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Title: Project Nine (2010) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 1h 15′
Director: Brianna Colleen Byrne, Romeal Hogan, Bendan Nagle, Jonas Pachuski, Keri Rommel, Adam Schonberg, Jason Stoy, Dan Sullivan & John Theroux
Script: Dan Sullivan
Cast: Carl Hoffelder, Stephanie Motta, Chris Wojcik, Jacob T. Emery, Steph Young, C. Alexander Martin, Danielle Griffis.
Trailer Part 7
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Title: Here there be tigers (2010) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 8′
Director: Aaron Botwick & Joshua Meadow
Script: Ben Botwick
Cast: Moze Halperin, Samuel Sesek, Marisa Zakaria, Mary Kate Kelly, Ricky Ostry, Chelsea Daniels, Beatrice Rothbaum, Monica Klein, Alex Posa, Andy Fenster.
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He is the man behind Flowers For Norma Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: My name is Juan Reinoso and I am an independent film writer/producer/director. I own a small production company called Wayfinder Films. Before starting the company I worked as an Assistant Director on hundreds of national commercials and music videos. But I come from an acting background in the theater originally, having started as an actor at the age of 6 and actively through my early adulthood. I do still act a bit, though I began directing small things in the theater when I was 16 and have basically found myself truly in love with that over all else.

SKSM: When did you make Flowers for Norma? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: We shot the film for 3 days over the second weekend of November in 2009. It was filmed entirely on location throughout Brooklyn. As for what it cost, I will let that remain a mystery. Obviously to maintain the period elements of 1963 it was very difficult, but it was pulled off beautifully my fantastic production designer and art department. Overall, it was an incredibly smooth shoot with very little problems. I always insist that my sets be enjoyable atmospheres for every single person involved. I like to think that helps move things along more smoothly. I love what I do and love making sure the team around me feels that love.

SKSM: How come you picked The man who loved flowers to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: I was a huge Stephen King fan growing up. The story had always stuck in the back of my mind. I hadn’t read a Stephen King story or book since high school (graduated in 1993), but that story just always lingered there. In order to continue building my reputation as a director I decided I should definitely do something a bit more ‘high profile’. And that story instantly popped back up in my mind. While it has a very violent and shocking ending, I always saw it more as a metaphor to the decay of the United States and New York City during that period in history, both morally and physically. The 60s were a massive turning point in history beginning with the shocking assassination of a beloved President and then our entry into the Vietnam conflict. And the city of New York, once a thriving and joyous melting pot of life, slowly began its descent into drugs and desperation. When I first moved to NYC I arrived just before the great ‘clean-up’ of the Mayor Giullianni. I saw first hand how the city began to change again and become a thriving and safe place to be. And I feel that by exploring tragic moments in our histories, both personal and international, are the only ways we can truly learn and grow. The Young Man of the story became a metaphor for the death of joy and love and prosperity and the descent into madness, chaos. The question is, Will we ever rise out of that chaos again? I am an optimist, but only because I like to see through the chaos into possibility.

SKSM: For what reasons did you changed the original title (The Man Who Loved Flowers) into Flowers for Norma?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: There is a romantic element to the film that we delved into more detail on from the story. We really wanted to show why this man was so in love. So we added the character of Norma (the name he whispers at the end of the story) and gave a past to this character. It became more about the loss of this great love in his life than just about him.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: Well, I had heard from a friend of mine who had tried to adapt this same story that the option was offered for $1. I honestly had no idea that that was a regular thing and that there was this sort of small culture of ‘Dollar Babies’. It was all new to me. Since I’ve been in the business for a long time I knew the steps to take to get the rights to something, but I didn’t know it would only be $1.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: Bloopers are always my favorite part of the job. There was a moment when I made my cameo in the film and I unintentionally made one of our stars, Chris Mulkey, break character and start laughing. Problem is, we couldn’t STOP laughing. And he is a very well known character actor from hundreds of movies and hundreds of television shows. So I enjoyed that moment in particular.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: I have to admit that it does sadden me a little that the only legitimate way for fans to see these works is to go to the film festivals where they may show. I don’t know if there is a DVD collection of these works planned or not, but I think that would be a fabulous concept. At the same time, I respect the reasoning behind the choice not to allow it for consumption on the internet. I think the honor of being able to make films out of the shorter works of Stephen King is a great opportunity for any filmmaker. It allows you to bring to life the world of one of the greatest living writers and that alone is an honor. I believe it is an important stepping stone for those who are truly dedicated to the art form. And for Stephen King and his camp to be so open and supportive of young or up-and-coming filmmakers is a blessing. It helps one hone their craft with great material and hopefully continue to grow as an artist. I very appreciative of this. So regardless of any release, I can not complain. I am very fortunate.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: We did not have direct contact with him, no. But he was actually in NYC while we were shooting. But I wouldn’t have expected him to come if he had known about it. He’s a busy man, I’m sure, to say the least. He has not seen it yet as we are now in the final stages of color-correction on the film. Once it is done we will be sending it to them.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: Ahhhh, yes, I do have hopes of adapting another story. I would like to do a feature length film based on another one of his much older short stories. Another one that has stuck in my mind for a long time. But I’m not going to say which one. We will leave it a mystery for now.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Juan Pablo Reinoso: I do want to thank everyone for being a part of this culture. It’s very fascinating and exciting. I just hope you can all lend your support as much as possible. Have discussions on imdb or other forums about the film. Start conversations. Any and all support would be greatly appreciated. Thanks so much for letting be a part of the interview!

