

SKSM: When did you make Dedication? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Tyna Ezenma: It was my film school project for Advanced directing class in 2017, the adaptation took me two weeks and the pre production was about a month and we shot it in 3 days. The total cost was about $4600.

SKSM: How come you picked Dedication to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Tyna Ezenma: The story actually chose, I wrote to Stephen King’s office that I wanted to adapt one of his Dollar babies, I had like two other stories but he asked me to try Dedication as nobody has ever done it. I love challenges so I took it. After reading it I was attracted to the mystery and voodoo involved in the story as it is something that I can easily relate as an African.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Tyna Ezenma: Growing up I was a huge fan of his novels, one day I just went to his website and saw that he offers his stories to students for just $1, I just abandon the script I was working on to request for his. I sent him a dollar cash.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Tyna Ezenma: I wouldn’t say there was any funny time as I was so tensed and nervous throught the production, I lived in my night wear for 3 days straight why writing it.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Tyna Ezenma: It was selected and screened in Cannes film festival in 2018, it was screened on UCLA campus, in Netherland for his fans, In New york in museum and other film festivals. Part of the contract doesn’t allow us to make profits off the project without seeking a different permission from him. To me it was a learning stage since I am into that genre of film making.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Tyna Ezenma: I got mostly good reviews in terms of acting, cinematography, directing and storytelling. The bad review will be that some people needed to watch it twice to fully understand it.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Tyna Ezenma: Yes I am one of his die hard fans, I have read most of his books but in terms of adaptation I will go with The Shinning and IT.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Tyna Ezenma: There was no personal connection apart from the emails handed by his staff but the contract was from him. Yes I sent a DVD copy to him and I think he likes it because if he doesn’t we will all have heard by now. He is very outspoken.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Tyna Ezenma: I would love to shoot the feature version of Dedication, it was a 62 page story that I had to condense to a 12 page short script. My reason will be given a enough funds and time to tell the full story will be amazing.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Tyna Ezenma: After film school I have produced and directed 2 short movies and a web series, currently in post production for my 1st and 2nd  feature films.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Tyna Ezenma: That I can read an average of 60 scripts a month and I am a big fan of Korean dramas.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Tyna Ezenma: Thank you for the honor, I will say keep your dreams alive and if you can think it you can do it.

 

He played in Constance Hilton‘s Mute Dollar Baby film as Detective.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Josh Vokey: My name is Josh Vokey and I’m an actor. I grew up in Newfoundland, Canada and I’ve lived in Toronto since I was 18.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Josh Vokey: I did a school play when I was 11 and that was it. I spent the rest of my time in school between plays/improv/choir until I was able to audition for theatre school and move to the city.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Mute Dollar Baby film?

Josh Vokey: I got involved with ‘Mute’ through Connie. She adapted Mute into a short film and also directed. The two of us worked together on Orphan Black for 4 years. She was one of the boom operators on the show and we got to know each other quite well over the years.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Josh Vokey: I think this story does an excellent job of blending the mundane with the unexpected. Three characters are having a tough day, each in their own way. They’re all trying hard to make the best of it, but quickly realize that there was nothing mundane about their days at all.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Josh Vokey: Connie offered this part to me. We’ve worked a lot together and there’s a lot of trust between us. I think that’s essential to making good film/tv.

SKSM: You worked with Constance Hilton on this film, how was that?

