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She played in Polly Schattel’s Dollar Baby Here There Be Tygers as Ms. Trask.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Marisa Blake: My name is Marisa Blake. I am an actor and voiceover artist. I spend most of my days working in my booth working on audiobooks, commercials, e-learning videos and more! When I get lucky, I get to work on set for films, TV series and commercials. I love my job!

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Marisa Blake: I always liked being part of school and church plays when I was younger. When I was a teenager my brothers and I got “Scouted” by an agency where we did some commercial work and I first started doing voiceover. After years of rejection (As goes in this industry) I decided it was not for me. About 6 years ago I helped one of my employers create some video content and re-found my love for working in front of the camera. I signed up for Acting Classes, then found an agent, and here we are!

SKSM: How did you become involved in Here There Be Tygers Dollar Baby film?

Marisa Blake: I am lucky enough to be friends with the insanely talented Jennifer Trudrung! We took classes together and have worked on several projects together. I feel incredibly lucky to get to work with her in any capacity.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Marisa Blake: I think this story leaves something to the imagination. I also think that looking into earlier works by people who have seriously excelled in their careers as Stephen King has, are intriguing.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Marisa Blake: If I recall correctly, she just “saw me” in the role. I use to teach children and I play guitar, so I think it made sense.

SKSM: You worked with Polly Schattel on this film, how was that?

Marisa Blake: Polly is incredible! Just like Jennifer, she has a vision and she knows how to execute it to get the shots that she wants. Also, being able to work with and direct kids is not always an easy task. We did however, have some talented young actors working on this film. She had a great crew she was working with and I think Polly was able to tie in all the elements to create what I consider a beautiful work of art.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Marisa Blake: Well, for me, it was that my youngest son is in the scene with me. Getting to work with him by my side is pretty cool! (He is in the bottom right hand corner blowing bubbles in the scene where I am playing guitar with my students)

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Marisa Blake: Yes! Almost Everyone. Asheville has a beautiful acting community. There are a lot of us here that know each other and often work together on various projects. I feel incredibly lucky to be a part of it all.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Marisa Blake: Auditions, Auditions, Auditions! 🙂 I am not working on a specific project at this moment, but this past year had some incredible opportunities. I was able to work on set for the DC Comics series Swamp Thing with actors Will Patton and Kevin Durand. That was a big moment for me. I narrated a handful of audiobooks this past year. One series that was a blast was the Lola Cruz Mystery Series! And my voice is in the Smithsonian Natural History Museum in Washington DC with their new Deep Time exhibit that opened in June of 2019. It’s been a great year and I look forward to more!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Marisa Blake: Stephen King, scares the crap out of me. 🙂 I am a fan in the sense that I appreciate an artist who can bring characters to life, convey emotions and feelings through his writing, and can do so as often a he does! But in general, I am not a fan of “scary”. Yes, I am and adult who is still afraid of the dark….

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Marisa Blake: With social media it is hard to be “surprised” anymore. But I think that people who do know me are surprised that I am Latina and that I speak Spanish. And since you are writing from Spain, I can also share that I grew up dancing Flamenco. My grandparents on my Dad’s side were from Alicante, and my mother’s mother was from Madrid. My mothers father is from Puerto Rico, and so is she. My father was born in Cuba. I am very proud of my Hispanic/Latin Heritage!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Marisa Blake: If you are still reading this, THANKS!  If you want to learn more about me or follow my work, you can check out my website: www.MarisaBlake.com or follow me on Instagram or Twitter @MarisaBlakeActs

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Marisa Blake: Thanks so much for reaching out Oscar!

 

He played in Brian Johnson‘s Dollar Baby Uncle Otto’s Truck as George McCutcheon.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Rick Meyer: My name is Rick Meyer. I was born in Williamsport, Indiana, but spent most of  my life in New York City where I went to school, and worked for decades. I did almost all possible jobs in show business, more in theatre but many in film and TV as well.  For  the last ten years of my working life I was a sound engineer on BroadwayBroadway shows. I was lucky enough to be able to retire early which allowed me to pursue the most rewarding part of my life when I had time to spend with my son as he grew up. I loved coaching his Little League team, keeping time for many of his hockey games, and coaching his golf team in high school.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Rick Meyer: My parents were both actor/directors so I was immersed in the business from early childhood. Mrs. McThing was the first profesional production I performed in when I was three. So rather than wanting to become an actor, it was my reality from day one. In theatrical jargón, I was “born in the trunk.”

