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Interviews

He is the man behind Night Surf  Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: When did you make Night Surf? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Peter Sullivan: NIGHT SURF was produced in the spring of 2001. I had optioned the rights almost a half year earlier, but it took me a long time to raise the money and also to find the perfect location. Because of budget concerns, I knew I couldn’t afford to set the movie outside on a beach at night. but I wanted to find the perfect alternative. Since I couldn’t afford to relocate the production to the East Coast, I finally found a house in the central California town of Cambria that looked like a Maine cliff-top beach house.

Once we had the location, my producers and I cast the film and dove into shooting. We shot over the course of two weekends, with another weekend of pick-up shots a few months later. The budget was a couple thousand dollars. Not much by mainstream standards to be sure, but we were a bunch of broke film school grads.

SKSM: How come you picked Night Surf to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Peter Sullivan: I liked NIGHT SURF because it was contained and because it had a small cast. I also liked it because of the themes it involved. I’ve always been fascinated by stories like LORD OF THE FLIES, which explore the mankind’s primal nature. How will people behave when they’re put in a pressure cooker and stripped of the laws of society? I thought King’s story set that up perfectly. I was so intrigued by the set up that I went a step further and extended the story in the film beyond the point where the short story ended.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Peter Sullivan: I’d heard about it in passing, but I went to a seminar where Frank Darabont was speaking, and he encouraged me to pursue my interest in doing a short film based on NIGHT SURF. I actually ran into him at a video store last year and thanked him for his encouragement.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Peter Sullivan: I’m not sure it’s so funny to the people that owned the location, but during a fight scene, our actors got a little carried away and one of them actually pushed the other THROUGH a dry wall in the hallway. We left the house with a perfect imprint of our actor preserved in the plaster for posterity. It was funny. I could hear the crunch, but I couldn’t see the indent on the monitor until I walked over to the scene of the crime.
We had another instance where we’d set up in the backyard for a shot and all of a sudden, the underground sprinkler system (which we didn’t know existed) turns on and douses our grip package in water.

That’s the fun thing about film shoots. they’re always unpredictable. I had a 30 lb dummy fall on my head in a previous film, so you never know what could happen.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd release would be possible?

Peter Sullivan: To be honest, I haven’t pursued an official video release, although I would certainly be interested in discussing it. I love the idea of the upcoming DOLLAR BABY FESTIVAL, and I think it would be terrific to be able to have a DVD compilation for fans to enjoy. If it wasn’t for video, I would have never seen the terrific WOMAN IN THE ROOM.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Peter Sullivan: I haven’t.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Peter Sullivan: I don’t have any plans at the moment, but you never know. I have other ideas, but I’m not going to give them away just yet.

SKSM: What have you been doing since ‘NIGHT SURF‘?

Peter Sullivan: I actually sold my first script while I was in the middle of reshoots on “NIGHT SURF.” It was a horror movie about a mummy on a tropical island which, luckily, has never been produced. It was a piece of exploitative schlock horror that nonetheless helped get my foot in the door as a “professional” writer. After that debacle, I went on to option another horror film with a producer at Mandalay, and that script started me off writing films for television. My television credits include “TERROR PEAK” starring Lynda Carter and Parker Stevenson, “CAVE IN” starring Mimi Rogers and Ted Shackelford, and “FAULTLINE” starring Doug Savant from “Melrose Place.” This fall I have two more movies going into production: “EVE’S CHRISTMAS” starring Elisa Donovan (“Clueless”) and Cheryl Ladd, and “BLIND INJUSTICE“, which I co-wrote with Jim Snider and C. Thomas Howell. I also recently directed my first feature, “GAME OVER,” which will be released on video next year.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Peter Sullivan:

He is the man behind The Secret Transit Codes of America’s Highways Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Brian Berkowitz: I am currently entering my final year at School of Visual Arts in New York City. I’m 22 years old working full time as a photographer while I finish up my final year at school.

SKSM: When did you make The Secret Transit Codes of America’s Highways? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Brian Berkowitz: Transit Codes was done in the Spring of 2003. All the shooting took place in one weekend which was shot in a motel in New Jersey. The full production cost in total was around $1500. It then took several month for the editing. From start to finish, including the writing, it was from about January 2003 until may 2003

SKSM: How come you picked The Secret Transit Codes of America’s Highways to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Brian Berkowitz: I read the short story, which in actuality is titled “All that you love will be Carried Away” in the summer of 2002 and I immediately wanted to adapt. I just felt an immediate love for the character and his personality and how you could see inside his head and learn what goes through an unstable mind.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Brian Berkowitz: I was unaware that he sold rights. I made the film for a class assignment and when I was happy with the results, I went about getting right to display the film in some festivals and the like.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Brian Berkowitz: This was a year and a half ago. Unfortunatly , nothing particular from that shoot stands out.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video or dvd release would be possible?

