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Title: Night surf (2007)
Runtime: 10′
Director: Samuel Vary
Script: Samuel Vary
Cast: Zach Vary, Simon Vickery, Will Eberle, Bruce Osterling, Molly Jordan, Siobhan Anderson
Trailer
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He is the man behind In The Cutting Room Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Tyson Steigers: I am a 25 year old male currently living and working in Los Angeles. Professionally I am a motion graphic designer (sort of a blend of graphic design and animation for those who aren’t familiar), but I love all aspects of filmmaking. Recently I’ve been experimenting with stop motion animation, and try to produce/direct my own personal projects when I have the time.

SKSM: When did you make In The Cutting Room? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Tyson Steigers: In the Cutting Room was shot over the course of four weekends in January/February of 2005. We shot in Mt Hood Community College’s funeral services department outside of Portland, OR. Being my first live action production, as well as my senior film, I didn’t have much of a budget to work with. I did however have great equipment resources from school at my disposal, and a dedicated, talented crew to work with. I think when it was all said and done, we had spent just under $500.

SKSM: How come you picked In The Cutting Room to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Tyson Steigers: It’s funny, because as soon as I finished the story I started adapting the screenplay. I think it was the challenges that the story presented from a filmmaking perspective that were so appealing to me. From the very beginning I decided that I was not going to use any internal VO for Howard’s character, or any flashback scenes. While these techniques can be effective, especially in the case of a story like Autopsy Room Four, I felt that as a filmmaker, they seemed a bit cliche. I wanted to see this story translated to screen in a way that lets the audience figure out what’s going on for themselves as opposed to having all of the information handed to them.

SKSM: Why did you changed the orginal title “Autopsy Room Four” into “In The Cutting Room”?

Tyson Steigers: I thought that while my adaptation doesn’t stray too far from the original story, I did make some of my own decisions as to how the story would play out that differed from King’s version. While ultimately Autopsy Room Four was the primary inspiration for the film, I felt that my film was more inspired by, than it was based on the original story. So I stole the title of my first editing reel “In the Cutting Room” and left it at that.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Tyson Steigers: You know I didn’t really know until I got in contact with yourself. From the beginning I wanted to aquire rights for festival purposes, but being that it was a student project, my motivation for producing the film was more for expecience and exposure that for profit.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Tyson Steigers: I think that the fact that we were shooting in a fully functioning morgue, including the real bodies in the freezer is what really stands out to me overall. I’ll never forget the smell of the formaldehyde in the air that tainted all of our coffee and craft services.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a dvd or internet release would be possible?

Tyson Steigers: I would like to get the film out there, but I think having been a student work, I really haven’t had any time to make it a priority since my professional career began. There actually was a very limited DVD release when we screened the film in Portland in May of 2005. I have actually always wanted to put together an anthology, so who knows, maybe it’ll be a part of that.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Tyson Steigers: I sent out a bunch of letters and copies of the film to some of his people. Never heard back though, so I couldn’t tell you whether he’s seen it or not.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Tyson Steigers: No current plans, but I have thought about the possibility of producing The Road Virus Heads North.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Tyson Steigers: Be Cool

He’s the man behind the original movie “The Langoliers” & “Thinner”, based on King’s novell’s with the same title.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Tom Holland: I am a writer/director. I started out as an actor, working under the screen name of Tom Fielding. I was the juvenile in a movie called “A walk in the spring rain” with Tony Quinn and Ingrid Bergman. I wanted to direct and started writing to that end.

SKSM: When did you make Thinner & The Langoliers? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Tom Holland: Both films were done for a price. I shot the miniseries The Langoliers in 16 millimeter to save money. I don’t remember the cost of either one, but money was a constraint.

SKSM: How come you picked Thinner & The Langoliers into develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Tom Holland: I thought Langoliers had a very strong narrative line and was an audience pleaser. Thinner was always a difficult story. It had sat around for over ten years when I did it. It has been turned down by almost every director in Hollywood. I believe the reason was because it had a bitter ending.

SKSM: Do you might see a possibility to create a new Childs Play movie. And then with the old horror chucky and not the humor chucky. I may assume you saw the last one too and for me it was something to cry about. What Do you think of this all?

Tom Holland: I have heard they are talking about a remake of the original Childs Play. I have had nothing to do with any of the sequels.

SKSM: Did you change your mind about the gypsy spells and cursed dolls after making the movie Thinner and Child’s PLay ?