Josh Vokey: Working with Connie as a director was great. A+ experience. She’s collaborative and has a clear vision in her work. She gave me a lot of room to find the truth of the detective and his POV and I’m very grateful to her for that. I would work with her again in a heartbeat.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Josh Vokey: All of my scenes were shot over the course of 1 day. We had a great team and a positive vibe on the set. There weren’t so many “funny” moments as much as it was a very calm vibe. All of the scenes were about breaking through the BS of life to find something true. There was a grounded, supportive energy on the set that day that really helped myself and Cynthia find that truth.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Josh Vokey: Yes of course! I still talk with Connie and Cynthia (who played our lead and produced). Alona (our DOP) and I have worked together in the past in Newfoundland and hopefully again in the future!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Josh Vokey: These days I’ve been keeping up with reading new material and developing my own projects. COVID has had a major impact on our industry -like most – and I’ve taken a lot of time to focus on my own training and development. Work is starting to open up slowly now and I’m looking forward to being back on set and digging into bringing good material to the screen.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Josh Vokey: I am a fan of Stephen King’s work. I started off liking his dramatic works when it was a kid like The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile, and Hearts in Atlantis. But as I’ve gotten older, I’ve become more of a horror fan. I’ve always been a huge admirer of his ability to bring excellent character development to the horror genre.  He’s one of the greats and charged the whole game.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Josh Vokey: Surprising about me? Probably that I box on a regular basis. I play a lot of cerebral characters and I’m sure people would be shocked to know that I enjoy fighting for fun.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Josh Vokey: Thank you to everyone for supporting ‘Mute’ and reading this interview. We really appreciate your support and we’re happy to be a part of the world of Stephen King! It’s been a lifelong dream of mine to work on his material.

He is the filmmaker of Under the Weather Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Egor Dolgikh: My name is Egor Dolgikh. I was born and raised in Bryansk, Russia. I am 26 years old, and I am the founder and director of the movie studio Art Script Films Production.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Egor Dolgikh: That happened in my early childhood, after I saw such films as “Pulp Fiction”, “From Dusk Till Dawn” and “Gangs of New York”. I was very much impressed and obsessed by the idea of making my own movie. The first time I tried to make my short film was at the age of 17, but at that time I had no experience, and the movie was a flop.

SKSM: When did you make Under the Weather? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Egor Dolgikh: We finished producing our film “Under the Weather” in September 2019. After that we started the post-production. Montage and color-correction took three months. Then, we started the revoicing.

With our sound director Oleg Snegirev, we re-recorded half of the original sounds and the rest we took from free libraries. We were lucky to gather all the actors before the COVID pandemic.

As for preparation, it took us half a year, including scriptwriting, casting and rehearsing. The making took three months and 76 dollars that went to buy the props.

SKSM: How come you picked Under the Weather to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Egor Dolgikh: In winter 2019 my friend and scriptwriter Aleksei Firsoff offered me to screen one short story by Stephen King, called “Under the Weather”. At that time, we we not making any projects, and we found the idea rather interesting. Moreover, exactly that story could be adapted with our humble financial opportunities. However, the main point is that we very much liked the dramatic and psychological part of the story. It really suited the direction that we had chosen before.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Egor Dolgikh: Before we started making “Under the Weather”, we did not know anything about Dollar Baby. Aleksei just decided to contact the King website administration. They redirected us to Dollar Baby where there was a list of stories available for adaptation – for just a dollar. However, there was no “Under the Weather” there. So, we again contacted the administration to ask for permission. They agreed. We signed the contact and sent them a dollar. That is how we happened to know about that Baby Dollar Project.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Egor Dolgikh: While shooting in the office, one actress brought her babygirl. While we were shooting, her husband was looking after the baby. Sometimes, while being out there in the hall, the baby started crying. Maybe, that’s a sign – we were making a Dollar Baby film, and a baby was crying meanwhile 🙂

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Egor Dolgikh: We were not very much disappointed, as there are many festivals where King fans can see our short movie. I can only guess that there will be a special website under King’s auspices, on which one will be able to watch a Dollar Baby movie for a dollar that will go to ill children.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Egor Dolgikh: In general, comments were positive.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Egor Dolgikh: By now, we have sent our movie to three Russian film festivals. After finishing the subtitles, we are going to send it to foreign festivals.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Egor Dolgikh: As for me, I am not a true Stephen King fan. But I like his “Night Shift”, and “Popsy”, and the 1990 “IT” adaptation. And I also like both “Shining” 1980 adaptations.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Egor Dolgikh: Unfortunately, I did not contact King. According to the contract, we sent him a DVD copy. I have no clue if he has seen it.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Egor Dolgikh: For now, it is not on our schedule. However… time will show!