Brian Berkowitz: I am glad that King fans have the opportunity to see this film. If people are fans of this particular short story, I am happy to give them an opportunity to see it on film.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Brian Berkowitz: I’ve had no personal contact with Stephen King while making this film, aside from getting those rights for $1. As far as I know he hasn’t seen it but I would be glad to show him if he’s interested.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Brian Berkowitz: Right now Im in the middle of going through a bunch of short stories to find the next one for me to film. Some of them happen to be Stephen King stories but I havent made a final decision. Hopefully soon I’ll pinpoint the story I’m going to use. If anyone know some good Stephen King short stories, drop me an email.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Brian Berkowitz: Thanks for eveyones support and keep watching, I’ll have a new film out within a year!!

He is the man behind Rainy Season Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Nick Wauters: I was born and raised in Belgium, moved to the states where I attended Oberlin College, before moving to Los Angeles. After getting started as a production assistants on various television shows, I became an editor on reality shows and continued writing screenplays the side.

SKSM: When did you make Rainy Season? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Nick Wauters: We shot the film in the spring of 2002. It’s been a while, so i can’t remember the exact number, but I believe we spent around $10,000 total on the production. It took 3 days to shoot and many weeks of post production. Most of the people involved volunteered their services.

SKSM: How come you picked Rainy Season to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Nick Wauters: I had read Rainy Season 10 years earlier and loved it. I thought it was such a great mix of horror and comedy… It reminded me of horror classics from the ’50s, and movies such as the Blob. It followed the outline, structure and rules of a typical horror story, yet had a tongue-in-cheek twist to it. loved it!

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Nick Wauters: I had heard stories, but didn’t know if they were true. I just wrote him a few times then it just happened.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Nick Wauters: We had a lot of funny moments, although most of them during the actual shoot didn’t seem very funny but were just stressful. For instance, frogs jumping around everywhere before we’d start rolling, and not wanting to move when they were supposed to when the camera was actually rolling… The dog we used kept leaving the shot in the middle of a take… little things like that…

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video or dvd release would be possible?

Nick Wauters: There are no plans at this time. We had an agreement for a limited release in festivals because of certains contracts tying the rights to Rainy Season I believe. I get a lot of emails from people who would like to see it. Unfortunately, there’s nothing i can do at this time. Maybe there’s someone out there who wants to arrange a compilation of Stephen King shorts and deal with all the paperwork? Who knows!…

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Nick Wauters: Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)? He dropped me a few notes and i got some feedback through his assistant also. He did see the film and found it “fun and enjoyable.”

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Nick Wauters: I would of course, love to make another Stephen King story. We did look into it for a while, however the cost of producing a short and not being able to recoup your investment is considerable. Who knows, maybe in the future, I can take it to the next step. The Mist is one of my favorite stories. I believe Frank Darabont still own the option on it. I think it’s a great story and I love the open ending. The man In The Black Suit, from Everything’s Eventual, is also one of my favorite short stories.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Nick Wauters:

 

He wrote the script of Jack Sawyers‘ Gotham Cafe Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Peter Schink: I’ve primarily been a feature film editor in Hollywood for the last 16 years. I’ve done some Second Unit Directing as well as some music video directing. More recently I’ve been doing some writing and producing. I wrote a horror feature called “Legion” and have Gregory Dark attached to direct that one.

SKSM: When do you make Gotham Cafe?

Peter Schink: We’re aiming at shooting at the end of July.

SKSM: Can you tell me a little about the production?

Peter Schink: We’ve got a great leading man in Ingo Rademacher (Jax from “General Hospital”). Cullen Douglas will blow you away with his portrayal of a Maitre d’ who is off-his-rocker. And the beautiful and fantastic Julie Sands is playing Ingo’s angry wife. I’m lucky to have such an experienced and enthusiastic cast!

SKSM: How much do you think it cost?

Peter Schink: We’re spending more than most of these Stephen King dollar babies. I’ve been in the business a long time and I’m only interested in doing something as polished as the feature work I do. Also I’ve got some great, talented friends who’ve been in the industry for a long time, helping me out.

SKSM: How long wil it take to film it?

Peter Schink: We’re looking at a six day shoot which is a long shoot for a fifteen minute film but we want to get it right!

SKSM: How come you accepted Turtle Bay Entertainment’s offer to direct Gotham Cafe?

Peter Schink: It’s a favorite of King’s stories and I thought I could do something with it cinematically that’s a little different. Short films are a different media than feature films. I think it’s an opportunity to do something different that may not support itself for an entire 90 minutes. I’m planning on this one being very stylish.

SKSM: What is it in the story that you like so much?

Peter Schink: There are some interesting themes: people hung up on petty problems in the midst of life-or-death situations. And how the most minor of details can ultimately determine our fate.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video/dvd release would be possible?

Peter Schink: Well, they CAN see the film. They’ll just have to track us down at festivals. Mr. King is pretty specific about the usage of the film but who knows what will happen in the future?