Tom Holland: LOL (laughing out loud) Sometimes I thought I was cursed with Thinner, especially when I was going through the audience testing process after the movie had been shot. Every audience hated the ending of the movie where the lead character, Billy Hallaeck, lost in his struggle to avoid the curse. The original ending, which was removed by the production company, had Billie’s daughter inadvertently eating the cursed pie. Knowing she was going to die, he, too, ate the pie, thereby committing suicide.

The moral of story, as Stephen King told, was that “moral jellyfish get crushed in the end.” Unfortunately the audience hated the moral. The experience has made me very leery of ever doing an ending where the protagonist loses.

SKSM: Most of your movies that you direct/wrote and act are from the horror/thriller gerne. Did you never thinking of making a comedy?

Tom Holland: Fight Night had a lot humor in it. But a straight broad comedy? No, I don’t think it’s my taste.

SKSM: What are your current plans? You didnt shót any movies since awhile? Are you retire from shooting movies?

Tom Holland: No, I am writing a movie at the moment and hope to secure financing.

SKSM: Why did you direct those stories? I mean, why the Langoliers & Thinners, and not others stories… what interest you in those stories?

Tom Holland: As I said, I thought Langoliers was a terrific story. As to Thinner, I thought it was a terrific character study, but in the end it was a commercial mistake because audiences rejected it, and in Hollywood, it is all about box office success.

SKSM: Some people think you are from the netherlands because of youre name, do you know whether your relatives are originally from the Netherlands?

Tom Holland: My mother’s maiden name was Schoonmaker, which I have been told was Dutch for Shoemaker. Yes, on my mother’s side we are Dutch.

SKSM: I always wondered how Bill Halleck’s (I think) Make-up was done. He starts out as a fat man, and he gets Thinner and thinner, and at a certain point he is so thin, creepy thin. I would like to know: How did you do this?

Tom Holland: It was done with a combination of a fat suit which was constantly thinner and the actor, Robert John Burke, losing weight. I shot as much in continuity as possible to help this affect.

SKSM: What was Stephen King’s reaction to the two movies that you made?

Tom Holland: I don’t know, but hew was present on both sets and was supportive and helpful.

SKSM: Are you plans to adapt another Stephen King book?

Tom Holland: No.

SKSM: When you are at home or going to the movies, what kind of movie genre would you prefer.

Tom Holland: I like horror, suspense and action, leavened with humor.

SKSM: Are there any movies that you have made, where you say now I would be done this diffrent?

Tom Holland: Yes, all of them. (grin) I don’t tank there is a director who wouldn’t like to go back and make their movies better. Also, the more you direct and the old you get, the more you know, so therefore you work should be better.

SKSM: You made in 1996 “Thinner” and “Driven” in 2006. What have you been doing between those years?

Tom Holland: Resting.

SKSM: You wrote the screenplay of “Class of 1984” What was Mark L. Lester thinking of it?

Tom Holland: Mark did a modern remake of “Black Board Jungle“.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Tom Holland: I think Langoliers was a success, Thinner less so. I wish the studio had left the original ending on Thinner. it was more faithful to the book.

He is the man behind Livraisons Matinales 

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself and your team? Who are you and what do you do?

Stephane Montel: My name is Stephane Montel, me and my teammates (Clementine Tronel, Florent Mack and Christian Radosaljevic) are just graduated of L’Institut Superieur d’Arts Appliqués of Paris. We studyed every aspect in the production of a 3d animation movie. Currently, we’re looking for a job in the filmmaking industry !

SKSM: When did you make Livraisons Matinales(Milkman 1)? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Stephane Montel: We made Livraisons Matinales this year, it took five months (from February to June) to make the movie, from the idea to the final cut. The film was made as our graduation movie for school. It didn’t cost a thing, unless several weeks without sleep and a harsh electricity bill due to the computers turned on every time ! It’s a real home made movie, all the team lived together during almost two months.

SKSM: How come you picked Livraisons Matinales(Milkman 1) to develop into a animation movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Stephane Montel: When we were looking for a scenario it happened that Clementine was reading a book gathering several novels of S.King. She told us about Livraisons Matinales. We all liked her and then we started to think about how to develop it into an animation movie. This novel was pretty cool to put on screen in a short time frame. King well describes the background, the mood, the characters but never go too far in the why/what/how blabla… so you have everything you need to turn the story in the way you want without being annoyed by useless details.