SKSM: How did you become involved in Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby film?

Rick Meyer: Brian Johnson and I have worked together on each others’ films for several years now. Lately I have been doing more acting jobs and Brian was familiar enough with my work to cast me as George McCutcheon.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Rick Meyer: Uncle Otto’s Truck is a terrific ghost story that explores how Otto’s guilt about killing George eats away at him, eventually driving him to madness. Quentin’s entire life has been affected by his knowledge of the murder and George’s ghost haunts him which brings extra Depth to the story.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Rick Meyer: Brian did ask me to audition to verify his opinión that I could give George the energy he was looking for. I have no idea if anyone else read for the part.

SKSM: You worked with Brian Johnson on this film, how was that?

Rick Meyer: It is always a pleasure to work with true profesionals. And Brian is a true filmmaker and a Good friend. He has been a terrific DP/editor on three of my films, and he is a wonderful director to act for.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Rick Meyer: There were many exciting moments as the shoot came together and we found ways to illuminate the story, getting effects that we all knew would be eerie and exciting. The funniest momento actually came away from the set. I was wearing overalls that I could not get out of without help and my fase was covered with blood. There was no way to wash at the location, so I drove back to my room like that. When I got to the hotel my electronic key wouldn’t work so I had to go to the front desk. The girl who was on duty tried not to be freaked by the blood, but when I asked her to help get the overalls off my shoulders she eventually helped, but the look on her fase was priceless.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Rick Meyer: I have contact with Brian on a regular basis, I also am in contact with Joan Reilly, both of whom work on my films too. I have had a conversatin Rose Warshana and will certainly be in contact with Peter Holland and others. Film making is a team sport, and when you meet excellent professionals, you want to work with them again.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Rick Meyer: My writing partner Julianne Wargren and I are always suggesting story ideas to each other and when we find ones we both like we write them. She and I wrote and produced a short which Brian shot and edited, in which Joan and I acted that is being submitted to festivals.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Rick Meyer: I have always enjoyed his work. Some of my favorites are: The Stand, Carrie, Firestarter, It, ‘Salem’s Lot, and Christine.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Rick Meyer: That I was a New York City cabdriver for a couple of years.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Rick Meyer: I hope our film scares and delights you.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Rick Meyer: I want to thank Mr. King for allowing so many filmmakers to utilize his wonderful IP.

 

He played in Ben Woods‘ Rest Stop as Wife Beater.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Ben Taylor: I’m Ben Taylor. I live in Melbourne. I work as an actor and also have a part time job working in a treatment facility for prisoners and youth. I enjoy in my spare time surfing and spending time at football and with friends.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Ben Taylor: It was when I saw a TV show being filmed at the Sunshine Coast and there was a host who asked us to be in the background and I was as fascinated by the cameras and the joy of people at their job. I also loved watched Leonardo DiCaprio movies and wanted to know how they create the characters and speak the dialogue.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Rest Stop Dollar Baby film?

Ben Taylor: Through an audition with Ben at his University. It was a student film and we auditioned for the character and it was a dark and fearsome type role which are the ones I am drawn to.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Ben Taylor: The suspense and drama that is created when all the characters worlds collide. The tension that is built during the verbal argument which leads to the major altercation would be a situation that a viewer would have thoughts about what would I do? How would I react.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Ben Taylor: Yes. Auditioned.

SKSM: You worked with Ben Woods on this film, how was that?