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King before making the movie?

Peter Schink: No

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Peter Schink: God! There are so many! I’m still anxiously awaiting “The Mist” someday. I really love “The Boogeyman” I think that might have been the first King story I ever read and it kept me awake for years after that. In my new house I can’t see the closet door when I sleep. I like it that way!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Peter Schink: Hopefully we’ll be coming to a festival near you soon. Track us down!

 

He is the man behind The Road Virus Heads North Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Dave Brock: My name is Dave Brock and I just received my Masters Degree in Film Production at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio. For most of my life I’ve been a student, although now that i’m at the end of my academic career, I hope I can put this final degree to some use!

SKSM: When did you make The Road Virus Heads North? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Dave Brock: Trying to make RVHN hasn’t been easy, with most of the problems we experienced having something to do with money. We got the rights back in 2001, so it’s been pretty slow and, at times, laborious. Making any kind of project in an acedemic setting can be a hassle, considering the nature of film school and the myriad hoops a student must jump through in order to get anything done. We had a few false starts and some scheduling snafus with a couple of actors we had approached, but everything finally fell into place and we were finally able to shoot it in December of 2003 for a period of seven days on a (non) budget of $10,000 (financed entirely by student loans). The really cool thing is that I was blessed with an extremely talented crew who made the production value seem as if it had cost five times as much to make it.

SKSM: How come you picked The Road Virus Heads North to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Dave Brock: I blame my sister Rebecca for that one. I remember the phone call I got from her one night during my first year in film school, when she absolutely raved about the story after she read it in an anthology called “999.” I knew why she liked it so much: when we were kids, we were both freaked out by an episode of Rod Serling’s “Night Gallery” in which Roddy McDowell plays this snotty nephew who hastens his uncle’s death so he can claim an inheritance that wasn’t even his. What he inherited was a spooky old house and a painting of the family graveyard…in which he sees his dead uncle rise from the grave, shamble towards the house, open the front door…man, that was creepy! I guess it was the reaction we had to that episode, to the idea of a picture that changes, that all of a sudden came back to us and why we had reacted so strongly to RVHN. We thought it would be very, very cool if we had even the slightest opportunity to make it.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Dave Brock: I’d read about Mr. King’s kindness to struggling filmmakers in numerous articles, but in his foreword to “The Green Mile” screenplay, he went in to more detail about it as he spoke about Frank Darabont’s wonderful “The Woman In The Room.” I’m not sure if he remembers me, but I worked as a production assistant for Jay Holben for a couple of days when he shot an independent horror film in West Virginia way back in 1997. A few years later, when I read that he wrote and directed his own dollar baby called “Paranoid” (which I’d love to see) we contacted him and he generously shared his experiences in securing permission from Mr. King. My sister, along with a couple of friends of mine at film school, helped with the five months of follow-up after our initial contact in April of 2001, and we finally received permission from Mr. King’s office to start production in September of 2001.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Dave Brock: I’d say the funniest moment for me personally was towards the end of the shoot, when we were shooting Richard’s confrontation with the Road Virus. Denny Dalen, who played Richard, is a highly respected actor and theater professor here at Ohio Univerisity, and was a real trooper throughout the shoot. Anyway, here we are, in Richard’s home, the front door flung wide open, poor Denny being blasted with ice cold air from a gigantic industrial fan while being simultaneously blinded by a pair of HMI’s that were stacked on top of one another, and I’m just screaming monosyllabic instructions at the top of my lungs, like “FLICKER! LIGHTS! DOOR!”, which the crew used as cues for the scene. After the second take or so it really started to seem a little absurd (it was getting late and I was getting loopy), and all of a sudden I recalled this television image of a paratrooper practicing in a wind tunnel, his lips flapping uncontrollably because of the high-pressure blast of air hitting him in the face. So I’m watching Denny and I was imagining his lips flapping uncontrollably because of the huge fan in front of him, and I just lost it. I almost had to leave the room.

I’d say a special moment occurred on the first day, when I saw the beautiful set for the nightmare sequence (which was in the basement of a crumbling old asylum, by the way) and had the privilege of watching these really talented people working so hard after so many months of trying to get the movie going. It was pretty surreal.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video release would be possible?

Dave Brock: Well, Mr. King’s agreement is pretty explicit as to the types of exhibition the filmmaker is allowed to pursue, and for a very good reason. I think Mr. Holben explained this reason very eloquently in his interview on your site, and I’m glad that he did. I’m in the process of drafting a request to Mr. King’s office for another exhibition possibility, but in the meantime, I’m very thankful for the opportunity to be able to submit the film to festivals, and more importantly, I’m just thankful to have had the opportunity to make something that Mr. King had written, with his permission!

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Dave Brock: Mr. King’s assistants, Julie Eugley and Marsha DeFillipo, have always been kind and helpful to us and have just been wonderful. We haven’t had personal contact with Mr. King, but we are in the process of putting together a final package containing the film and other materials that I hope to send out to him soon. I really hope he likes the movie!