SKSM: Your movie is not a dollar baby like all other dollar babies. How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1?

Stephane Montel: I just be aware of this when i watched your website. We didn’t know there were such a deal. It’s great that S.King share his work and his talent with some junior filmmaker, few people do that in the industry.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Stephane Montel: Making a movie is a time eater. When the deadline comes, you don’t see your family, you don’t see your friends… You live for the hope of finishing it. You make joke that only your teammates can understand and you can sink in the deepest sadness for the little bug you didn’t see. It’s very emotive !

SKSM: Are there things cut out of the movie that you miss now?

Stephane Montel: No, all we have made is in the movie. But for my part, just switch the ending music of Hermann Hermitt “There is a kind of hush” by the other title of the same artist “No milk today”.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can see your movie? Do you like the attention of your film around the world?

Stephane Montel: Yes of course, when you spend so much time on a project the best reward is when your movie can be see by a lot of spectators and when you received feedback, good or wrong. The Stephen King’s fans i could show the movie in France were particulary positive about it. I guess they saw too much very bad movies based upon Stephen King’s stories… We also hope that the movie will be selected for animation film festivals around the world.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie-animation? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Stephane Montel: Absolutly not. We tried to create a topic about the film on the official stephen king message board but it never appeared, i gess the moderators did not validate him. If you guys have any tricks to contact Stephen King, tell us ! It would be great if he could see our movie.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Stephane Montel: Currently we don’t have any project on an other Stephen King’s story. But a lot of Stephen King fans in France told me that the short story “Monkey” would be a good choice… Livraisons Matinales will maybe give ideas to other students in filmmaking and animation to work on a Stephen King’s story.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Stephane Montel: Do you know someone at Pixar or Dreamworks ? I hope you will enjoy watching the films as much as we enjoyed to make it. Thank to mister King to have made such good stories and thank to you !

He’s the man behind the 2005 movie “The Mangler: Reborn”, based on King’s novell The Mangler.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Matt Cunningham: Matt Cunningham, writer/director. I have been writing for quite some time. My first film Decampitated was a comedy-horror film that just got turned into comic book form through Devil’s Due comics in a Troma Graphic novel. I am working on several new projects for television and feature film – mostly family and comedy.

SKSM: How come you picked The Mangler to develop into another sequel? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Matt Cunningham: The film actually picked us – ha ha. I was working with the Executive Producer at the time and he came to me and asked if we would be interested in writing/directing the sequel that he bought the rights to. So of course, when an opportunity is put out there like that – you have to take it. I really like the idea of a machine having a life of it’s own. Something inanimate that could actually come to life and go after you. That’s pretty scary. Could you imagine if your toaster just attacked you while making toast. Takes breakfast to another level.

SKSM: When did you make The Mangler; Reborn? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Matt Cunningham: The film was shot in a seedy area of Los Angeles in 2005. The film was made for the price of two brand new BMW’s! and we shot the film in a scary ten days. Yes, that is not a typo. Ten days.

SKSM: You wrote and directed The Mangler Reborn with Erik Gardner, why two directors?

Matt Cunningham: Erik and I were working as a team at the time trying to set up a few other projects. This one just hit and we went full steam ahead. It wasn’t really a creative choice to use both of us, it just worked out that way.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Matt Cunningham: Right now, I don’t have any plans to do more King movies. Honestly one of my favorite books by Mr. King is his book on writing. It is a fantastic book! I love it. However, if I could make a movie around him, I would love to do the story of a young Stephen King as a kid and how his world around him changed him. As if he saw a lot of these scary visions growing up and it sculpted him into who he is today. Like some sort of Roald Dahl story with Stephen King as the protaganist.

SKSM: Are there things cut out of the movie that you miss now?

Matt Cunningham: Ha ha, I wish there was footage on the cutting room floor! That would of been great. What you see in the film is what we shot. We were on such a tight schedule that we didn’t have time to shoot extraneous material – although we had a couple endings in mind. We also had a few scenes that would of been shot different and more stylistic. Time is not a filmakers friend in low budget.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Matt Cunningham: Hadley’s house in the film is a notorious adult film house in LA. A lot of adult films get shot there and we had many visits from the police thinking that we were shooting adult films. But when they found out it was a horror film they left us alone. We heard that neighbors would see naked people out on the lawn and other crazy stories like that. The owner of the house, well, I could blog for days on that guy.