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Egor Dolgikh: Now, we are working on a full-length movie called “Uporoy”. Since autumn 2018, we have been writing and re-writing the script, collecting money – and shooting the movie! We give it much effort and time as we want to please the lovers of quality movies. “Uporoy” is a grim story inspired by little-known legends of Russian backwaters, ghoul novellas by A.K. Tolstoy and movies by David Lynch.

Here horror, art-house, surrealism, mystery and crime have mixed all together!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Egor Dolgikh: I verily appreciate your interest towards our movie. I would really like to share it with your readers, and I hope someday that will be possible. If you wanna talk about acting, or share you ideas, or take part in our future projects – just call us!

She is the filmmaker of Mute Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Constance Hilton: I am a first time director but I have been working in Toronto, Canada as a Boom Operator for about a decade. Some of my credits include Schitt’s Creek and Orphan Black.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Constance Hilton: My grandma would probably say the first time I went to Disney World and said “I want to work here when I grow up” but I seriously began considering becoming a filmmaker while in high school.

SKSM: When did you make Mute? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Constance Hilton: We shot Mute over four days in January 2019. Our budget was about 10K. Most of that went to our “process trailer” day which was all the filming for driving scenes. It involved a tow rig for our picture car along with necessary permits and escort to keep everyone safe while filming in live traffic.

SKSM: How come you picked Mute to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Constance Hilton: What I liked about the story were the questions about guilt and innocence. I also played around with the idea of who does and doesn’t have a voice and how that affects who we decide to trust.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Constance Hilton: I don’t remember when I heard about the Dollar Baby program but it was something I was certainly aware of before writing my adaptation.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Constance Hilton: Despite hiring a process trailer, we were a really small crew with minimal gear. For filming the driving shots, I could only view what we were shooting through a tiny monitor cabled to the DSLR, which meant hiding behind the front seats of the picture car, just out of shot. We also didn’t have walkie talkies for communication so Amanda Richer, who plays the deaf hitchhiker in the story, ended up slating and calling the roles in the car. She’s able to read lips so could communicate with crew outside the car.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Constance Hilton: While it would be amazing to be able to release Mute widely, I completely understand why Stephen King has put limits on these short films. Since this is my first time directing I’m pretty satisfied with having limited viewing. I love how the film turned out but I learned a lot in the process and would probably make changes if I were to make the same film again.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Constance Hilton: I don’t think we’ve had any direct reviews yet. So far reactions by people that have seen it have been positive so I guess that’s good?

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Constance Hilton: We’ve screened at two festivals, most recently the Nickel Independent Film Festival in St. John’s Newfoundland. We have a couple more festivals coming up, both in Canada and internationally, but I can’t publicly say where yet.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Constance Hilton: Misery and The Shining are probably some of my favourites. Both the novels and the adaptations.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Constance Hilton: No, although just before filming Mute I was working on In The Tall Grass, which is an adaptation of a story by Joe Hill and King, so that was a fun coincidence.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Constance Hilton: That’s a tough question. So many of his works have already been adapted, and beautifully done.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Constance Hilton: Earlier this year I was working on Far Cry 6 at the Ubisoft Toronto motion capture stage and I’m about to start working on a new tv series here in Toronto. For my own work, I’ve been writing and trying to come up with my next directing project.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Constance Hilton: Didn’t learn to drive until I was 30. Although that’s not news to my friends.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Constance Hilton: I hope that, if you get a chance to see Mute, you enjoy it.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Constance Hilton: Thank you for reaching out for this interview. It’s been a pleasure.