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Dave Brock: Oh, god…I think he wrote in one of his introductions that someone once told him that if he published his laundry list, people would buy it. I know I would, and I’d probably ask his permission to make a short film about it. Whatever he writes, I’d love the opportunity to shoot it!

I’m thrilled that Frank Darabont has the rights to “The Mist;” I think he’d do an amazing job.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Dave Brock: I’d like to thank Mr. King, of course, for his generosity, my cast and crew for a job very, VERY well done, my sister Rebecca for starting the whole thing, and to Ms. Eugley and Ms. DeFillipo for all the help. And to the others fortunate enough to secure permission to make a dollar baby, I wish you all nothing but the best of luck and I really hope that you had (or will have) just as much fun making a Stephen King story come to life as we did!

He is the man behind All That You Love Will Be Carried Away Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

James Renner: My name is James Renner, and I’m a freelance writer/director living in Cleveland, Ohio. Recently, I’ve had several articles published in a weekly magazine out here called, “Scene”. My favorite piece so far has been the story from March about three local police officers who chased a UFO into Pennsylvania in 1966. I also work on films and commercials when they come to town.

SKSM: When will you make All That You Love Will Be Carried Away? Can you tell me a little about the production? And how long take it to film you think?

James Renner: I recieved the rights to All That You Love…in August of last year. Since then, I’ve been trying to secure financing for the project. We actually had an investor who pulled out a day before we started shooting. I had to end up putting most of the expenses on a credit card. But, we did start shooting April 19th, and it went very well. Better than I could have hoped, actually. Now, I have to begin the editing process, and eventually work with the composer from Cleveland State who will write original music for the piece. His name’s Mike Bratt.

SKSM: How come you picked All That You Love Will Be Carried Away to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

James Renner: All That You Love… stands out from King’s usual writing in some way. First, it has no supernatural element, no monsters. It’s a simple story about a traveling salesman, and his search for purpose. Alfie Zimmer, the central character…the only character really, is just such a cool guy. He’s very funny, even if his intention is to kill himself.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

James Renner: I’ve been checking in with King’s office twice a year since I was 17. I found his office number while I was doing research for some high school paper.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie at the time when it’s ready? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video release would be possible?

James Renner: I don’t know if there will ever be a video release, but there are other ways for fans to see these dollar babies. Hopefully this will land in some festivals, and of course there’s the internet. I don’t want to make a profit. I just want to make something King will really like.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King before making the movie?

James Renner: I met him once at a reading in Princeton. I didn’t go there, I just crashed the reading. It was so great to hear him in person. He’s got a wonderful stage pressence and a terrific sence of humor. He looked up at the top balcony and said, “I think I saw some pieces of plaster falling from underneath you guys. Good luck up there” or something like that.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

James Renner: I would be happy to direct any future King story. They’re all wonderful. I have my favorite, but I’m not about to spill those beans.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

James Renner: Trust ka.

He is the man behind The Man In The Black Suit Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Nicholas Mariani: My name is Nicholas Mariani and i was born in Salt Lake City, UT and raised in Rochester, MN. He has worked on numerous commercials, feature films, and IMAX movies. In 2002, he served as Post Production Supervisor on the animated film The Princess and the Pea and the live action feature Jumping For Joy, which won an audience award at the Chicago Film Festival. In 2003, he produced the short film Flash in the New York City area. He is a graduate of New York University’s prestigious film program. The Man in the Black Suit marks his directorial debut.

SKSM: When did you make The Man in the Black Suit? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Nicholas Mariani: The film was shot in the summer of 2003 on location in Park City, Utah with the crew from CBS’s hit television show ‘Touched By an Angel‘. It was a twenty page script. We shot it in two days. The longest day was nine and a half hours long.

SKSM: How come you picked The Man in the Black Suit to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Nicholas Mariani: I thought it was a very interesting presentation of grief. Rather than deal with a heavy-handed one to one sort of thing, King converted what is essentially a tragic family drama into a sort of horror piece in a very interesting way. I thought it was a very compelling piece of material that had a lot going on in it. It’s got a lot of layers and on the surface, it’s a very engaging story, but there’s also a lot going on underneath it all.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Nicholas Mariani: No. I had no idea. In fact, I had approached a lot of other authors before I even thought of King. It was really just dumb luck. After getting rejected by every author in town, I sat down and read King’s latest short story collection just for pure fun and stumbled onto “The Man in the Black Suit“. I loved it. I thought ‘there’s no way Stephen King would ever let me do this.’ But, at that point, I figured I had gotten a rejection letter from everyone else, so I might as well complete my collection. To my surprise and astonishment, he said ‘yes’.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Nicholas Mariani: Not really. The whole production went pretty smoothly. That’s the benefit of working with a professional crew. I suppose the one bit of ‘trivia’ that jumps to mind is the fish we use in the beginning, which is a live fish, was actually caught about thirty seconds before the shot was taken. We had a fisherman come that day and just dropped his line and pulled out a beautiful trout for us to use. Just like clockwork. The guy really knew what he was doing! Incidentally, the fish lived and we put it back right away, so please, all you animal activists out there, don’t write me any letters.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video release would be possible?

