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He played in Jesse James Marshall’s Dollar Baby Cain Rose Up as Curt Garrish.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Ryan Barton: My name is Ryan C. Barton and I’m an actor located in Toronto.

SKSM: How did you become involved in Cain rose up Dollar Baby film?

Ryan Barton: It’s sort of a long story. My friend Dylan Colton (who is also in the film) actually connected me with Jesse Marshall, the director, after he saw the script and thought that I’d be a good fit for the lead. So I contacted Jesse and the rest is history.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Ryan Barton: I suppose what attracts people to the story is that it’s, ironically, very unattractive. Gun violence and mental illness are very ugly subjects, and with this story you’re able to examine them from a safe distance.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Ryan Barton: I did have to audition! There’s not too much of a story there, I just sent in a self-tape and thankfully Jesse liked it!

SKSM: You worked with Jesse James Marshall on this film, how was that?

Ryan Barton: It was great! Jesse is a very talented director and it was an absolute blast getting to work with him on this. I think he’s definitely going places.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Ryan Barton: There was one thing. So in the film my character has a sniper rifle, and originally the rifle had a set of legs that you pulled down and it made the most satisfying and badass click. So we did a rehearsal a few times, but when it came time to shoot, I pulled the legs down, but instead of there being that badass click, I just broke the legs clean off. Needless to say I was very embarrassed!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Ryan Barton: I still talk to Jesse sometimes. We’ve talked about doing another project together, which I’d love to do.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Ryan Barton: Unfortunately not too much. I have my fingers in a few different scripts that I’m trying to write, but other than that and my day jobs, nothing.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Ryan Barton: I’m a huge fan! I’ve been reading his books and short stories since I was about twelve. He’s an amazing author. I actually just saw IT the other night and it completely blew me away.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Ryan Barton: I’m actually only 4-foot-5. The budget for digitally altering my height in the film was astronomical.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Ryan Barton: No problem, thank you the opportunity! As for fans, I can’t imagine I have any at this point, other than maybe my parents!

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Ryan Barton: Just that I can’t wait to hear what people think of the film!

 

He played in Matthew J. Rowney’s Dollar Baby I Am The Doorway as Arthur.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Greg Patmore: I’m from the north of England, a town called Wigan, famous for Rugby League and George Orwell’s Road to Wigan Pier. My dad was a soldier then a truck driver, my mum a nurse then a midwife. I grew up playing in brass bands and getting into school plays, but got into university to study music. I was the first in my whole family ever to get into university, Goldsmith’s College, University of London.
After that I worked in a variety of jobs, never really settling but having to do whatever it took to get by, so a lot of jobs I hated. Eventually I met my wife of 24 years and we launched our own business in 1997. In 2008, I decided to try to work as an actor musician. 3 years later I was in Hatfields & McCoys as Good ‘Lias Hatfield alongside Kevin Costner.

SKSM: How did you become involved in I am the doorway Dollar Baby film?

Greg Patmore: Matt called me out of the blue. I liked him. I liked the script. I did it.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Greg Patmore: It’s a great story. Complex, layered, terrifying and a little bit creepy too. I’m Matts hands it had a little of everything.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Greg Patmore: Not sure it was written ‘for’ me, but no audition. Matt just asked me outright.

SKSM: You worked with Matthew J. Rowney on this film, how was that?

Greg Patmore: Very good. Matt knows what he wants, and more importantly he knows when he’s got it. No extra takes for safety or extra angles for options. He’s clear in his mind and it makes it easy to deliver. He also listens to ideas and suggestions too, which makes it a collaboration.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Greg Patmore: Basically my whole role was shot in a day. We had more time scheduled, but Matt knew what he wanted and I hit it, I guess, so I got home early! That was great.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Greg Patmore: With several actually by Facebook. Matt, Ollie, most of them really.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Greg Patmore: I’m doing a lot of audio drama with Big Finish, also I’ve always loved books, so I do a lot of audiobooks. I love it. And I live a lot of the time on a barge in France, so it’s something I can do between acting roles even when I’m in the middle of nowhere.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Greg Patmore: Yes. A huge fan since I was young. I read everything I could get my hands on by him back then, and I’ve read more of his books than by any other author. Favourites include Christine, Firestarter, Needful Things, Pet Sematary, Carrie… so many.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Greg Patmore: I’m shy. Really quite reclusive unless I fight it. No one believes that, but it’s true.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Greg Patmore: Watch out for Matt. He’s going to make big movies one day. I just hope I’m involved, as we worked great together.

SKSM: Do you like something to add?