Ben Taylor: He was a great director who allowed the actors push the scene in different  directions and got various emotions out so he had a lot to choose from in the edit room.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Ben Taylor: Just that when the scene was happening in the toilet there was a passer by who looked quite concerned until they noticed there was also a film crew.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Ben Taylor: I still see some of the crew and cast at various events and film screening but I moved to Melbourne and most of the crew and cast live in QLD.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Ben Taylor: I just worked on a small scene in Preacher.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Ben Taylor: Yes. He has written some wonderful. Books that have been made into movies and will continue to have his books made into movies.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Ben Taylor: I like to collect kurbside rubbish and decorate my house. I will also sell it to turn a profit if I find something I really like.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Ben Taylor:

 

He played in Brian Johnson‘s Dollar Baby Uncle Otto’s Truck as Older Quentin.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jim France: Quite simply, I am a professional stage, movie, television, commercial and voiceover actor. I am a Scotsman but have an English accent. Scottish accent can be used however!!!!! I am also a US citizen since 1974.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Jim France: I’ve always wanted to be an actor and participated at school as much as I could including having my own 6-piece New Orleans style jazz band in which I played trumpet. I was fortunate to graduate at the age of 16  but had to wait 2 years to go to Cambridge University to study for a degree in Ancient and Modern Languages – French, German, Latin and Ancient Greek.

During those two years, I worked at the local theatre. We did everything at one time or another – scenery, props, lighting, ASM-ing (Assistant Stage Management), acting, prompting (this is where one would sit in the wings with the script to “Prompt’ actors when they forgot their lines.) We did 40 plays or musicals a year. We rehearsed in the daytime, the show we would do the following week and perform the show at night we had rehearsed the previous week.

At the theatre, I had begun to notice that not many people spoke Latin or Ancient Greek any more!!!!! I had grown to really love it and wanted to go to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London to become an actor… but was forbidden to do so by my Father as Fathers in the 50s could!

So I went in to his industry – the hotel industry and graduated from L’Ecôle Hôtelière de la Société Suisse des Hôteliers (The Swiss Hotel School in 1961). I remained in the Hotel industry in the UK until 1965 working at the Dorchester Hotel and then the London Hilton. In 1965, I emigrated to the United States.

As a result of the my various studies, work etc., I have lived in Scotland, England, France, Germany, Switzerland, Norway, Canada, The United States and Puerto Rico.

I ended my hotel career in 1999 as CEO of a small hotel company but (after a decade with the company) ran afoul of my Chairman of the Board and was fired. We settled out of court and I became a consultant — which I hated. Then I worked for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for four hurricane seasons helping those whose homes had been damaged. But wasn’t happy there either.

One day, my wife came to me and said: “Jim, you are about the most miserable son-of-a-bitch I’ve ever met! Why don’t you go and do what you’ve always wanted to do?”

So… in 2003, I went back to school for three years (privately because I wanted to stay out of the school population) studying acting, singing and dancing. I did a lot of amateur theatre and a couple of amateur movies. And in 2006, I went for my first professional audition – got the gig – and have been working ever since.

In those days, I did a lot of musical comedy with fabulous roles – Scrooge in “A Christmas Carol” both musical and play – 7 times. Fagin in “Oliver”  and many others.

But in 2015, I found that doing 8 performances a week was beginning to become somewhat arduous so I have cut the theatre back to plays only (no musicals) that do only four performances a week. And now I concentrate basically on movies, TV and commercials along with voiceovers.

I am a happy man.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Uncle Ottos Truck Dollar Baby film?

Jim France: Brian Johnson found me on Stage 32 and contacted me. We had lunch and Brian asked me if I’d like to work on the project. The rest – as they say – is history.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Jim France: Firstly, it’s a Stephen King short story. Secondly, it is a “horror” story which hits one in the gut. I saw, at a preview, another horror film a few weeks ago which was all visual horror with scary horrific faces and such. It was lousy.  This story has an underlying scariness through dialogue which is accented visually. That is much more scary to my way of thinking.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Jim France: I didn’t have an audition since Brian had looked up my previous work. And for sure it was not written especially for me. I am not an A-List actor.

SKSM: You worked with Brian Johnson on this film, how was that?