Nicholas Mariani: Oh, they can see it. I have film festival rights and the right to show it privately. Other than that, it’s all done on a case by case scenario with King.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Nicholas Mariani: I sent him a copy but have not heard from him.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Nicholas Mariani: Nothing specific jumps to mind. Everything King’s written with the exception of maybe five or six titles has already been made. I’m excited to see what Vadim Perlman does with “The Talisman” and I’m also excited to see how “Riding the Bullet” translates.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Nicholas Mariani: I’d like to offically thank Stephen King once again and say I think it’s very cool and refreshing to see someone of his stature willing to help someone like me. Also, if there are any Hollywood producers reading this who are looking for a director, contact me immediately!!

He is the man behind Strawberry Spring Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Doveed Linder: I am 27 years old and live in St. Louis, Missouri. Making movies is what I do full-time; occasionally I work odd jobs to help pay the bills. In addition to STRAWBERRY SPRING, I have made an action/western feature called, DEFIANCE, which is distributed through Lions Gate Films. I have also made a short film adaptation of Edgar Alan Poe’s THE TELL-TALE HEART.

SKSM: When did you make Strawberry Spring? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Doveed Linder: The production of STRAWBERRY SPRING occurred from February to May of 2001, six days of shooting all together. The production cost several thousand dollars, though we still cut a lot of corners from a financial standpoint. Since we weren’t operating with a large pool of cash, we had to shoot sporratically – a weekend here and a weekend there.

SKSM: How come you picked Strawberry Spring to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Doveed Linder: I’ve always liked the story, STRAWBERRY SPRING. In 1995, when I was taking film classes, I made a 6-minute adaptation of STRAWBERRY SPRING, shot on 8mm film. This was my very first attempt at making movies. In 2001, I decided to re-make the film as a gauge to see how my skills had improved over the last six years. I also selected STRAWBERRY SPRING as a screen adaptation, because it’s a story that gives a lot of information in a short period of time.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Doveed Linder: I had read on a few occasions that Stephen King has a policy that allows any student/independent filmmaker to adapt his novellas/short stories for the price of one dollar. This policy allows the filmmaker the noncommercial rights to his story.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Doveed Linder: I can’t recall anything particularly funny about the production of STRAWBERRY SPRING. It was a production that occurred very smoothly and pretty much without a single hitch.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video release would be possible?

Doveed Linder: I feel very good about the exposure of STRAWBERRY SPRING. It has been showcased at many festivals, including the Cannes International Film Festival. It would be nice to release it on VHS or DVD with other Stephen King short films, but I haven’t pursued that avenue. It would require a considerable amount of research, paperwork, and permission from King, himself.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Doveed Linder: I have no idea if Stephen King ever saw the film. On one occasion, I received a letter from him, which basically instructed me to sign an Agreement before showcasing the film.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Doveed Linder: I would love to make another film based on the writing of Stephen King, but I don’t have any immediate plans to do so. THE REAPER’S IMAGE, THE MONKEY, CROUCH END, and MRS. TODD’S SHORTCUT are all stories that have interested me. If I was granted one wish, I would make a feature length anthology based on those stories. They are very imaginative, very visual, and would probably make for good cinema.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Doveed Linder: I can relate to all Stephen King fans, because I am a fan, myself. I hope people feel that STRAWBERRY SPRING was treated with respect and I hope to see many adaptations of King’s work in the future.

He is the man behind Luckey Quarter Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Robert David Cochrane: Born in Seattle, Washington on June 4, 1970, but I refer to myself as a native of the San Francisco Bay Area. I grew up in the east bay suburb of Walnut Creek from 1975-1988, graduating from Ygnacio Valley High School. I was a varsity athlete in football, basketball and track. I earned my B.A.degree in broadcast journalism from San Diego State University in 1992. I pursued my dream of becoming a sports broadcaster but found my interests more varied than the narrow focus of sports and moved on. After working on cruise ships in Hawaii, the Mexican Riviera and the Caribbean for two years as a disc jockey, I docked in Los Angeles to attend UCLA‘s prestigious screenwriting school.

Since graduating, I have written 20 feature scripts. Three of them have been produced into independent films: “All or Nothing“, Sugarbed Films (1998), “The Playaz Court“, Artisan Entertainment (2000) and “The long road home“, Bro n ‘Stine Productions — my own production company — (2003).