Greg Patmore: The Dark Half. Carried off by a flock of birds? I never really bought that. Looking forward to the new IT movie, though. Love that book…
And was Stephen King a Ray Bradbury fan, because I sense so much common ground in their writing.

 

He played in David Toms’ Dollar Baby Bike as Wheeler.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Adrian Annis: I’m an actor who either appears in weird and wonderful shorts films or plays weird and wonderful characters in such films.

SKSM: How did you become involved into Bike Dollar Baby film?

Adrian Annis: I became involved in Bike via the usual process. I saw a casting call on a casting web site, it intrigued me, I applied, I auditioned via Skype, I got the part and I filmed it.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Adrian Annis: I think like most Stephen King adaptations the writing makes you think and question yourself. Bike is a prime example of that.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Adrian Annis: I had to cast by the wonderful medium of Skype over a broadband that was not much better than dial up. I was amazed they could even make my face out to be honest!

SKSM: You worked with David Toms on this film, how was that?

Adrian Annis: David was an actors Director. What I mean by that he was very open at allowing a scene to flow and make minor tweaks with each run though. He let it be natural.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Adrian Annis: Well we filmed it along a country road very late at night around March time. So it was cold and if I remember rightly wet! Now actors can be a moany bunch at the best of times, however one of the other actors, Denny Hodge, does some amazing impressions of some of the main Saturday night TV characters of the 80s. So yes cold and wet but laughing our heads off!!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Adrian Annis: I’m still in contact with David Toms, Denny and Steve. Mainly on Facebook, but also out of the social medium spectrum. At castings, filming etc

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Adrian Annis: I have a few projects in the pipeline that are very much in the development stage. I don’t want to jinx them by mentioning their names as yet….. Silly I know!!

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Adrian Annis: I’ve been a huge fan of Stephen King for a very long time. My first exposure was from me sneaking out of my bedroom and watching Salems Lot over my parents shoulders. I don’t think I have slept with my window open ever since. Plus my fear of Clowns went to ‘needing counselling’ levels after IT.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Adrian Annis: That I’m a collector of cult novels and comics. I even had a 1st Edition of Junk, William Burroughs 1st novel. You notice the past tense in that statement……. it still pains me to think of it’s demise!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Adrian Annis: Enjoy the wonder of Stephen Kings works and their screen adaptions!

 

He is the man behind Here There Be Tygers Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Mike Johnston: My name is Mike Johnston, I am an independent filmmaker from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. I was born and raised in Oakville, Ontario, Canada and moved to Vancouver to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Film Production from the University of British Columbia, which I completed in 2017.
Currently I work as a Key Grip in the film industry in Vancouver as well as produce independent content such as music videos, short films and various commercials and web ads in Vancouver.

SKSM: When did you make Here there be tygers? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Mike Johnston: Here There Be Tygers is my sixth short film as a director. We began prepping for the film in Vancouver in September 2016 and shot it in December 2016. After 5 months of post-production, the film was completed in May 2017.
The film cost approximately $8,000 including post production costs and was we completed principal photography in just 2 days, which was quite remarkable for the piece we were shooting and the gags and visuals involved.

SKSM: How come you picked Here there be tygers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Mike Johnston: The decision to adapt Here There Be Tygers is an interesting one. In August 2016, I had just completed the festival circuit with my last film, “Victory Falls”, which I wrote and directed, and was searching for my next project. I was writing a variety of pieces and wasn’t really getting excited about any of them. I also find that I need to constantly push the boundary or challenge myself with my work, and I was looking for the right way to challenge myself after “Victory Falls” – a wrestling film that took place during the 1996 World Championships and on the water.