Jim France: He is tremendous! I’ve worked with many Directors but what I liked about his approach was his patience and understanding. He also allowed me to make suggestions as to additional things which might be done or movements made. Really easy to work with and really knows his stuff.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jim France: When we went down to the pier to film a couple of scenes, I met the “Shrimp Boat” owners. One told me the story of how his family came to the US from Estonia. A harrowing story of oppression and fear of death but eventual escape. Most interesting!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Jim France: Haven’t had follow-up contact with the crew or actors with the exception of Brian. But I’m sure some of us will meet again. They also knew their stuff.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Jim France: I shall start work on a period piece in Richmond VA at the beginning of October. The role is small but is of Luther Martin, one of the United States’ Founding Fathers, whose actions helped the passage of the Bill of Rights. And who also defended and achieved acquittal for the Fourth Chief Justice of the United States Samuel Chase in his impeachment trial in 1805.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jim France: Absolutely! Children of the Corn; Firestarter; The Shining (the 1980 movie); Carrie (1976); Christine; The Green Mile; The Shawshank Redemption.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jim France: I am a descendent (albeit probably illegitimately) of Bonnie Prince Charlie (Prince Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart) 1720-1788 known as “The Young Pretender,” claimant to the throne of Scotland. Defeated by the English in the 1745 Jacobite Rebellion at the battle of Culloden in 1746.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jim France: “Uncle Otto’s Truck” is a terrific story and wonderful film. Who knows what the future may hold for Brian Johnson and his work. Break a leg!!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Jim France: Thank you for taking the time to read this.

 

He played in Brian Johnson‘s Dollar Baby Uncle Otto’s Truck as Uncle Otto.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Peter Holland: I’m an actor and a playwright and a theatre director. My wife, Christina, and I own an educational theatre company called Once Upon a Blue Ridge.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Peter Holland: When I was 14 and performed in my first play- H.M.S. Pinafore, a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Uncle Otto’s Truck Dollar Baby film?

Peter Holland: Last summer I was introduced to Brian Johnson, the film’s writer/director, by a former student of mine. She thought I would be good for the part and recommended me to Brian.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Peter Holland: Madness. We’re troubled and at the same time fascinated by characters who are mad. What happened to make them mad? Because we spend so much time in cars and trucks and tend to give our vehicles personalities, the idea of a haunted or possessed truck is appealing. And, of course, the magic of King’s writing makes the story seem plausable and universal.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Peter Holland: Yes. I had to read several times for Brian and even memorized a scene which he filmed.

SKSM: You worked with Brian Johnson on this film, how was that?

Peter Holland: Brian is a very talented cinematographer, writer, and director. I appreciated the creative freedom that he gave me to fully explore the character. We had a great rapport on the set.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Peter Holland: There were several. One that stands out to me was when we were filming the climatic scenes of Otto and the truck. I had the big idea to cling to the hood of the truck as the stunt driver drove the truck in circles around these huge brush fires that we had set in a large field. After numerous takes from different angles with the Red camera, Brian got his drone camera out, and I had to do numerous takes riding on the hood with that camera. Finally, after many laps of the burning field, I yelled to the stunt driver: “That’s enough! Stop this damn thing!” He had a walkie talkie in the cab of the truck to communicate with Brian. After talking with Brian, the stunt driver- a talented young man named Chris Tenney- says: “ Brian says it looks so good he wants another lap!” I thought that was pretty funny- once the truck finally stopped and I was on the ground.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Peter Holland: They were all people I hadn’t worked with before. Most of us are Facebook friends now.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Peter Holland: I have a national tv spot that I’m doing for the Alzheimer’s Foundation this coming Wednesday. It’s about a man and his grandson and the memories they share. I’m also finishing some post production work on a short film I made last December called As I Was. The hardest thing I’m doing now is helping my wife direct three casts of my Peter Pan stage play at the high school where she teaches theatre- South Stokes High School in North Carolina. I’ve always enjoyed directing young people, but they do take a lot of energy and understanding.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Peter Holland: Well, of course I’m a fan. He’s our time’s Edgar Allen Poe. Uncle Otto’s Truck reminds me a little of Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart. Guilt is the trigger for the madness of the characters in both stories.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Peter Holland: That I like American football- Carolina Panthers are my team! Unfortunately, we haven’t won a game yet this year (big sigh).

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Peter Holland: I hope the fans of Stephen King’s work will see this film versión of Uncle Otto’s Truck. I thought Otto was a great part- up there with King Lear, Ahab from Moby Dick, Scrooge from A Christmas Carol, or Walter White from Breaking Bad. We looked for creative ways to show the extent of Otto’s madness. Hopefully, these moments will prove to be entertaining and insightful.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Peter Holland: Just that I’m grateful to Brian Johnson for the opportunity and the faith he had in me and that I thoroughly enjoyed working with all the cast and crew of Uncle Otto’s Truck.