I have acted in lead roles in all three productions and made my directorial and solo producing debut with “the long road home” (WINNER — BEST FEATURE, audience award New York Independent Film and Video Festival, July 2003). “All or Nothing” is currently being considered for distribution; “The Playaz Court” was released to home video/DVD in the U.S. and Canada in Sept. 2002 by Artisan Entertainment and plays currently on Pay Per View and on Black Starz Cable Network. I recently adapted and directed two Stephen King pieces: A)”Luckey Quarter” (from King’s latest collection, “Everything’s Eventual“) and “Roland meets Brown” an exerpt from “The Gunslinger” (Grand Prize Winner in the American Gunslinger Contest).

I currently perform as Caesar at Caesars Palace on the weekends and have been featured on “The Tonight Show” with Jay Leno, The Travel Channel and MTV. I am also in several local and national commercials.

During the summer of 2002, I wrote, directed, edited and co-produced a commercial and other promotional media for Nevada Democratic Gubernatorial candidate, Chris Petrella.

I am in pre-production with two projects:
1)”Boys of Summer“, a documentary following a father with Parkinson Disease and his son around the country to see all 30 Major League Ballparks (website: http:// homepage.mac.com/bromack/).
2) “Broken Reality“, a feature I am co-directing, producing and starring in. (scheduled to begin shooting in Oct./Nov ’04).

In addition, I will begin teaching acting classes (in conjunction with the non-profit group Women in Film), am co-founder/owner of Las Vegas Link, the only casting breakdown service in Las Vegas, working on several children’s books with my father and am recording an album of songs he has written and performed.

SKSM: When did you make Luckey Quarter?

Robert David Cochrane: Shot in July 2003 (3 VERY HOT days)

SKSM: Can you tell me a little about the production?

Robert David Cochrane: The production came together very suddenly. I got the rights to the project in January 2003. I hired a producer, Steve Mandel to find the money (we projected $10,000 as the budget). The great difficulty in that is, by definition, the rights to the story are “non- commercial” — meaning there’s no money to be made off of it. It’s hard to attract investors in that light. Mr. Mandel never found that money, but he did get some people and product involved that were instrumental in making the project go.

Things got rolling very quickly in June — with a deadline to finish the project by late July to take advantage of some available editing suites (as television is on hiatus over most of the summer). The film was shot in time, but, because of difficulties in post- production, the opportunity to use those facilities was lost. I have since been slowly piecing the film together with the help of some extremely generous and talented people. It has come together beautifully.

SKSM: How come you picked Luckey Quarter to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Robert David Cochrane: I identified with the lead character, Darlene, right away. I felt for her struggle with the idea of hope — and the pain that one can experience allowing for it (or not allowing for it). It seemed like one of the stories Mr. King writes that people overlook because it’s not blood and guts horror. It’s very human. It’s about hope and faith. It reminded me, in that light, of “The Shawshank Redemption“. Also, the story is simple, takes place in Nevada and I have a background/connection with some casinos — so the producer side of me was thinking — “I can do this”.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Robert David Cochrane: I did a lot of reserach into this. As a long time “CR”, I read with special interest his notes to all of us. In those notes, in a certain piece (which I leave up to the true “CR” to find) he tells about the process of getting a “Dollar Baby”. I followed this process with two of the greatest assets I have: hope and persistance. It was certainly not a wild guess when I sent him a check. There is a process to follow and, again, I encourage anyone interested in it to really study his works, be respectful and follow the process.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Robert David Cochrane: The most special moment (or moments) was (were) sitting with Elise Robertson, a wonderful actress who portrayed Darlene, and discovering layer after layer to her character and the story. Discovery is one of my favorite elements of any artistic process and finding little moments of magic throughout was a thrill. She brought so much to the character and was extremely open to my suggestions and never complained under what were sometimes difficult situations.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video release would be possible?

Robert David Cochrane: I have a meeting with Mr. King coming up in New York soon. I will know more about the future of “Luckey Quarter” after that. Fans should keep checking in to the message boards at www.bronstineproductions.com for more updates.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Robert David Cochrane: I have yet to meet Mr. King (on any level – beyond the intimate relationship of writer/ reader and writer/adapter-director) personally.

He will see the movie (or at least have the opportunity to do so) before I meet him in New York.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories?

Robert David Cochrane: I have great hope.

SKSM: If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Robert David Cochrane: Like the rest of the world lining up, it has long been my feeling that I would be part of Mr. King’s ka-tet in making The Dark Tower into some form of movie experience. There is so much going on in that series and I feel such a deep connection to/with it that it would be the thrill and honor of a lifetime to be involved in whatever manner ka (and King) sees fit. He has said the books will have at least a five year life of their own after the seventh and final book is published. I think that’s a great idea — a gestation period, if you will. After that…it is what it is. I think winning the American Gunslinger Contest and the way I handled that work will hopefully show my dedication, passion and care for the content.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Robert David Cochrane: Mr. King has long been my favorite writer. I have also felt a sense of destiny in terms of our creative paths — knowing that somewhere along the line we would cross. Perhaps this is the depth of it, but something tells me otherwise. I look forward to working with him to help entertain, frighten (when necessary — and sometimes it is) and ultimately, shine light upon the world with hope, faith and wink of naughtiness.