I started looking into adaptation, and came across Stephen King’s dollar baby program on his fan website. It was an exciting concept for an independent filmmaker looking for his next project, so I started reading a variety of different Stephen King short stories and came across “Here There Be Tygers”, and decided to submit to adapt that one. I emailed Margaret Morehouse, signed the contract and sent $1 American dollar bill in the mail. I don’t think he would have accepted a Canadian loonie.
I think what interested me so much in “Here There Be Tygers” is that I found the character of Charles very relatable, especially to a young me. I was always the kid who was day dreaming in elementary school, never really listening in class and I saw a lot of that in Charles. Especially with how I chose to adapt the film, the realism of the tiger is up for debate and for the audience to interpret in their own imagination, which is really what Charles is doing. He is this boy with a wonderful imagination, who at the end of the day just wants to go to the bathroom and get back to class. And I found this very relatable and I think a lot of kids can too. It was nice to take a break from the moody dramas that I am used to making and adapt a fantastic kid-oriented fantasy film by one of my biggest creative inspirations.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Mike Johnston: The entire experience was special for me. For all my other previous short films that I have directed, I have also written. And I think, when we act as both writers and directors, we put a tremendous responsible on our shoulders as creatives. Not only are you responsible for the creative direction and storytelling of the film, but I find you can also back yourself into a corner obsessing over every word and every little detail. My focus when directing is always the performances of the actors and how the camera drives those performances. Having not written this film, that additional pressure was off and it was now an open opportunity for me to play with someone else’s work and adapt it to the screen.
There is still a tremendous responsibility in that, but the obsession over dialogue and every spoken word goes away, and you can let the actors really play and that is the way I want to make movies going forward. I was very lucky to work with a young man by the name of Logan Oung who played Charles. A young boy, still finding his way in the world of acting and film, etc. but also unbelievably smart, he challenged me in a lot of ways and pushed me to be better and to be better for him as well. An awesome moment we shared actually happened during rehearsal, days before principal photography. We were rehearsing in a small room and I was going through the blocking of when he first sees the tiger, one of the most important scenes in the film. And he wasn’t really getting it. I started stressing out a bit, like have I made a huge mistake, did I mess up in the casting, is it my direction, etc. So we sat down and we talked for a while and we figured out that we both loved video games. And once I was able to relate the action and the blocking to an experience he had playing video games, he got it immediately. It was awesome to see this switch flip, when he got it – he got it. And because of the way we chose to shoot the film, much like Steven Spielberg’s “JAWS”, the film is driven by his performance and the success of it rides on his shoulders. Needless to say, I believe the film is what it is because of Logan and what he brought to the film and I couldn’t have done it without him.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Mike Johnston: It is disappointing, as I would love to share my work with other Stephen King fans and dollar baby filmmakers, but I also respect and understand the rules and as to why we cannot share our films on the internet as of yet. Hopefully that could change over time, but I don’t expect it to.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Mike Johnston: So far, all the reviews we have received from peers, critics, festivals, etc. have been very positive, which is awesome because I really put the pressure on myself to uphold the legend and the quality of the short story as well as the Stephen King name, so to hear good things from my peers and critics alike, is great.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Mike Johnston: My priority is to screen the film at as many Dollar Baby film festivals as possible. We have already been accepted to one in the Netherlands in November, which is awesome news. As well, we are currently in consideration for the King on Screen film festival. Outside of those, I would love to see the film play at the Vancouver Short Film Festival or East Van Showcase, but time will tell and see where it takes us.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations

Mike Johnston: I am a huge Stephen King fan, have been since I was a teenager. He is one of my greatest inspirations in filmmaking. “The Mist”, ‘The Shining” and “It” are some of the early works that got me interested in a future in filmmaking as well as the films. Whenever a Stephen King novel or film becomes available, I make sure to make time to read it or see it. So, 2017 is a great year for him so I will be spending lots of time in the theatre or on Netflix watching Stephen King adaptations.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Mike Johnston: I have yet to hear anything from Mr. King, and I cannot confirm if he has seen the film or not. Needless to say, if he did see it and was able to comment on the film, that would be one of the greatest honours I would have as a young filmmaker.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Mike Johnston: Actually, I have already begun light prep for my next short film, which I believe will be a Stephen King adaptation. The short story is called “Rest Stop” and is about a writer who stops in a gas station washroom for a break and overhears a man beating his wife in the other washroom. As such, he decides to take matters into his own hands like the characters in his books. Another very relatable story in my eyes, I think everyone at one point or another in life has fantasized about being the action hero and taking the law into their own hands, for better or worst and as such a character that we can all get behind and understand, even on deeper levels. Clearly I enjoy making films in bathrooms.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Mike Johnston: Right now I am working with a production company in Vancouver which works in conjunction with the Lifetime Network and Hallmark Channel to produce ten television movies a year, we just wrapped our 6th production this year and are starting the 7th next week. I currently working as the Key Grip there, the head of the Grip Department. Additionally, I am prepping to produce and direct, “Rest Stop”, my second Stephen King dollar baby film. As well, as in the early development stages of outlining my first feature film, currently titled, “Shrapnel”.

 

He played in Kyle Thompson’s Dollar Baby A Very Tight Place as Curtis Johnson.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Peter Wood: I’m Peter and I am an actor based in the North West of England. I work in live interactive performance such as Murder Mystery weekends as well as commercials, film and television and role-play. I’ve also worked on many University films.

SKSM: How did you become involved in A Very Tight Place Dollar Baby film?

Peter Wood: I heard about it from a member of the team and was very keen to find out more.