 

He wrote the script of Sinuhé F. Benavides’ Otto Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Can you introduce yourself to our readers?

Josh Candia: I am Josh Candia from Monterrey, Mexico. I am a Screenwriter, Writer, Director and Graphic Designer. I Studied Visual Arts with a specialty in Graphic Arts at the UANL. I have won 4 CONARTE Script Contests (2009, 2012, 2014,2016). In 2012, my first feature film script “Implacable” (“Relentless”) won a production contest organized by IMCINE and Canal 22. “Implacable” was directed by Carlos García Campillo and produced by Lesslye Yin Ramos and has been to various national and international festivals. I have written and directed two short films and four short plays, and have also written for television, the most recent for a show in development at HBO.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a screenwriter?

Josh Candia: As a teen I wrote short stories or things to amuse me, but never managed to keep up with it. While growing up I fell in love with movies and TV and one day, watching Pulp Fiction something clicked, and for the first time I paid attention and realized “SOMEONE WROTE THIS”. Since that day I became a fan of writers, specially of writers with a unique voice, that could tell a good story. It took me a while to admit I wanted to write, that I wanted a voice and to dare believe in myself. I am a late bloomer, started to write professionally when I was 30 years old, wrote a short for a screenplay contest and won. That gave me the boost I needed and slowly kept writing. Now I consider myself a professional writer, as in some one is paying me to write.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Otto Dollar Baby film?

Josh Candia: Sinhué (the director) and I knew each other, and while taking a class on directing he told me about Otto, that he had the rights and was interested in making this short, and wanted to see if I wanted to write it. I already knew about the short story, read it again and thought I had a pretty good idea where to take it, so I wrote the screenplay in very little time, we had a deadline for a contest which unfortunately we didn’t win. But Sinhué didn’t give up and he went off and produced and directed it anyway.

SKSM: How do you communicate with a director to design a screenwriter strategy for a film?

Josh Candia: We talk and talk and talk. Mainly about what is it that interests them in this particular story, see if they have an “in”. I try to write to the strengths of the directors, what I think would work best visually. Since this was a short story, and we had a tight deadline I wrote the first draft telling the story the way I thought worked best in a visual medium, focusing on the themes that I read in the story, trying to stay true to its spirit.

SKSM: You worked in a Dollar Baby based on a Stephen King short story. It was your most challenging film?

Josh Candia: Not really. I mean, it was challenging finding a low budget way to adapt it, staying true to it. But it’s such a good, clear story with a strong voice, so that made it fun.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Josh Candia: I think its themes are super relatable. It has this aura of revenge and guilt in such a Stephen King way that makes it so attractive.

SKSM: Can you tell us about the filming steps? Funny things that happened so far (Bloopers, etc).

Josh Candia: I wasn’t there while they were filming, such is a writer’s life. We rarely are invited. Ha, ha, ha.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Josh Candia: I finished work at a tv show for HBO that hopefully will be produced once this pandemic is done with. I am also currently working on two screenplays, and developing movies and tv shows as part of a writers collective called Co-Lab Historias para Llevar. We are 8 members, mostly writers, and we also have a podcast called “Guionistas sin Guion” on Spotify, apple, etc, where we talk about, what else, screenwriting.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Josh Candia: Big fan. I love his work. I have to confess that I haven’t read ALL of his books, the man is an unstoppable writing monster. He’s also a big inspiration, his book “On Writing” is one of my favorites on the subject, and I recommend it so much. Other than that, I love his short stories the most, specially the ones in Different Seasons. Of his novels I love The Stand and Carrie.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Josh Candia: I dunno, I think I am a pretty open person. Anyone that reads my twitter know what I think and what I love. Hmm, maybe they’ll be surprised if they knew that even though I work as a writer, and have dreamt of being a writer, I REALLY hate writing, I mean, I love it but I also hate it. It’s so HARD! (If you wanna be good)

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Something you’d like to tell our readers?