Thank you,

Robert David Cochrane

He is the man behind Paranoid Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jay Holben: Wow. That’s a question for the ages, isn’t it? My name is Jay Holben, I’m a filmmaker in Los Angeles. For more than half a decade I’ve been working as a cinematographer on independent films, shorts, commercials and music videos while trying to work toward a career as a director. Prior to that I worked as a chief lighting technician and before my work in motion pictures, I worked for many years in legitimate theater as everything from a stagehand to stage manager, from master electrician to master flyman, and from lighting designer to director. Making Paranoid in 1999 was my first step toward the directing chair, professionally, and my first time back at directing since a short film that I made in 1994 back in Arizona, my hometown. Today, with several more short films and commercials under my belt as a director, I am continuing to pursue that career path while producing independent work and continuing work as a cinematographer.

SKSM: When did you make Paranoid? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Jay Holben: We shot the main body of principal photography on Paranoid on May 9, 1999 in just a single day – although I had been doing “second unit” and insert work without crew or cast (a few shots at a time) for several days prior to May 9th. That Saturday was the only day with cast and full crew and we shot the majority of the film in that day. Basically I was producing a number of independent projects – shorts and speculation commercials – all at the same time and I found that I had a window during that production rush to direct something myself (something I hadn’t done in five years). One of my philosophies of producing independent work on a limited budget is to group several projects together to share resources, that way each production only pays a fraction of the hard costs associated with equipment and services. Film costs are always a delicate subject as most people don’t want to really talk about what they spent. In my case, because of the multiple projects and because I was able to ask many favors and donations from companies I had done business with in the past, Paranoid was shot on 35mm and completed for just over $3,000. A far cry from most of the $50,000 short films that I have worked on.

SKSM: How come you picked Paranoid: A Chant to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Jay Holben: I have always loved the poem of Paranoid. Back when I was active in speech competitions in high school, I performed Paranoid: A Chant at several tournaments and did very well with it. When I realized that I had a window of time of just a single day to direct my own project, I knew that I had to find a strong piece of material that could be contained and photographed in that one day. I’ve been a King Constant Reader for many years – since the early 80’s when my brother gave me a copy of Thinner – and I immediately started thinking about Stephen’s writing as something to adapt and Paranoid was the first thing that came to my mind. Not only have I always loved the poem and always felt that it had an incredible and visceral visual sense to the prose, my idea of it was primarily housed in one location with one actress – perfect for the limitations of my shoot. So I went for it. Also, I loved the challenge of bringing a poem alive on screen. I’m often drawn to the subjects and material that most people stray away from: a single character trapped in the corner of a room, no real spoken dialogue, no character interaction – most filmmakers told me it wasn’t a good idea to make the film, and that made me love it more. I’m always up for a good challenge.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Jay Holben: There’s a mild misunderstanding here to clear up. Stephen’s Dollar Deal has been relatively famous in the King community. The author’s philanthropic policy of granting specific permission to student filmmakers (and in my case a struggling independent looking to move up the ladder) to adapt his short work rose to public prominence first with the Night Shift VHS collection in the late 80’s and then with the history behind Frank Darabont’s acquiring of the rights to The Shawshank Redemption. The misnomer is that people believe that Stephen sells the rights to these stories for $1 – and that’s not the case. Stephen grants his PERMISSION to the filmmaker to adapt the story, but no rights are granted. The rights to his stories cost thousands and thousands of dollars. What this means is that the filmmaker who is honored with Stephen’s permission may make the adaptation and show it non-commercially (in film festivals, classrooms and as examples of their work). If there is any profit, sale, commercial presentation or wide distribution to be made, then a proper negotiation has to take place for the actual rights to the story. This is an important distinction to make, as I’ll detail more in one of your next questions. Being an avid King fan, I knew of his Dollar Deal policy and was quite honored that he allowed me the permission to make this adaptation.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jay Holben: Actually yes. One of the shots in my screenplay required a cockroach to crawl across the floor. I tried to find a cockroach around my home in the two weeks prior to the shoot, to no avail (I suppose in normal circumstances, that would be a good thing). In desperation, I called a company that specializes in providing insects to motion pictures, and inquired about getting a roach. They had roaches and would send them out in batches of three with a “handler.” For transportation, handler fee and the roaches themselves, it would be $300. $100 a day, each, for a cockroach! As that would have been 10% of my entire budget, I declined their services and kept looking for a “non-union” roach. I lucked out while shooting one of the other projects in Hollywood’s Griffith park where I stumbled upon a pair of dung beetles (actually, in my book, much creepier looking than a simple cockroach). With the help of a fellow crew member (she did the dirty work, actually) we acquired the beetles and gave them temporary housing in a glass jar with dirt and dung until their day before the cameras. When that day came, I had to find a way to control the beetle during the shot. As I was shooting the “second unit” or insert shots during several nights before our main shoot (after I had finished a full day working on one of the other projects I would take the equipment home with me, unload it into my apartment, set up a couple of shots, shoot them and then go to bed to get up the next morning, reload up the equipment and go back to another shoot all day) I was all alone and had no one to help me control this roach while I operated the camera and pushed my own dolly. So I grabbed a large 44 ounce drinking cup and placed it over the beetle on the floor. When I needed her to walk across the floor, I’d lift the cup and let her go. Then I’d capture her back in the cup – gently slide the cup “back to one” and take another shot. After half a dozen shots or more, I put the beetle back in the jar and went to set up the next shot with the beetle crawling behind a toilet. After I lit that shot and had the camera set, I went to get the beetle only to find it on its back kicking in what appeared to be great agony. “Oh my God, I’ve killed it!” I thought and – about a second later – I realized how COOOL it looked! So I took the writhing beetle and put it on the floor and shot one of the more memorable moments in the film with this beetle on its back kicking and thrashing violently. When I was done with the shot, I put the beetle back in the jar – apologized for killing it – and went back to work. An hour or so later, passing by the jar again, I saw the beetle was just fine and moving around as if nothing had happened. A few days later, telling this story, I learned that certain types of insects – roaches and beetles – if they feel their life is threatened can spontaneously give birth. Amazingly, that was exactly what was happening. If you look at that moment in the film and freeze the frame – you can actually see an egg sac protruding from the beetle’s rear. After shooting the beetles were released back into the wild where, I’m told, they named the children after me.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a video release would be possible?