SKSM: What do you think it is in the story that attracts people so much?

Peter Wood: It is a great story because it is one of those situations which could easily get out of control. Stephen King has this great ability to take ordinary scenarios and take carry them to the next stage which he did brilliantly in the case of A Very Tight Place.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Peter Wood: I auditioned for the part and was fortunate enough to be selected. At that time I was unaware of the make up/effects to be used, but it wouldn’t have put me off, I like a challenge.

SKSM: You worked with Kyle Thompson on this film, how was that?

Peter Wood: Kyle and his team are passionate about their projects and were great to work with. There were several issues outside of their control which could have caused some people to simply abandon the Project, but they overcame them and carried on.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Peter Wood: Interesting question. I was aware of the passion and pleasure the team got from making this film when I could see the happy smiles on their faces as several buckets of what convincingly looked like human waste were poured over me. The outdoor location days happened to be rather cold and, even before I was doused, my teeth were chattering so, on occassion, I was unable to get some of my words out which resulted in some re-takes. Sharing an overturned Portaloo with a camera operator and all sorts of strange liquids was also memorable. Would I have taken part if I had known all of this? Of course I would, the whole project was memorable and enjoyable. I have this very bad habit of taking on work without checking all the details, thank goodness I did that on this occasion. Let’s hope that the next one I get like this is during the summer – that would be luxury.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Peter Wood: I’ve done some work with several of the team members since which, as always, was enjoyable.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Peter Wood: I’m currently working on another short film and writing a murder mystery script.

SKSM: Are you a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Peter Wood: Absolutely! Stephen King is one of the greatest writers of our time. One of my favourite books, which I have read several times, is The Talisman, which he co-wrote with Peter Straub. I have read most of his work.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Peter Wood: As an actor one needs several ‘hats’. One of the jobs I have done in between projects, was as a private investigator, which I suppose is also a form of acting. I did this on and off for a number of years.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Peter Wood: I would say to anybody thinking of taking on a Dollar Baby Scheme to do it. Where else would you get the chance to work with the talents of such a great storyteller as Stephen King?

SKSM: Would you like to add something?

Peter Wood: Thank you for listening to my ramblings. Also, thank you Oscar for talking with me. I’m off now to look for the next challenge.

 

He is the man behind The Reaper’s Image Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Pablo Maysonet: I’m a filmmaker working out of Los Angeles who specializes in the horror genre. Over the past 14 years I’ve produced over 16 films. 3 of which were feature films that all got international distribution.

SKSM: How would you decide that shoot movies was your mission?

Pablo Maysonet: I gradually got into filmmaking by accident. At the time I was a video editor and was in the process of producing a short film for a local music group. Once that fell apart I was so attached to the video concept that I felt it could be a short film. From there we eventually developed a feature film and decided to give that a try. I fell in love with the process of storytelling through film. The rest is history.

SKSM: The reaper’s image Dollar Baby it was going to be a stop motion animated Dollar Baby but never was filmed. Could you tell us a little bit more about it?

Pablo Maysonet: The short film was an awesome idea but I didn’t want to shoot it as a traditional film. One or two existed before then and I just didn’t want to repeat the same old stuff. As a filmmaker you try not to repeat yourself and instead create something different and challenge yourself. We ended up developing a very unique way of stop motion animation and figured the story would lend itself perfectly to it. Although it was a very tedious process the results were amazing. Unfortunately we were also in the process of developing my third feature film. Since the reaper’s image would’ve taken a very long time to finish, it ended up being put on hold indefinitely while we developed my third feature.

SKSM: Who would be involved into this project?

Pablo Maysonet: It would’ve been an extremely small project considering it would all be voice acting. We did approach a few “horror icons” to do some voice work on the film but shortly after we cancelled it.

SKSM: How come you picked The reaper’s image to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Pablo Maysonet: I like the mystery behind the story. Some of the most intriguing stories to me are ones that contain objects that have no explanation on why they have the powers they do. It’s a short but grim story.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Pablo Maysonet: At the time when we received our contract to my knowledge there was only maybe one or two. After we moved on from our short we saw more and more pop up. I have not seen any of those.

SKSM: I know you are a Stephen King fan but, which are your favorite works and adaptations?

Pablo Maysonet: My all-time favorite horror movie is “Creepshow”. Which is both an adaption and original work from Stephen. But besides that one it would be a tie between “The Stand” and “It”.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Pablo Maysonet: I accidentally stumbled upon it. I was researching Stephen for another project and discovered the dollar baby program.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Pablo Maysonet: Most recently I’ve been doing a lot of behind the scenes work on film and TV for several major studios in LA. In between shooting and editing these projects I’m developing two features of my own. We’ve gotten great responses from producers interested in working on them, so we’ll see what happens.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Pablo Maysonet: I am a former two division martial arts national champion.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Pablo Maysonet: Thanks for all the support and hopefully I’ll be able to work on more Stephen King projects in the near future.