Josh Candia: That if they speak spanish, they can find me @JoshCandiaT on Twitter, or on my website joshcandia.com and long live the King! Stephen, I mean.

She is the filmmaker of The Deathroom Dollar Baby film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Amy Driver: My name is Amy Driver, I studied film & television production in Dublin and currently I live in Wellington, New Zealand. I’m a freelance video producer, editor and social media manager.

SKSM: When did you make The Deathroom? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Amy Driver: We made The Deathroom back in 2013, in our final year of film school. It was shot on a micro budget, raised through fundraising, bake sales and raffles.

SKSM: How come you picked In the deathroom to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Amy Driver: My producer, Leeona Duff, came to me with the script. I thought she was crazy trying to make a film just a few months before our grad films were due to start filming but I love a bit of crazy so I jumped at the chance.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Amy Driver: I had made a Dollar Baby before, Willa, in 2012. I came across the Dollar Baby idea because I was struggling to write a script and found myself wishing I could afford to adapt a story that was already written. A quick google search, led me to discover Willa.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Amy Driver: We filmed The Death Room in the dark, in the countryside. It was freezing, we were running 4 generators to keep the lights and heat going, and at various times they all blew. For the last scene, I had to transport cast and crew across to a different location, I was new to driving and a little nervous doing so in the pitch black on unfamiliar country roads. My car was making the most awful noise and just generally being difficult to manage. When we got to the second location, I realised I’d just gone the whole way with the hand brake still on.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Amy Driver: It would be great if there could be internet release for the Dollar Babies, these days social media is a great free advertising tool for film makers and Dollar Baby filmmakers could really utilise that.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Amy Driver: I really enjoyed the recent series, The Outsider but as a film student I think my favourite Stephen King adaptation has to be Shawshank Redemption, of course.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Amy Driver: No, I never had direct contact with King for either of the films.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Amy Driver: Thanks for reading!

He played in Dave Brock’s Dollar Baby The Woman In The Room as Kevin Vance.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

David Gravely: My name is David Gravely. I serve Chinese food, make music, and film.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

David Gravely: I don’t necessarily want to be an actor.

SKSM: How did you become involved in The Woman in the Room Dollar Baby film?

David Gravely: I heard of it from someone, so I checked it out.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

David Gravely: It seems relatable to anyone who has cared for the sick. Also, it’s Stephen King so that helps.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

David Gravely: I auditioned.

SKSM: You worked with Dave Brock on this film, how was that?

David Gravely: Dave is a great guy. I would work with him again. As nice as they get.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

David Gravely: No moment in particular. It had a very familial feeling on set. I was coming to the project from outside of the college, so it was cool to witness that closeness from a different vantage point.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

David Gravely: Dave and I have spoke from time to time online.

Damian Ross was the sound man in residence. Him and I had PA’d together on Tijah Bumgarner’s film Meadow Bridge. I liked Damian a lot, so my film partner Shane Pierce and I hired him to be our sound man on our feature film (It’s Gonna Be A Punk Rock Summer).

It was valuable to meet Damian. He’s a hell of a guy. Good sense of humor and skilled to the max.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

David Gravely: Short Films for mine and Shane’s company called Butter Chicken Pictures.

Also, we had written, casted, and scouted another feature film. We were in fundraiser mode and getting close to shooting the thing when the Covid 19 shutdown happened. Sadly, it put that project on a delay. It’s still in the works though.

Also my band Heavy-Set Paw-Paws have been hard at work recording the last several months, putting new material into the world. Check em out!!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

David Gravely: Yes definitely. I’ve read probably 25 or so of his works.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

David Gravely: I have no idea. Haha

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

David Gravely: Keep meeting people locally and asking them to share their work. Whether it’s wood- working, stories of being a car mechanic, piano recordings, paintings, etc. Old friends too. Look em up and say hey… Send me something you’re working on.

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