Jay Holben: This is a question that I get often, and it relates back to my explanation of the Dollar Deal above. The reality is that perspective can’t be further from the truth. Stephen has been EXTRAORDINARILY generous and supportive of Paranoid and has allowed it to be seen in many venues thus far. When you consider that I don’t own the rights to his story, I have merely paid him $1 as opposed to several thousand, the fact that he has allowed anyone other than my mother to see the film is remarkable. It is a true philanthropic policy that he has. In this specific case, Paranoid was the first Dollar Baby to be allowed to be released on the Internet (although Stephen’s representatives limited that time to eight months in our agreement) and Stephen gave me permission to release the film on Total Movie Magazine’s Inside DVD which had over 100,000 copies pressed and sold. Really, other than The Boogeyman and The Woman in the Room – which were both released commercially on VHS in the late 80’s – Paranoid has been the most widely released Dollar Baby to date. I have no complaints whatsoever about where I’ve been able to show this film. As a fan myself, I understand the desire to collect all the Dollar Babies – and I’ve attempted to do that by contacting as many of them as I can – but I also understand and completely respect Stephen’s position. If he allows these films to be widely released for just $1 – then he’s thumbing his nose at the real pros and studios who pay handsomely (and appropriately) for the proper rights to his work. To my knowledge, there isn’t another author of Stephen’s stature that has such a generous policy to support young filmmakers. So, for the savvy fan, there are copies of Paranoid out there. There is always the potential that there will be another venue for Paranoid’s release – although at this time nothing is planned. Really this film was just made for my “show reel” – my calling card as an example of my directorial skills – and the fact that it has been publicly seen at all is amazing. I’ve seen the Total Movie DVD’s on eBay and they seem to do fairly well. Also – when we released the high-resolution version on the Internet from the official website at www.paranoidthemovie.com, we had more than 36,000 downloads of the film – so there are a LOT of fans that got to see it and, for that, I am extremely grateful to Stephen for all his support.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Jay Holben: Not during the making of it, but I was honored that Stephen called me when he saw the copy of the film I sent him. It was a short, but fantastic conversation mostly asking about me and my background as a filmmaker. In his own succinct way, he did offer this opinion of the film: “You’ve got a good film here, I liked it.” And for me, what more do you need?

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Jay Holben: I would love to adapt another King story. There are so many that I love so much that it’s hard to narrow it down. I think far too often the adaptations of his work veer off into the goofy territory and he’s given a bad shake (especially in television), but when his work is adapted correctly, it can be an amazing film (even Oscar worthy!). Currently I have no plans to adapt another, but I’m always open if Stephen is.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jay Holben: The experience I have had after making Paranoid, and the extraordinary support from the Stephen King fans has been overwhelming. I still get regular e-mails asking about the film and how they might see it – even three years after it’s release on DVD and on the Net (it was also a top rated short on iFilm.com for several months). It has been wonderful to become a more intimate member of the King community and I’m really thankful for all the kind words and support. Keep an eye on www.adakin.com to see what we’re up to next!

If anyone is interested in reading more about Paranoid – they can visit www.paranoidthemovie.com and especially www.paranoidthemovie.com/directors_notebook – which is an intensive section on the making of the film from pre-production to post-production.

All the best,

Jay Holben, Director
Los Angeles, CA

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