SKSM: Would you like to add something else to this interview?

Pablo Maysonet: Nothing else thanks for reaching out

 

He is the man behind Harvey’s Dream Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Can you introduce yourself to our readers?

Alex von Hofmann: I am a filmmaker from Perth, Western Australia. I am a writer and director and I love to work in the horror, thriller and survival genres. I have made a series of short films over the last eight or nine years. They have screened at festivals and won awards all over the world and a few times I have been lucky enough to travel with the films and meet the great audiences and filmmakers at those festivals.
I have a love for horror that started when I was about five. My father and I went from video shop to video shop working our way through the horror sections of each. We watched everything, good and bad. That way I learnt the power of storytelling, make-believe, and the human response to fear, which is still our oldest and most powerful emotion. It took along time for me to circle back to these roots, but when I was about 25 I started to think about making horror films myself, and I wrote my first short script.

SKSM: When did you make Harvey’s dream? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Alex von Hofmann: I made Harvey’s Dream in 2015. I had just been through a long and hard filmmaking experience on my previous short, and I wanted somthing that wasn’t going to be funded and I could simply make the way I wanted to. I got the rights to Harvey’s Dream and wrote the script pretty quickly. So much of it is Harvey’s monologue, which is filled with great Stephen King dialogue. The challenge was about making Janet’s inner thoughts available to audiences through her actions on screen. But it came together well, and I had some strong visual ideas that I was excited to try. We got together a very small crew, two brilliant local actors, and shot it over two days. All up we spent $400 dollars – on some lights, equipment and food. It is still the easiest shoot I have ever worked on. Everything just fell into place.

SKSM: How come you picked Harvey’s dream to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Alex von Hofmann: I loved the tone of the piece the most. It has this deep, building dread that grows as Harvey recounts his dream. It’s like a third carácter in the story. It seems to wind its was through the suburb and land in the kitchen of this elderly couples house, and once it’s there with them, there is no escaping it. I wanted to take on the challenge of bringing that feeling to the screen.

SKSM: Harvey’s dream was selected in a lot of Festivals. Has the movie received any awards?

Alex von Hofmann: No it didn’t, in the end. I was really happy with the number and quality of the festivals that selected it. The feedback from festivals and audiences was really positive. But it didn’t win any awards. Here in Western Australia James Hagan (who plays Harvey) was nominated for a WA Screen Award for best actor.

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Alex von Hofmann: The film has pretty much completed it’s festival run now. If it were invited to another festival, I’d absolutely enter it. But I have made two short films since then and I can usually only market one at a time.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Alex von Hofmann: When I was looking for the perfect location for the film, I ended up doing a lot of driving around and random door knocking. But I wasn’t having any luck. I needed a very specific layout for the story to make sense. So I typed up a letter and dropped it off in houses all over the neightbourhood that looked promising from the verge. One day I got a call from a woman who said she was a huge Stephen King fan and that Harvey’s Dream was one of her favourite stories. She said I could come look at her kitchen. I wasn’t sure what her house would be like, but it was absolutely perfect. Then she told me that her Maiden name was Harvey. And that is where we filmed. I guess it was meant to be.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?
Alex von Hofmann: We have received lots of really positive reviews for the film over the years. And it’s been a real pleasure to sit in audiences and see people react to the ending in such a dramatic way. I can’t say we’ve had a negative review yet, which is nice.

SKSM: This was your second Dollar Baby Film adaptation. Could we see a third one in the future?

Alex von Hofmann: Maybe. I have been focusing on feature films over the last couple years though. I have three original horror scripts that I am developing, in the hopes to attract funding to one. In the meantime I may take on another one so that I can keep my directing skills fresh, but I dont have any in mind yet.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Alex von Hofmann: No, I wish! With both dollar baby projects there has been zero contact. Everything runs through his office, and I’m not even sure if he watches the films when they are delivered. I like to think that maybe, when he has a spare hour off, he goes to the shelf and chucks on a couple dollar babies.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations.

Alex von Hofmann: Yes, I am a big fan. I read most of his books. My favourite works are the Dark Tower books, The Shining, 11/22/63, loved the Full Dark, No Stars collection. My favourite adaptations are still The Shining and Shawshank Redemption, but I have a soft spot for almost all of them.