Title: Popsy (2009) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 9′
Director: Mattson Tomlin
Script: ?
Cast: Neville Archambault, Nicholas Cabello, Robert Curtis, Kevin Gebhard.
Trailer
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He is the man behind In The Deathroom Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Joe Leavell: I’m an artist / photographer in Indianapolis, Indiana and run my own business downtown there. The studio is around 15,000 sq ft and is comprised of mainly photography equipment and backdrops / backgrounds. It is in it’s 3rd year and has resonantly been sold. So I’m in the process of finding a second. I also share my time at St. Mary’s child center teaching “at risk” children and documenting there development. Currently I’m working on a documentary about the school and the function of early childhood education.

SKSM: When did you make In the Deathroom? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Joe Leavell: In the Deathroom” was shot in three, 12 hour days last summer and post production started started in February 2009 and the finally showing in completion in November 18th 2009. It was funded through donations. Tony Profumo was the main producer and fund raiser. Tony and I (as of today) have never met. He contacted me after seeing I was casting for the short and wanted to be involved. The budget, in total had borrowed camera equipment and lighting came from my studio. Most cash was spent on location and food, drink, print, little advertising, and festival submissions. All together in cash was under $2,000 dollars US.

SKSM: How come you picked In the Deathroom to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Joe Leavell: I wrote to many writers looking for a short and to my delight the office of SK replied and explained the Dollar Deal to me. I can’t remember if I thought of the Deathroom or if it was suggested. I had sent links of my first 5 min short, that’s plot was 1 person torturing people and Deathroom was 3 people torturing 1. So the option to do the that tittle was a quick and easy decision.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Joe Leavell: Assistant director J. Tyson Harvey could tell you some of those stories better then I.

SKSM: If you know that there where more versions of “In the Deathroom” created would you choose another story to adapt into a Dollar Baby?

Joe Leavell: No. I knew there was some. I’ve found the best was to find where your art stands is to compare and contrast. I would have loved to have seen the dollar baby fest, just to watch the story telling and stylization differentials from both films. And soon more to come apparently.

SKSM: Now that your film is finished, don’t you think… Would you do it different?

Joe Leavell: Yes, there are things I wish we could have gotten (HD) to make it better. But I’m proud of the film and feel we played the had dealt very well.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Joe Leavell: We sent an unfinished version a few months ago and haven’t heard back.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Joe Leavell: I think most directors deep down know the importance of making “The Gunslinger” and how great the pressure and price it would be to do so. Still, if I lived in a dream with a large budget… I’d do it.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Joe Leavell: please tell me what you think. Comment on the trailer at youtube.com

She played in Damien Maric‘s Dollar Baby La Femme Dans La Chambre as the 2nd Nurse.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Lina Veyrenc: My main activity is acting. I have with my husband a little theater in the 15th district of Paris: l’Atelier theatre Frederic Jacquot. We also manage together a Drama School and we are very proud of our students because many of them are working and meet some success.

SKSM: How did you become involved in La femme dans la chambre?

Lina Veyrenc: I have been informed about the project. As I liked very much Stephen King’s books I knew the novel and I thought the subject was very interesting. So, I sent photos and cv. Fortunately Damien sent me the script!