SKSM: What do you think about of the first and second movies of The Mangler?

Matt Cunningham: I remember seeing the first one in the theater and thinking it was fun, but not really scary. The second one – hmmm… not a big fan.

SKSM: Why can we only viewing The Mangler Reborn on DVD and not at the theatre?

Matt Cunningham: The deal was for the film to be a DVD release through Lions Gate. There was never a thought of it going theatrical.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Matt Cunningham: Unfortunately, we did not get to speak to King about the film. And I am not sure if he has seen it. It would be intersting to see what he thinks. We took his story and added a little twist to it – trying to stay true to his style of creepiness and the idea of losing yourself (or Hadley losing himself in this case).

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Matt Cunningham: I appreciate the opportunity to speak about the film and the fact that it is being recognized on your site. That means a lot. Thanks to everyone for reading. Thanks Bernd, for everything. (imdb.com)

 


He played in Natalie Mooallem’s Dollar Baby All That You Love as Alfie Zimmer.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Brad Holbrook: I’m a New York City actor/journalist (not a common combination!). I’ve spent most of my adult life as a TV news anchorman, here in NYC and in several other cities around the US. Currently I anchor a weekly half hour program for BusinessWeek, a show that focuses on consumer issues like investing, spending, and earning money. But I’ve spent much of the last four years getting back to an acting career that I put on hold shortly after graduation from college. In addition to “All That You Love“, I’ve appeared in Jonathan Demme’s remake of “The Manchurian Candidate” with Denzel Washington, Leib Shriver and Meryl Streep, as well as several network television dramas. I’ve done lots of theater, too. New York’s theater life is vibrant, to say the least. My latest production is a play written by former Czech Republic president Vaclav Havel in 1968. It’s a French farce kind of thing, lots of mayhem, doors opening and closing, etc. We did the play in November 2006 for the NYC Havel Festival, in which all of his plays were performed over a six week period. He came to one of our performances, and we all got to meet him. A big thrill! We were invited to re-stage the play in Baltimore, Maryland to open the season for The Theatre Project there in October 2007. It’s a demanding play. My character only leaves the stage for an instant at a time, and immediately returns. Visit http://web.mac.com/bradholbrook for more about what I’m up to!

SKSM: How did you become involved in All That You Love?

Brad Holbrook: I was invited to audition.

SKSM: You worked with Natalie Mooallem on this film, how was that?

Brad Holbrook: Natalie is a force of nature. She is extremely creative and enthusiastic. And a sweetheart. I’m a tennis fanatic, and so is Natalie! We’ve corresponded about the various tournaments going on around the world.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Brad Holbrook: Movie shoots are always an exercise in crisis management. For one scene we had “borrowed” a deli in a New Jersey town to use as a set. After we shot the scene from one angle, the deli owner decided he didn’t want us there any longer. He had started to notice that his customers were having difficulty buying stuff, and he didn’t want to lose any more business. The producers and Natalie pleaded with the man for a while. We only needed to shoot for a few minutes more, but we got kicked out anyway. So we ended up borrowing another deli to shoot the rest of the scene from the angle of the cashier’s perspective. So what we ended up with is a scene between Alfie and the cashier shot in two entirely different locations! I don’t think you can tell in the film, although once you know what happened you might be able to spot a small inconsistency or two.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Brad Holbrook: I’ve seen Natalie and a few of the crew at screenings. She wants to enter the film in festivals and so forth, so I look forward to possible reunions.

SKSM: What did you do after All That You Love?

Brad Holbrook: I’ve done some theatre, including that Havel play. I’ve also shot a bunch of videos for websites. That is a booming market for actors! The Onion News Network is an off-shoot of The Onion newspaper, a parody of the day’s events, and is hilarious. I play a network morning show host alongside a drop dead gorgeous co-host (Tracy Toth), and neither of us (our characters that is!) have a clue about how brutally cruel we are being to our guests. I think it’s very funny. These segments will be added to the Onion’s website soon, and then through the Fall of 2007.

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Brad Holbrook: I have to admit that Carrie scared the bejeezus out of me, the film with Sissy Spacek. I loved that. I’ve only read a few of his novels, but I’ve seen many of his films. My son is a big fan.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Brad Holbrook: Thanks for the interest! I hope you get to see Natalie’s adaptation of All That You Love, and that you enjoy watching it as much as we did making it.

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