SKSM: Tell us a little about your future projects. What are you working nowadays?

Alex von Hofmann: I’m writing a few horror features. One is a paranormal thriller/horror about a nurse looking after an old woman with Locked In Syndrome, and the old womans past comes to haunt her. The other is about the power of the mob in influencing politics through social media. It’s an exploration in how low a group of people can sink when group hysteria takes them. My hopes are to get one or both of those funded and made in the next few years.

SKSM: Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. Do you want to add something more to this interview?

Alex von Hofmann: Thank you for your interest in dollar babies. I love that Stephen King has made this opportunity available to filmmakers. While it’s a shame that most don’t have a life beyond the festival circuit, it’s still a fantastic learning exerience to work with such well written source material.

Cheers
Alex von Hofmann

 

He is the man behind Cain Rose Up Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jesse James Marshall: My name is Jesse James Marshall, and I am a Filmmaker from Toronto, Canada.

SKSM: When did you make Cain rose up? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Jesse James Marshall: I got the rights for the short back in April, 2016. I was going to the Toronto Film School at the time I heard about Stephen King’s Dollar Baby Program and decided to look deeper into it. There was a list of available shorts to choose from and I chose “Cain Rose Up.” It was a good story and it was “easy” enough to film, because I was living in a dorm building and the story takes place in one. I wrote a script which went through many stages of drafts up until December 2016 when we started principal photography for the film. It lasted for 3 days mainly during early December and we filmed some add
in stuff early 2017. All in all I spent around 10,000 Canadian Dollars on the film in its entirety.

SKSM: How come you picked Cain rose up to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Jesse James Marshall: I wanted to do a short film but am not the best at creating a story from scratch. Being able to get a hold of Stephen King’s Cain Rose Up was ideal for me because the story was already made I just had to adapt a script. I liked the idea of making a movie about mental illness and Curt’s mind was crazy enough.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations

Jesse James Marshall: Of Course I’m a fan of him, I have the “Skeleton Crew” book that “Cain Rose Up” was from. One of my favourite movies is “Shawshank” and I can’t wait for “It” too come out in a week!

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Jesse James Marshall: I found out from one of my teachers at the Toronto film school who had a friend who did a Dollar baby short as well.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jesse James Marshall: I originally had a role in the film as the “nerd” in the hallway, but I eventually cut out that scene in the movie because it was a little cheesy and not needed. You can still see me in the final cut at the beginning of the movie walking towards the dorm building though.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Jesse James Marshall: It sucks, I really wish I could put this on my YouTube channel for everyone to see, maybe Stephen King will update his terms and conditions soon on the contract for the dollar baby program.

SKSM: What “good or bad” reviews have you received on your film?

Jesse James Marshall: I had a cast, crew and family showing of the film back in May (2017) and everyone loved it! But that being said we all worked on it and don’t want to even think its bad because of how much time we spent on it, HAHAHA

SKSM: Do you plan to screen the movie at a particular festival?

Jesse James Marshall: We will be premiering to the public on September 23rd, 2017 at the Toronto International Shorts Film Festival (TISFF) at the Art Gallery of Ontario.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Jesse James Marshall: Nope, None. I was in Contact with his secretary for everything, I have sent in the Dvd of the film along with a script but haven’t heard anything yet.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick -at least- one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Jesse James Marshall: I was looking through other short stories of his and “Here there be Tygers” caught my eye, so maybe in the future ill take on that project.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Jesse James Marshall: Currently working on a longer war short about 30 minutes in length, I’ve always wanted to make a war movie.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Jesse James Marshall: I don’t think I have any fans yet!! HAHAHA! but make sure to check out my YouTube channel to watch the trailer and behind the scenes for “Cain Rose Up” and check out my website for my production company Gingerbread House. Cain Rose up is also on IMDb! Thanks for the Interview Oscar.

http://www.youtube.com/c/GingerbreadHouse
https://www.gbhvideo.ca

 

 

He is the man behind Cain Rose Up Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jake Kaufman: My name is Jake Kaufman, I’m 26. I’m from a small town in Southeast Kansas. Currently I’m working in IT but I’m trying to go back to school to obtain a MFA.

SKSM: Your Dollar Baby Cain rose up was cancelled back in 2013 because a controversial nature of the script by changing the ending. Is it fixed? Could we the fans finally see it in the future?

Jake Kaufman: The ending is still the same. I was attending a private religious university so they were pretty restricting on what they considered appropriate. I decided not to change the ending to the script because I think what I had was a stronger ending. It’s still there. I put it on the backburner because you’ve got to shoot it on a college campus or it won’t work. I’m hoping to get back to it soon-ish. I’ve got some other things I’m working on first. One day though, I’ll get around to it.