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Lina Veyrenc: In fact, Damien wanted me to audition for the mother’s part. I have worked very hard and the day I passed the audition Damien told me he really appreciated my work but he thought I was too young to play the mother. As he liked my work he told me he could add a nurse in his script which would be played by myself. I answered positively immediately. The contact with him was very professional and very warm so I really wanted to work with him.

SKSM: If you thinking back are there things that you could do better?

Lina Veyrenc: Things I could do better? I don’t know! I would probably have loved to be older at that time for having the opportunity to play the mother…I’m kidding; Nathalie Bleynie was excellent and gave poignancy to the part.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Lina Veyrenc: There were many, many funny moments. The atmosphere was very warm and we were like children having fun in a playground. Vincent Aze is particularly funny and he has got a great sense of humour. I really enjoyed that time.

SKSM: You worked with Damien Maric on this film, how was that?

Lina Veyrenc: I also really enjoyed working with Damien. Damien is a director who knows exactly what he wants. He is very professional. He never hesitates to spend time to explain to the actors what he wants and it’s very comfortable to work with him. I appreciated him a lot for that too. Well, he loves his actors and to be honest we love to be loved!

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Lina Veyrenc: Well, I don’t really have contacts with the crew. You just make me realize that I’m too busy and I haven’t taken the time to keep in touch with them and it’s very bad. Ok, I will try to change that…

SKSM: What did you do after La femme dans la chambre?

Lina Veyrenc: After “la femme dans la chambre” I returned to the stage in different plays; comedies from Feydeau, Guitry, Maupassant, all are very famous authors. I still play in “Maupassant : Au bord du lit”; we have some performances planned for December. I’m working as an assistant in the next play “George Dandin” which starts on the 12th of November in my theater. And of course I’m open to any professional propositions…

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Lina Veyrenc: Definitely yes I’m a fan of Stephen King’s work. When I was a teen-ager I read most of his books.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Lina Veyrenc: First, many thanks to you, Bernd for having given me the opportunity to answer this interview. I also whish all the best to Damien and thank him a lot for this so great moment I had working with him. And, finally, many thanks to the numerous fans too. The artists couldn’t exist without the public and the fans. Personally, their support makes me happier and better!

 

He played in Sarah Sterchele’s Dollar Baby Walking Ghost as The Gunslinger.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Jus Buckingham: My name is Jus Buckingham. I’m originally from Lansing, Michigan. I am an actor and musician.

SKSM: How did you become involved in the Walking Ghost?

Jus Buckingham: Some people in the film department of my college were putting the project together. They held auditions and I got the part.

SKSM: Did you have to audition for the part or was it written directly for you?

Jus Buckingham: I auditioned. I knew some of the crew through plays I had done in the area.

SKSM: In the original story the character is a white person, how did you handle this?

Jus Buckingham: It wasn’t a problem. It wasn’t something that we thought about.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when they made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Jus Buckingham: Ha! I remember shooting some of the scenes in the winter and it gets cold in Michigan. REALLY cold! There was a cold advisory that went one night when we were filming, but we had a schedule to stick to. So the whole night, we would shoot a scene and I would run inside to get warm. It was like a well oiled machine! It’s funny because the movie looks like we were in a hot desert, but in reality we were in huge sand dunes in the dead of a Michigan winter.
We had a lot of fun on this shoot. Too many things to name!

SKSM: You worked with Sarah Sterchele on this film, how was that?

Jus Buckingham: She was great. It was her first time out I believe, so we learned a lot together.

SKSM: Do you still have any contact with the crew/cast from that time? If so with who?

Jus Buckingham: I’ve moved away, but I talk to some people from the project every now and then. Usually facebook or myspace.

SKSM: What did you do after The Walking Ghost?

Jus Buckingham: I was involved in many, many plays! I’ve starred in some independent movies. I had a stint in a hip hop band called “Cloth & Canvas” as the saxophone player and song writer. I’ve also produced music on my own and for other artists all over.

SKSM: In the beginning the title was “The Gunslinger” and after that it changed into The Walking Ghost. What do you think of that?

Jus Buckingham: I believe it was changed, because the story was an interpretation of “The Gunslinger.”

SKSM: Are you (or were you) a fan of Stephen King’s work?

Jus Buckingham: I am a big fan of Stephen King’s work!

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything else you want to say to the fans that read this interview?