 

He played in Jon Mann‘s Dollar Baby Popsy as Sheridan.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Robert Ramsay: My name is Rob Ramsay. I’m an actor/writer/producer from New Brunswick currently living in Toronto. I’m also a co-producer and the star of Popsy.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actor?

Robert Ramsay: I started doing local theatre at a young age and fell in love with acting. I remember being in a production of Jesus Christ Superstar and thinking ‘I want to do this for the rest of my life. I followed that passion to university, where I studied acting and met my writing/producing partner, Jon Mann.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Popsy Dollar Baby film?

Robert Ramsay: Jon and I have worked together for almost a decade, writing and making our own projects. Jon has been a Stephen King-aholic since I met him, and the story of Popsy has been a favourite of his for a long time. When he got the rights to Popsy, I was more than happy to help him produce it and star in it.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Robert Ramsay: Firstly, I think the name Stephen King attracts people to it. His style, tone and reputation are second to none, when it comes to horror. Secondly, I think people like to see what someone will do when they’re pinned in a corner – when their animal instincts come out. Popsy is a story about two people being pushed to their limits – who feel like they have no other choice but to do what they’re doing. That tension and drama is always fun to watch.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Robert Ramsay: Jon and I talked for a long time about who was the right actor to play this role. Ultimately, I had the privilege of stepping in. I think because Jon and I have worked together for so long, he trusted me to do the part justice.

SKSM: You worked with Jon Mann on this film, how was that?

Robert Ramsay: Fantastic. Jon and I have made several short films, written several pilots and have been close friends for many years. We have a short hand and trust that only comes with time. He is an extremely talented film maker and anytime we get to make something together, it’s a treat.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Robert Ramsay: We had a lot of fun on set. When you’re making something as dark and heavy as this, you need to keep things light, so we had a lot of laughs.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Robert Ramsay: Ya, Jon and I talk almost every day. I still talk with some of the crew members and I’m keeping an eye on the career of my extremely talented co-star, Avery Winters-Anthony. I think he’s about to take off.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Robert Ramsay: I was fortunate enough to have a small part in IT: Chapter 2, which was another Stephen King project, I’ll be reprising a role I did on the first season Anne of Green Gables and Jon and I are busy writing our next project.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Robert Ramsay: Of course. He’s a legend. I love his characters and the out-of-this-world complexity he can write with, while telling a simple and relatable story.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Robert Ramsay: I get scared easily, so I really don’t like scary movies. I’ve seen this film and I think it’s fantastic, but once was enough for me.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Robert Ramsay: Thanks for watching and taking interest in Jon and I’s careers. We hope to keep making movies you’ll enjoy for many years to come.

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Robert Ramsay: Nope. Thanks!

 

He is the man behind That Feeling You Can Only Say What It Is In French Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Nathan Gathergood: At the time of making That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is In French, back in July 2010, I was working for ITV Meridian, on their news output. I am still in news, but now working for the BBC.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Nathan Gathergood: Working in news can be quite repetitive and also, depending on the news cycle, can be mentally draining. Although I’d love to be a filmmaker, sadly I am still in news. This short was more about escaping the drudgery and doing something creative and fantastical.

SKSM: When did you make That Feeling You Can Only Say What It Is In French? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Nathan Gathergood: If memory serves me well, we shot it in a few days, over the space of a couple of weeks in the summer of 2010. I think we only had four locations, the airfield, the plane interior, the car interior and the house interior. I bought a DSLR (that has been gathering dust ever since), hired a jib, got us all to the Isle of Wight (for the airfield scene) and bribed everyone with lunch. I think it cost less than £1000 to make, with the camera being the bulk of that sum. I think I had to pay a nominal amount to a college to use their mock plane interior. They had a course for cabin crew and the interior suited our needs (although in the wide shots you can sometimes see that there is a back wall!).