SKSM: Who are involved into this project? Tell us about the cast and crew a little bit more.

Jake Kaufman: I was the writer/director (though I didn’t write the brilliant ending). I was probably going to shoot it and do sound on it as well. It was obviously a very indie, no-budget sort of thing. I like shooting stuff with as minimal of cast/crew as possible. It really happens me direct the actors. I’ve never been a stickler for super technical filmmaking either.  My friend Spencer Bergman was originally slated to play the main character. I’m sure once I get back around to making it that the cast/crew will be completely different. I’ll probably cast a local actor at whatever college I try to shoot it at.

SKSM: How come you picked Cain rose up to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Jake Kaufman: The piece is a about a school shooting and at the time I could see the rise of right wing fanaticism in the country and that’s what drew me to the story. The main character was, to me, the prototype for every edgy 20 year old who voted or sympathized with Trump. I wanted to make a film about a school shooting that didn’t try to sympathize or empathize with the shooter. That idea of someone just being capable of such an evil act is a thematic element in a lot of Stephen King stories. It’s what I’ve always identified with. Garrish, to me, wasn’t a sympathetic character. He selfish and ego driven. He has an inferiority complex based on his false intelligence. He’s the libertarian nightmare made real. Probably reads a lot of Ayn Rand. It’s pretty timely if you ask me, especially now.

SKSM: Did you know that this story has already been filmed as Dollar Baby? Have you seen any of these adaptations? If so, what do you think about it?

Jake Kaufman: Yeah, I was aware that this one has been made a couple of different times. I’ve seen some of them but I think for the most part they all were hitting the material in the wrong way. They were either too sympathetic towards Garrish as a character or trying to be some sort of Tarantino knock-off. With that being said, I’m always appreciative of films being made and obviously I didn’t finish mine, so I’m not sure that I would have been successful in accomplishing what I wanted to in my film.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations.

Jake Kaufman: I love Stephen King. My grandma introduced me to him from a very young age. Her death definitely played a part in why I didn’t finish the film, but it’s also playing a part in why I haven’t fully given up on it yet. Book wise my favorite is Night Shift and The Long Walk. They’re perfect. King is the master of the short story. Film wise my favorites are The Shining (the Kubrick version, not the TV movie), Silver Bullet, Creepshow, Cujo, Shawshank. Pretty much the hits. I really think someone could do something really cool with a Cujo or Silver Bullet remake. Silver Bullet especially is an underlooked gem.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Jake Kaufman: I saw an interview with Frank Darabont. He’s obviously the king of the dollar babies.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Jake Kaufman: I raised $500 last February to make a short film called OUT THERE. It’s based on the horror short story Le Horla by Guy de Maupassant. Almost had a hickup on that production as well. I tried to rush into too fast. Now we’re about a week away from starting full production. My cameraman, J Berry, and I shot some footage of the eclipse for the film. It’s going to be really spooky and weird. It’s sorta my tribute to David Lynch.

SKSM: What is one thing people would be surprised to know about you?

Jake Kaufman: I’m terrified of the dark but horror is my favorite genre. Go figure how that works out.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Jake Kaufman: I’d just like to say for anyone reading this to find solace in my failure to complete this film. At the time, when I couldn’t complete this film I was really salty about it. I still am kinda salty about it. But I can also recognize that I wasn’t ready to make this film back then. Sometimes things don’t work out but don’t give up. Keep pushing forward. Remember it took Lynch 4 years to finish Eraserhead. If you’re supposed to make it, it’ll happen. Forward always.
PS. Sorry about the double Lynch plugs. I’ve been watching a lot of Twin Peaks. 🙂

 

He is the man behind L.T’s Theory Of Pets Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Neville Steenson: I am a Producer, Screenwriter and Actor from Northern Ireland. I have been working in the film industry for over 15 years and my short films have been screened all around the world from New York to London and on TV in the UK and Europe.
As an Actor I have appeared in Game of Thrones and Dracula Untold and had the pleasure to
share the screen with Eileen Dietz (The Exorcist) in a film I am also wrote the Screenplay for.
Eileen would later go on to win an award for her perfomance in the short film in New York.
I have also had 2 Childrens book’s published and are available on Amazon, Beedy Baddy the Amazing Dog-Frog and Chopper and the Haunted Dog Kennel.

SKSM: Why L.T.’s theory of pets was cancelled? Is it possible for Stephen King fans to see it in a future?