Jus Buckingham: No, thanks for the opportunity. You can catch up with my current music and other works at myspace.com/imanactorhireme

 

Title: Everything’s eventual (2009) Bandera de Estados Unidos
Runtime: 1h 18′
Director: J.P. Scott
Script: Chad Callaghan
Cast: Michael Flores, Joe Young, Cavin Gray, Shane Dean, John Rea, Matthew Taylor, Dennis Ford, Lauren Alonzo, James Aiken, Richard Anderson, Tomas Johansson, Matthew Keats, Jackie Olson, Peter C. Riddell, Tom Sponberg.
Trailer
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He is the man behind In the Deathroom Dollar Baby Film.

SKSM: Could you start with telling me a bit about yourself? Who are you and what do you do?

Luke Cheney: I am 23, I graduated with a degree in film in 2009. I have been making videos since I was 16 and will be moving to Los Angeles soon to start a career in filmmaking.

SKSM: When did you make In the Deathroom? Can you tell me a little about the production? How much did it cost? How long did it take to film it?

Luke Cheney: We shot the film in November 2008 in two and a half days in a small studio. It was shot in and around Denver, Colorado with a local cast of professionals. I estimated that my budget was just under 2,000 US Dollars.

SKSM: How come you picked In the Deathroom to develop into a movie? What is it in the story that you like so much?

Luke Cheney: The story is of course brilliant and very well crafted. The way King spins the everyday interrogation room dialogue by adding in the inner thoughts of the main character makes it fascinating. To steal a quote from Hitchcock, “There is no terror in the bang, only in the anticipation of it”. While reading “In The Deathroom” you know someone is going to die, but to hear the main character go through the different scenarios in his head, really makes it a thriller. From the filmmakers viewpoint, the story was perfect because it had one location and a small cast. And for a first time director, like me, it was great because it allowed me to focus on the storytelling and getting the right performances from the actors, instead of worrying about all the little things that could wrong.

SKSM: How did you find out that King sold the movie rights to some of his stories for just $1? Was it just a wild guess or did you know it before you sent him the check?

Luke Cheney: The way I found out about the Dollar Deal was thanks to the movie “The Shawshank Redemption“. I decided to read the published shooting script while watching the movie. After the movie was over I read the forward written by King. And it was all about the Dollar Deal and how he did one with Darabont back in the day. So, instantly I went to the library and started reading as many shorts as I could find.

SKSM: Was there any funny or special moment when you made the movie that you would like to tell me about?

Luke Cheney: Thanks to a couple of setbacks we were lucky to complete this film. On the first day of shooting, one of the actor’s cars broke down 30 minutes from the studio. The boom-guy was battling a hernia for the entire shoot. And the assistant director was recovering from a case of pneumonia from the previous week. Besides all that, it was one of the most meaningful weekends of my life.

SKSM: If you know that there where more versions of “In the Deathroom” created would you choose another story to adapt into a Dollar Baby?

Luke Cheney: Luckily, I was the first one to adapt “In The Deathroom“, but I have great curiosity to see what others will do with the story.

SKSM: Now that your film is finished, don’t you think… I would be doing this different?

Luke Cheney: Of course, when any filmmaker goes back and looks at their own work they wish they could change things. The majority of my film came out just like I envisioned, I am very pleased with it.

SKSM: How does it feel that all the King fans out there can’t see your movie? Do you think that will change in the future? Maybe a internet/dvd release would be possible?

Luke Cheney: Although its agitating that the people who would appreciate the films the most can’t usually see them, it’s a great gift that we are even allowed to adapt the stories. My idea to get these Dollar Babies seen is to get a good handful of them on one DVD and sell them, with the proceeds going to a charity of King’s choice.

SKSM: Did you have any personal contact with King during the making of the movie? Has he seen it (and if so, what did he think about it)?

Luke Cheney: I have had no personal contact. All that is certain is that a copy of my film was received by his office.

SKSM: Do you have any plans for making more movies based on Stephen King’s stories? If you could pick – at least – one story to shoot, which one would it be and why?

Luke Cheney: The other short story that I really enjoyed was “The Ledge“, its also a 1st person narration. The only problem is that “The Ledge” would require a fairly large budget to make into a film.

SKSM: Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions. Is there anything you want to say to your fans?

Luke Cheney: I would like to say, Thank you to everyone out there that encourages and supports Dollar Babies. And hopefully in the future you will be seeing more of me, and I will be seeing more of you.

-Luke Cheney

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