SKSM: How come you picked That Feeling You Can Only Say What It Is In French to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Nathan Gathergood: I liked that no-one else had done it at that point. I see from your excellent website that someone else has now attempted it and would be very interested to see where they took it and the choices they made. It felt like a good length on the page, but also manageable -there weren’t many characters. But most importantly, for me at that time, it felt like a challenge. I’m not sure if I rose to that challenge technically, due to the amount of car interior blue screen shots, for example, but I knew I wanted to stretch myself. Finally, the plot is a great one. I love time loop movies. I did my dissertation on 12 Monkeys and like how a subtle change within a loop, a word, a gesture can completely alter your perception of something you thought that the plot had already told you.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Nathan Gathergood: I’d seen or read about it somewhere. I wanted to make a short, but getting a decent script is hard and writing one is even harder. Adapting one, on the other hand seemed like a sensible choice, so I think I was just searching for a short story to adapt and stumbled on the Dollar Deal. Luckily I had recently been to the US and had a spare dollar I could send to Margaret Morehouse, Stephen’s Assistant.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Nathan Gathergood: When we were filming the plane interiors, we only had a few hours in which to do it, before the next class needed the “set”. It was a Saturday, so goodness knows why they had to be in then -the rest of the college was deserted! So much so, that when a fire alarm test went wrong and the alarm didn’t go off, I was chasing around the site, trying to find one of the security guards for ages. It felt like some kind of very loud nightmare!

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Nathan Gathergood: I can totally see the logic behind it and I knew the Deal before I made the film, but it’s very frustrating. It’s a shame that there’s not a resource on Stephen’s website where people could pay a tiny fee to see them (all the time they were not commercially optioned).

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Nathan Gathergood: I had it online very briefly, so that friends and family around the world could see it and later saw on a forum that someone else had seen it, wanted to see it again, but couldn’t find it -she had very vivid memories of it though! It won a bronze award at the Vegas Independent Film Festival and a silver at the Isle of Wight Film Festival, so I take those as complimentary reviews.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Nathan Gathergood: I got it onto the roster of a few festivals after getting it made. It debuted at Cannes, in their Short Film Corner, but other than the VIFF!, the IOWFF and one or two Dollar Babies festivals, I forget where else it showed up.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Nathan Gathergood: Yes, I’m a big fan and have tried to watch as many adaptations as I can, from big hitter, like The Shining, to lesser known adaptations such as the Nightmares and Dreamscapes TV mini-series.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Nathan Gathergood: Only his signature on my copy of the Dollar Deal contract! I’d be surprised if he had seen it -he must be a very busy man…

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Nathan Gathergood: I would want to shoot a series of movies based on The Dark Tower books (but then, who wouldn’t?). I must have read the series through at least four times and the most recent couple of read throughs were actually listen throughs (I had the audiobooks on in my car), so I was freer to let my mind drift and I was constantly thinking how I would film each scene and editing the narrative as I listened. Those books were very important to me and I felt that the film was a real let down.  As a standalone movie, it might be great, but I couldn’t get past the disappointment, that it was nothing like the books I had read (or listened to) nor the pictures I had in my head.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Nathan Gathergood: I’ve got a podcast out there, but more importantly, I’m trying to get a musical film off the ground -watch this space…

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Nathan Gathergood: I haven’t vomited since August 2000. I’ve never been to a barbers (although looking at my hair, that probably won’t be a surprise!).

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Nathan Gathergood: If they’re reading this, they must have an interest in Stephen King and Dollar Babies, so I would say -if you haven’t made a Dollar Baby, get out there and do it! Things are so much easier now -you can film and edit something to a very high standard on a mobile phone, so get out there and get involved. You can do it!!

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Nathan Gathergood: Thank you very much for having me Oscar and thank you for your website -it is a fantastic resource.

 

He is the man behind Rainy Season Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Patrick Haischberger: Hello, my name is Patrick Haischberger, I am a director from Austria and make the short film Rainy Season. This is a short story by Stephen King.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a filmmaker?

Patrick Haischberger: I knew that very early, to be honest. My mother ran a video store when I was a kid. That’s when my love for the movie started.

SKSM: When did you make Rainy Season? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Patrick Haischberger: I shot Rainy Season in May this year. We wanted to produce a movie with Hollywood style. All of this with low budget. The shooting took 5 days.