Neville Steenson: We had everything in place and had cut a teaser trailer for the film and had the support of Kickstarter for the project. However we failed to reach our target amount and the project fell through. It was a hard pill to swallow after all the work we did on the film and it was a passion project for both I and the Director Brian McGleenon.
The money wasn’t there and we had a set amount we needed as the readers of this story will know there is no cutting corners with animal wranglers and the period setting.
Of course we aim to make it in the future and who knows what might happen but we have had to put it aside for now. There is always hope.

SKSM: However you had in the cast a UK comedian to play the leading role. Can you tell us a
little bit more about it?

Neville Steenson: Yes the casting of Patrick Monahan a very well known and loved Stand up Comedian from the UK was something I pushed for as Screenwriter and Producer. Patrick is mostly known for Comedy but he has so much more to offer. The story in itself is darkly comic so having a straight up serious actor would have taken from the L.T character I believe.
Patrick has exactly what I seen in this character while reading and adapting the story He is an everyman and one with must connect to the audience. We also had the Northern Irish actress Joleen O’Hara attached to play his wife Lulu. Another great actress who i had worked with in the past and knew they would play the characters perfectly. Both Actors were ready and passionate about the project and the spin we brought to the original story.

SKSM: How did you get involved in this project?

Neville Steenson: When I applied for the story through the Dollar Babies scheme I knew I wanted to do the adaptation and to produce the film version. My first port of call was to adapt the Screenplay and to attach a Director. That is where Brian McGleenon came in. He is a Director who’s work I had admired a lot and he was a huge King reader and fan. We spent endless evenings talking about how and where we wanted the project to go. I was involved from start to untimely ending of the project as Producer.

SKSM: How come you picked L.T.’s theory of pets to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Neville Steenson: The reason I picked L.T was firstly because it is a fantastic story and gives you a real look into King’s humour and pathos as a story teller. Secondly I picked the story because it was a departure from his more horror themed short stories. When you think of his other non horror adaptations you get films such as Stand By Me, The Shawshank Redemption and The Green Mile to name a few. This is more the avenue I wanted to explore as they are works of great depth.
Another reason I picked it was because I could put an interesting slant on the story. Originally the story is is set in the backdrop of an axe murderer and the cloud of paranoia. What I did was take it from America and set it in the backdrop of the 1970’s England during the backdrop of the Yorkshire Ripper which was a horrid time for people living it. Then I took that and had L.T narrate the story as an old man. This was interesting to me as it deals with a love lost and the uncertain outcome of a now estranged marriage. I found it fit very well with the tone the undercurrents of the original story. On a personal note I still think it’s the best work I have done as a Screenwriter.

SKSM: Did you know that this story is not yet adapted as Dollar Baby Film?

Neville Steenson: No I was not aware of this when I first optioned it but I learned it not long after. This is a shame really as it is a very different kind of story and one that would make for a fantastic film. However I have learned first hand that it has to be done right. It needs a proper budget and there would be no corners cut or it would suffer.

SKSM: Are you a Stephen King fan? If so, which are your favorite works and adaptations.

Neville Steenson: I am a massive Stephen King fan and have an extensive libary of his work. No other story teller has had such a profound effect on me and inspired me to pick up a pen as he has. Wow where can I start picking my favourite works by the Master. Book wise I Love his book IT and the Stand and his more recent little book Joyland was a fantastic piece. As a writer he has changed with the times and his work has matured but the one thing that has never changed is his ability to connect with his reader. The Constant Reader if you will. One thing is certain when you pick up one of his books it will grab you and hold you right through to the final word and beyond.
Film wise for me Stand By Me has a special place as my favourite King adaptation, Misery also has to feature and the original Salem’s Lot. That would be my personal favourites.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Neville Steenson: I was aware he did this through reading an interview with him and then a filmmaking friend posted about it saying the scheme was open and so I applied and got the rights.

SKSM: What are you working nowadays?

Neville Steenson: Post L.T I have been very busy on a number of feature film projects. One is an Asian Horror which is being developed through NI Screen (Game of Thrones, High Rise) and is a horror about a young woman who must fight to save her unborn child from a dark Cult.
The other feature film I am working on is another adaptation (I will never learn!) this one is a Jane Austen film anda period piece and we have attracted some major talent and interested but I can not really talk about it at the moment due to the nature of the productions development. Both projects and very different but are great fun to be Producing.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to our readers?

Neville Steenson: I would just like to say to your readers a big thank you for taking the time to read this and hope I have not put you to sleep reading it. I really want to add it is fantastic for such a great forum about King and his work is out there. Keep up the great work and I would love to hear from you guys so check me out on Twitter.
Thank you again for the oportunity.

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