SKSM: How come you picked Rainy Season to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Patrick Haischberger: I love the story because it is also possible to be played in Austria. A small village where there is a secret kept. Rituals, only the inhabitants understand. That’s what I focused on writing the script the most. And the characters from Kings story feel very well in Austria.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Patrick Haischberger: A friend of mine is a film composer in Hollywood and he got in touch with Stephen King’s office. He knows that I am a big Stephen King fan and I should just cheeky if he would be willing to produce a short film in Austria. I wrote to the office and that’s how we got together.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Patrick Haischberger: Yes, there was a moment when my heart stopped for a second. The main actor Thomas Stipsits should stop in a scene barefoot just before a pile of broken glass. But he didn’t stop early enough and stepped directly into the glass shrads. Thank God nothing happened to him. But it was worth it, the recording is really great.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Patrick Haischberger: It’s of course a bad feeling that fans of Stephen King can not see the movie, but hopefully they can see the movie on film festivales.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Patrick Haischberger: Those who saw the movie were totally excited. There were only positive reviews so far. Thank God.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Patrick Haischberger: Of course, the movie will run as many film festivals worldwide as possible.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Patrick Haischberger: I’m a giant Stephen King fan. I own all his books. My favorite work is “The Stand”. I made this movie as a fan for the fans.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Patrick Haischberger: Yes, I had personal contact with Stephen King. But he will not see the movie until we have finished with the English subtitles. This will happen in a view days.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Patrick Haischberger: Of course I would like to shoot a Stephen King movie. Salem’s Lot would be my favorite.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Patrick Haischberger: I am currently working on an Austrian drama. This will also be a short film. And I’m writing my first novel. Of course a horror novel.

SKSM: What one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Patrick Haischberger: I’m afraid of spiders. I do not like them and I think they do not like me either. Laughs.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Patrick Haischberger: Read more scary books.

SKSM: Would you like to add anything else?

Patrick Haischberger: I would be happy if you watch the Rainy Season Trailer on YouTube and tell me on Facebook or Instagram your feedback. I would be glad to answer your questions. Thank you and maybe we will meet at a festival somedays.

 

She played in Hendrik Harms’ Dollar Baby All That You Love Will Be Carried Away as Zoe.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a little bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Gabriella Leonardi: Helloooo. I’m Gabriella Leonardi and I play ‘Zoe’ in Harms Way Production‘s ‘All That You Love Will Be Carried Away’! I live in a small town called Hastings and I am the eldest of four siblings. I am a method actress and mental health advocate. When I am not acting I am working in the worlds cutest coffee shop in Hastings.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become an actress?

Gabriella Leonardi: Ever since I was 5 and played a snowflake in my school nativity. I kept running across the stage when it wasn’t my turn. My mum loves to tell that story! No, I can’t remember to be honest, I just know I’ve always wanted too. I’ve always had this desire to play characters that people connect too. I have always wanted to be in psychological thrillers or social realism films because they show the harsh reality of humanity.

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby film?

Gabriella Leonardi: I found the casting via instagram as had followed Harms Way Productions for a while. As soon as I saw the character castings and I saw it was based on a Stephen King book, I sent in a selftape straight away! I am very grateful to Hendrik for casting me and trusting me to take on the amazing role of ‘Zoe’.

SKSM: What do you think it is about the story that attracts people so much?

Gabriella Leonardi: It is heavily based around mental health, which everyone can relate to in some way. It definitely plays on the audiences mind, especially Hendrik’s adaption as the very carefully thought out and clever characters he has added.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Gabriella Leonardi: I did have to audition for the part but it was bizarre because when I was doing my character development once I got role, I was really shocked because I realised it was one of my dream roles. She is so raw and misunderstood and so many people can connect to her and I absolutely loved playing her. Proper gritty!

SKSM: You worked with Hendrik Harms on this film, how was that?

Gabriella Leonardi: It was incredible. Hendrik is not only a good director but a very good writer and the adaptation he created is extremely smart. He made everyone feel so welcome and the whole team as a whole were incredible.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Gabriella Leonardi: The table read when we all read the script and ate pizza! It was the most welcoming group of people ever. Then add the part I nearly passed out.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Gabriella Lonardi: I am in contact with all of them, crew and cast. We have all met up recently in London and are always planning other meet ups. They are absolutely wonderful and all from such different backgrounds. We’ve become a little film family and I would love the opportunity to work with them all again! Here’s hoping….

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Gabriella Leonardi: I have just wrapped on a campaign video for a charity that supports young homeless people, which was an incredible experience and I was honoured to be chosen to portray a real person and tell her story. She is an incredibly strong young lady and the charity is incredible.

I am also filming for “Roadgirl” a feature film about female gangs in London, in which I play Estelle, the gang leader. – A very important true story thats needed to be told.

I am also in preproduction of feature film “Beautiful Monster” – a biopsy of Mary Shelley that starts filming in 2020. I am currently in the research stage and I’m lucky enough to be cast as Shelley herself so very busy researching and learning to horse ride…

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Gabriella Leonardi: A massive fan. I think he’s incredible and shows the dark truth about life and this is love. Stephen King and Tim Burton are my ultimate faves…. I love the dark stuff! I am very excited for IT 2 to come out!!

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Gabriella Leonardi: I am half Italian! People don’t think it because I’m unbelievably pale but I’d like to think my name gives it away a little…

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Gabriella Leonardi: Thank you for supporting us and all the other film makers and creatives that take on the “Dollar baby”. It is fascinating watching and reading about other people experiences and I hope you watch Harmsway Studios adaptation of “All that you love will be carried away”. I hope you like it!

SKSM: Do you like to add anything else?

Gabriella Leonardi: If you are an aspiring creative, don’t give up on your dream. Even when it gets hard and you have no money and think to give it up and get a well paid regular job… keep going because all it takes is one job or opportunity to give you a boost to carry on 🙂

He is the Producer in Paul Mortsolf‘s Rest Stop Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: May you introduce yourself to our readers?

Joe McParland: My name is Joe McParland. I’m the producer of “Rest Stop”, based on a short story by Stephen King and a founding partner of Seven Faces Films, our production company, located in Inland Empire of California.

SKSM: When did you know you wanted to become a producer?

Joe McParland: The role of producer, came about wanting to make sure that I was able, along with my co-producer Christopher Shaw… to bring our director Paul Mortsolf’s vision to life. I believe in Paul’s work and talents.

SKSM: How did you become involved in ‘Rest Stop‘ Dollar Baby film?

Joe McParland: Paul Mortsolf, myself and few other friends had known each other for quite some time. We would always talk about the love of film and how we’d love to make movies. We’ll quite a few years had passed, and one day Paul came to me and asked if I’d be interested in making “Rest Stop”, he had explained how the rights were purchased via Stephen Kings people. I was blown away and had never had thought it’d be possible, for a couple of guys who worked at GameStop.

SKSM: Can you tell us about your work in the film?

Joe McParland: Other than my role as producer, I was also Assistant Director. Paul and I had a wonderful time, working with our Director of Photography Anthony Bernard. This was new territory for both Paul and I, we had a great experienced crew and cast to guide us.

SKSM: What was it like to work with Paul Mortsolf on this film?

Joe McParland: Working with Paul, is like being married to a person… who loves film, loves the genre and respects the process. From the time he asked me to be a part of “Rest Stop”, the numerous pre-production meetings to putting the film in the can… it’s been a great collaboration and friendship.

SKSM: Was there any funny things that happened while filming (Bloopers, etc)?

Joe McParland: This film had lots of fun moments, the main thought that stands out… was the rehearsal between Lane Wray (Rick Harden) and Justin Phillip (Lee) during the encounter scenes. We were working in 31 degree weather, in the evening, at the “Rest Stop” location.  If humor was firewood, those two kept us warm.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Joe McParland: Absolutely! My favorite Stephen King based film as a kid, was “Creepshow” directed by the late great George A. Romero. My favorite novel of Mr. King is “The Stand”. I read the complete uncut version in my 8th grade year of junior high. The book was so epic, I kept a journal of character names and events to reference back to.

SKSM: What are you working on nowadays?

Joe McParland: Since “Rest Stop”, Paul Mortsolf, myself and Seven Faces Films shot a music video, a commercial and web based content. Paul is currently writing a original feature length film, that I’m exited to produce. We plan to bring back some of our “Rest Stop” cast on that picture. More news to come, on that project in he near future.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Something you’d like to tell our readers?

Joe McParland: Thanks for letting Seven Faces Films, talk about “Rest Stop”. I hope anyone who reads this and has hopes of making movies, understands that it is possible! Grab your phone, download some editing software, gather your friends, look around your house for props, use your house as a location and shoot something! Just make! Adios!

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